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Alzheimer's Center

Alzheimers Symptoms

People diagnosed with Alzheimer's who experience dementia often have trouble thinking and speaking clearly, remembering recent events, and learning new things. Over time, it becomes hard for a person diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease to handle everyday activities and take care of themselves.  But how can you identify the signs and symptoms of the onset of Alzheimer's?  What are the symptoms of dementia?

AD usually begins after age 60. The risk goes up as you get older. Your risk of developing Alzheimer's is also higher if a family member has had the disease.  It'ms important to remember that every person is unique and dementia affects people differently - no two people will have symptoms that develop in exactly the same way. An individual's personality, general health and social situation are all important factors in determining the impact of dementia on him or her.  Some possible signs of early dementia or the onset of Alzheimer's disease include:

  • Changes in mood or behaviour
  • Changes in personality
  • Difficulty performing familiar or routine tasks
  • Disorientation to time and place
  • Loss of initiative
  • Memory loss
  • Misplacing things
  • Personality or mood changes
  • Poor or decreased judgement
  • Problems with abstract thinking
  • Problems with keeping track of things
  • Problems with language - finding the right words, understanding what people are saying

People with AD may first have trouble remembering things that happened recently or names of people they know. Later on, AD sufferers may become anxious or aggressive, or wander away from home.

It is important to see a doctor if you notice any of these symptoms in yourself or a loved on as they may be due to other conditions such as depression, drug interactions or an infection.  Having an early diagnosis and starting treatment in the early stages of Alzheimer's can help preserve brain function for months to years. Learn more about how to diagnose Alzheimers by reading the next section now.  

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