Medical Questions > Mental Health > Sleep Disorders Forum

Unable to wake up in morning

I'm 27 and since my teenage years I've found it almost impossible to get up in the morning and oversleep constantly.
Its beginning to really mess up my life as I often oversleep when I have important things to do, such as I've slept through job interviews and once missed my flight when I was going on holiday.
When I wake up in the morning I feel totally exhausted and it takes a tremendous effort to get out of bed and do anything. Even when I do get up I end up falling to sleep in the bath or in a chair when I have got dressed.
I have 4 different alarm clocks but it makes no difference as I either sleep through them completely or turn them off and fall back to sleep.
I can honestly say I find it easier to just stay up all night if I have something to do in the morning than go to sleep when it is a huge task to get up for it, and have actually started doing that occasionally in the last year so I can't oversleep.
Its common for me to go to bed at 12 or 1am, intend to get up about 9am, then just oversleep through til about 2pm or 3pm in the afternoon.
I hate being like this and its pretty much wrecking my life, as I basically can't hold down a job amongst other things.
Has anyone else had a similar problem and got any suggestions for dealing with it.
I stress this has nothing to do with me being depressed.
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First Helper Imaginos7
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replied May 12th, 2009
Supporter
It does seem as if you have some type of sleep disorder. I think you should talk to your doctor about having a sleep study done to figure out why you are unable to have a restful sleep.
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replied March 26th, 2010
Did you find a solution for this? I have a friend who is having a similar problem and I am concerned he is going to get fired from his job because of it.
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replied August 18th, 2010
Progressive Sleep Disorder??
I'm almost 25 yrs old & I Have the Exact Same Problem and i have no idea what to do? Am I Sick With Something or Am i just Lazy? my Family members have had it up to here with me and i'm afraid to lose them.add to that i am currently out of work and not interested in looking because i don't know how i'm going to be able to hold a job like this.as my friend said I'm NOT Depressed but actually this ailment,whatever it is,is pushing me right there into depressed.
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replied August 18th, 2010
I have had this exact problem ever since I was a child. I did not graduate high school because I would always sleep past noon. I have lost jobs from being late or missing full days.

It's very hard to explain to other people and make them understand, but when I wake up it's like i'm in another world. I will say and do anything just to go back to bed. I used to have terrible fights with my parents, and now with girlfriends or roomates. After I wake up I end up apologizing for the stuff I say to them because I regret it and didn't mean it.

It seems like a lot of people have this problem, I have not found a solution but if I ever do I promise I will make a website and provide the information free to everyone.

It really is a big problem in life, I would do anything to be able to have a normal wake up.
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replied April 1st, 2011
I have also suffered this same problem since I was a child & it disrupts my life. I hv lost jobs, got in accidents, speeding tickets, & went to DD school many times. Now upon doing research I came across a blog/article specifically addressing this issue. The first article I read is called "How to get up Rt when your alarm goes off" It is at stevepavlina.com. The first time I tried it I was amazed cuz it worked. But I am still in the beginning stages of working on this. It is a matter of practicing & training your subconscious mind. Since I am still working on this I will give updates & keep ppl posted on the effectiveness of the method. I blv it is a matter of working thru it & finding what works & what doesn't for you as an individual. I blv smtn like this works more for ppl who r told they do not hv a medical problem. I hv had sleep studies done & was told my sleep is normal. I do still find that hard to blv but I do know that times when I hv gotten rt up, I hv felt better. I hope that helps. I see that many ppl hv the same problem. I blv that a reg schedule, nutrition, & exercise all come into play. Well, I am still working thru all this. My prayers go out to all who hv suffered this problem.
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replied August 18th, 2010
I loved sleeping in also, but not to th3e extreme as what you have shared. I knew that I was different from the others (so called normal) but did not know what to do. I experimented through the years and have overcome this problem. I actually feel like a morning person now instead of the nocturnal person I was. Routine was the key for me. I believe all people like routine but some have to have it while others can get by. I stopped caffine at 12 noon, no matter what. Had my coffee in the mornings and that was it. I ate supper at 5 to 5:30 with no exceptions and as the meals were not perfect on diet, basically always ate a semi rounded meal with meat, starch and vegatable, with WATER for my drink. Drank average of gallon of water a day. I would go to my room at ten oclock when sleepy or not. This was the only time I would be in my room at any part of the day. I would then turn my tv on for the local new. Would drink half glass of milk, eat about 4 saltine crackers. I turn the lights off and leave tv on and try to make it through the sports at least. I would then get set up confortably, turn my tv off and sit and meditate silently till fell asleep or got very drowsy and close eyes. I set my alrm for 5:00 in the morning, no matter if Monday and went to work at 8 or it was Saturday with nothing to do. After few short weeks, I did not have to set the alrm for the morning, I woke up at 5, got up and looked forward to my first cup of coffee. Its been good ever since but the one thing I have to work on and remind myself with, is the going to bed at resonable time and no caffine past 12 noon. I know this is long winded reply, but heh, it worked for me. Have learned that there are no for sure quick fix pills for everything, and to get change, we have to be willing to put the effort out and try something different. Sweet dreams or should I say, Good Morning and Rise and Shine!
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replied September 5th, 2011
You actually need more discipline when youâspam�re fully awake and conscious: the discipline to know that you canâspam�t trust yourself to make intelligent, conscious decisions the moment you first wake up. You need the discipline to accept that youâspam�re not going to make the right call at 5am. Your 5am coach is no good, so you need to fire him.

Whatâspam�s the real solution then? The solution is to delegate the problem. Turn the whole thing over to your subconscious mind. Cut your conscious mind out of the loop.

Now how do you do this? The same way you learned any other repeatable skill. You practice until it becomes rote. Eventually your subconscious will take over and run the script on autopilot.

This is going to sound really stupid, but it works. Practice getting up as soon as your alarm goes off. Thatâspam�s right âspam practice. But donâspam�t do it in the morning. Do it during the day when youâspam�re wide awake.

Go to your bedroom, and set the room conditions to match your desired wake-up time as best you can. Darken the room, or practice in the evening just after sunset so itâspam�s already dark. If you sleep in pajamas, put on your pajamas. If you brush your teeth before bed, then brush your teeth. If you take off your glasses or contacts when you sleep, then take those off too.

Set your alarm for a few minutes ahead. Lie down in bed just like you would if you were sleeping, and close your eyes. Get into your favorite sleep position. Imagine itâspam�s early in the morningâspam¦ a few minutes before your desired wake-up time. Pretend youâspam�re actually asleep. Visualize a dream location, or just zone out as best you can.

Now when your alarm goes off, turn it off as fast as you can. Then take a deep breath to fully inflate your lungs, and stretch your limbs out in all directions for a couple secondsâspam¦ like youâspam�re stretching during a yawn. Then sit up, plant your feet on the floor, and stand up. Smile a big smile. Then proceed to do the very next action youâspam�d like to do upon waking. For me itâspam�s getting dressed.

Now shake yourself off, restore the pre-waking conditions, return to bed, reset your alarm, and repeat. Do this over and over and over until it becomes so automatic that you run through the whole ritual without thinking about it. If you have to subvocalize any of the steps (i.e. if you hear a mental voice coaching you on what to do), youâspam�re not there yet.

Feel free to devote several sessions over a period of days to this practice. Think of it like doing sets and reps at the gym. Do one or two sets per day at different timesâspam¦ and perhaps 3-10 reps each time.

Yes, it will take some time to do this, but that time is nothing compared to how much time youâspam�ll save in the long run. A few hours of practice today can save you hundreds of hours each year.

With enough practice âspam I canâspam�t give you an accurate estimate of how long it will take because it will be different for everyone âspam youâspam�ll condition a new physiological response to the sound of your alarm. When your alarm goes off, youâspam�ll get up automatically without even thinking about it. The more you run the pattern, the stronger it will become. Eventually it will be uncomfortable not to get up when your alarm goes off. It will feel like putting on your pants with the opposite leg first.
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replied September 5th, 2011
You actually need more discipline when you’re fully awake and conscious: the discipline to know that you can’t trust yourself to make intelligent, conscious decisions the moment you first wake up. You need the discipline to accept that you’re not going to make the right call at 5am. Your 5am coach is no good, so you need to fire him.

What’s the real solution then? The solution is to delegate the problem. Turn the whole thing over to your subconscious mind. Cut your conscious mind out of the loop.

Now how do you do this? The same way you learned any other repeatable skill. You practice until it becomes rote. Eventually your subconscious will take over and run the script on autopilot.

This is going to sound really stupid, but it works. Practice getting up as soon as your alarm goes off. That’s right — practice. But don’t do it in the morning. Do it during the day when you’re wide awake.

Go to your bedroom, and set the room conditions to match your desired wake-up time as best you can. Darken the room, or practice in the evening just after sunset so it’s already dark. If you sleep in pajamas, put on your pajamas. If you brush your teeth before bed, then brush your teeth. If you take off your glasses or contacts when you sleep, then take those off too.

Set your alarm for a few minutes ahead. Lie down in bed just like you would if you were sleeping, and close your eyes. Get into your favorite sleep position. Imagine it’s early in the morning… a few minutes before your desired wake-up time. Pretend you’re actually asleep. Visualize a dream location, or just zone out as best you can.

Now when your alarm goes off, turn it off as fast as you can. Then take a deep breath to fully inflate your lungs, and stretch your limbs out in all directions for a couple seconds… like you’re stretching during a yawn. Then sit up, plant your feet on the floor, and stand up. Smile a big smile. Then proceed to do the very next action you’d like to do upon waking. For me it’s getting dressed.

Now shake yourself off, restore the pre-waking conditions, return to bed, reset your alarm, and repeat. Do this over and over and over until it becomes so automatic that you run through the whole ritual without thinking about it. If you have to subvocalize any of the steps (i.e. if you hear a mental voice coaching you on what to do), you’re not there yet.

Feel free to devote several sessions over a period of days to this practice. Think of it like doing sets and reps at the gym. Do one or two sets per day at different times… and perhaps 3-10 reps each time.

Yes, it will take some time to do this, but that time is nothing compared to how much time you’ll save in the long run. A few hours of practice today can save you hundreds of hours each year.

With enough practice — I can’t give you an accurate estimate of how long it will take because it will be different for everyone – you’ll condition a new physiological response to the sound of your alarm. When your alarm goes off, you’ll get up automatically without even thinking about it. The more you run the pattern, the stronger it will become. Eventually it will be uncomfortable not to get up when your alarm goes off. It will feel like putting on your pants with the opposite leg first.
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replied September 7th, 2011
nurseinstead
Sometimes i am also Unable to wake up in morning,the reason for mine is that i will go to bed very late.I think you should consult a doctor and try to sleep as early as possible
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replied April 10th, 2012
I have had the same problem. Intending to wake at 8 or 9 a.m. and oversleeping till 2 or 3 p.m. I dropped out of high school because of it and ended up getting a GED years later. It has wrecked any chance of me getting a job where I'm expected to be there early. As such I have been a shift worker for years. Tomorrow is actually a shift which I get stat pay/time for and I've called in sick because I would have to be awake at 5 a.m.. I slept in today until 3 p.m. so I know I wouldn't get any sleep before work. I made the decision to down a bottle of wine and sleeping pills to help me get to sleep early. I know that can be a dangerous combo but I know my limits and have a high tolerance anyway. That isn't the answer but I read here that cutting out caffeine after 12 noon works. I can back that up because during a period where I wasn't working I tried to become a morning person. I stopped coffee all together and had only tea. Also didn't drink tea/soda past the afternoon. Also I would routinely go to bed at the same time everyday. It worked but working shifts doesn't allow for that schedule. So I'm going to try giving up caffeine after the first 4 hours of getting up. I'll keep my results posted. Take Care.
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replied August 9th, 2013
Sleeping my life away!!!
I have the same exact problem too. I've actually gone to a doctor because I fall asleep at work and in the car too, it's dangerous. I was told that I have Hypersomnia to Acute Narcolepsy. I've been doing Ritalin 5mg 3 times a day but it's still not working. I have my alarms set (all 4 of them placed around my room!) for 6:30am with my medication on the night stand with a glass of water and that's what I do soon as my alarm goes off. Even with a stimulate I fall right to sleep and often over sleep. I get in trouble a lot at work but I've just started looking into the Americans with Disabilities Act and Narcolepsy is covered under that. So I'm going to see a sleep specialist and see if there's anything that my primary care physician hasn't thought of and can give me some type of documentation for work. If you find any sort of solution (OTC or prescription wise) please let me know. I find that the whole discipline crap only works with people that have that type of personality for it. I hate commitment so if I can't bring myself to eat right and jog daily for my health and shape then making myself wake up based on numerous lifestyle changes ain't gonna work either!
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replied December 17th, 2015
I suffered through this exact same affliction until I reached my 50's. It's not gender specific but I wonder about hormone imbalance of some sort. Has anyone offered an explanation? I suffered very low self esteem because I could not hold a decent job therefore have lived in poverty.
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