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Beneficiaries of Stem Cell Research

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Do you know anyone personally who could benefit from stem cell research. What, particularly, could this person use?
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replied June 25th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
There is a condition in my family called x-linked retinitis pigmentosa which is a degenerative condition that means the sufferer goes blind over a period of time, usually years. Basically, the retinal cells are dying and not being replaced, unlike in normal people. If you look at a photograph image of my brother's retina, it is all covered in black marks, like ink that won't rub off. Stem cell technology could be used to allow the dying cells to regenerate and, maybe, even grow new ones so no more people would have to grow up with this condition, helplessly watching the tunnel close in around them.
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replied June 25th, 2007
Especially eHealthy
My grandmother has Alzhiemers. Enough said.
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replied June 26th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
Hey
my grandfather has alzimers too---hes 70 something. he isnt gonna last much longer.
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replied March 7th, 2008
Especially eHealthy
Turns out my grandmother doesn't have Alzheimers, which is rather a relief! Over Christmas break the doctors and nurses at her new care center decided to do a few simple tests on her, based on the kinds of symptoms she was exhibiting, such as loss of balance, memory loss, and incontinence. The concluded that she might actually have hydrocephalus, aka water on the brain. They went and did a test procedure where they drained some of the cerebral fluid, and she showed improvement! So they went in this January and put in a full shunt from her brain to her abdomen, allowing the excess brain fluid to drain out. What was happening is that too much fluid in her brain was compressing it, causing many problems.

Today, my grandmother is doing much better. She can walk with a walker and a little by herself! I'm not sure about the other symptoms but I assume they've gotten better as well!
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replied March 19th, 2008
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ive heard that they can use this for eye condidtions as well ----is that true?
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replied March 19th, 2008
Especially eHealthy
I can't understand how reducing pressure on the brain would help cure eye conditions, unless the condition is being cause by pressure on the optical lobe.
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replied March 19th, 2008
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lol i ment stem cells. i heard that stem cells could be used to treat eye condidtions
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replied March 19th, 2008
Especially eHealthy
oooo, I'm silly. Yeah, definitely it could help. Grown a functional optic nerve, or regrow an eye, etc.
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replied May 15th, 2008
Re: Beneficiaries of Stem Cell Research
admin wrote:
Do you know anyone personally who could benefit from stem cell research. What, particularly, could this person use?


As a matter a fact a two years ago I met a wonderful little girl around the age of I guess 10 months old. I was informed that she has this rare thing where the muscles in her legs will never be strong enough to support her so she'll never be able to walk, stand, run, nothing. She can sort of sit up with her parent's help but she's going to be confined to a wheelchair for life.

They are *soooooooo* close to a cure but thanks to our wonderful President and bans on things research was cut so the wait is on. I have a lot more in depth information but I need to get it from my father it's actually a close friend of his in Florida their daughter.

She's the reason I donated my chord blood and the reason I finally signed myself up for organ donation I've always said donate everything but now it says it on my licence.
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replied June 4th, 2008
Extremely eHealthy
Re: Beneficiaries of Stem Cell Research
admin wrote:
Do you know anyone personally who could benefit from stem cell research. What, particularly, could this person use?


It might be easier to answer this question if some of the diseases stem cells are targeting is listed.


The Promise of Stem Cells

Studying stem cells will help us understand how they transform into the dazzling array of specialized cells that make us what we are. Some of the most serious medical conditions, such as cancer and birth defects, are due to problems that occur somewhere in this process. A better understanding of normal cell development will allow us to understand and perhaps correct the errors that cause these medical conditions.

Another potential application of stem cells is making cells and tissues for medical therapies. Today, donated organs and tissues are often used to replace those that are diseased or destroyed. Unfortunately, the number of people needing a transplant far exceeds the number of organs available for transplantation. Pluripotent stem cells offer the possibility of a renewable source of replacement cells and tissues to treat a myriad of diseases, conditions, and disabilities including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, spinal cord injury, stroke, burns, heart disease, diabetes, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.




http://stemcells.nih.gov/info/health.asp. What are the potential uses of human stem cells?
Stem cell research contributes to a fundamental understanding of how organisms develop and grow, and how tissues are maintained throughout adult life. This is knowledge that is required to work out what goes wrong during disease and injury and ultimately how these conditions might be treated. The development of a range of human tissue-specific and embryonic stem cell lines will provide researchers with the tools to model disease, test drugs and develop increasingly effective therapies.

Replacing diseased cells with healthy cells, a process called cell therapy, is a promising use of stem cells in the treatment of disease; this is similar to organ transplantation only the treatment consists of transplanting cells instead of organs. Currently, researchers are investigating the use of adult, fetal and embryonic stem cells as a resource for various, specialized cell types, such as nerve cells, muscle cells, blood cells and skin cells that can be used to treat various diseases.

In theory, any condition in which there is tissue degeneration can be a potential candidate for stem cell therapies, including Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injury, stroke, burns, heart disease, Type 1 diabetes, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, muscular dystrophies and liver diseases.
In addition, retinal regeneration with stem cells isolated from the eyes can lead to a possible cure for damaged or diseased eyes and may one day help reverse blindness. Bone marrow transplantation (transfers blood stem cells) is a well-established treatment for blood cancers and other blood disorders.

9. Are stem cells currently used in therapies today?
Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or blood stem cells, present in the bone marrow are the precursors to all blood cells. Blood stem cells are currently the only type of stem cells commonly used for therapy. Doctors have been transferring blood stem cells by bone marrow transplant for more than 40 years. Advanced techniques for collecting or "harvesting" HSCs are now used to treat leukemia, lymphoma and several inherited blood disorders. Cord blood, like bone marrow, is stored as a source of HSCs and is being used experimentally as an alternative to bone marrow in transplantation.

New clinical applications for stem cells are currently being tested therapeutically for the treatment of musculoskeletal abnormalities, cardiac disease, liver disease, autoimmune and metabolic disorders (amyloidosis), chronic inflammatory diseases (lupus) and other advanced cancers. However, these new therapies have been offered only to a very limited number of patients.

10. Why is cord blood a valuable resource?
Cord blood is rich in hematopoietic or blood stem cells and is currently being used as an experimental alternative to bone marrow transplantation. The collection process is completely non-invasive, the host-donor match required for transplantation is less stringent and cord blood has fewer mature immune cells and thus poses a lower risk of graft vs. host disease.

For more details on cord blood collection, storage and current therapies: http://www.nationalcordbloodprogram.org

Secondly, the resulting embryonic stem cells could be developed into a needed cell type, and if transplanted into the original donor, would be recognized as 'self', thereby avoiding the problems of rejection and immunosuppression that occur with transplants from unrelated donors.


http://www.isscr.org/science/faq.htm#7
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replied January 2nd, 2012
Just like many other things in this world, stem cells can be used for helping others but also have the potential for abuse. Stem cells are wonderful, especially if you have a child that has cerebral palsy or leukemia. If you're a mother or father and can imagine caring for a special needs loved one then I'm pretty sure you'd agree that making them healthy is the first priority in your life. Right now research is being done to assist in curing Type 1 Childhood Diabetes by generating new pancreatic cells, also research is being done to assist in regenerating heart and brain cells to improve the quality of life of those with heart disease and for stroke victims that have no movement on one side of their body or that cannot speak. I think this technology is amazing and I hope that one day my babies cord blood will be able to improve our family's health "naturally" without synthetic devices or multiple medications.
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