User Profile
Firstly, I am going to be seeing a doctor about this, but it is causing me anxiety to no end, so I am looking for general information while I await an appointment.

Ok, the condition: I have a small lump on the back of my neck on the right hand side. It isn't a visible, top of the skin lump, but one that is more underneath the flesh. I think it moves slightly, but I can't be 100% sure if it is moving, or if it is just the skin/flesh around it moving. Also, it isn't really "hard," but it isn't squishy and soft either, it is kind of in the middle. I think it may be a swollen posterior cervical lymph node based off of some pictures I have found, but other pictures I have seen suggest that the posterior nodes on your neck run in a line more on the side of the neck (parallel with the ear down to the collar bone area) than on the back of it.

To be more specific about the location, it is about two inches or so to the right of the center line of my neck, and about even in height with the bott


Did you find this post helpful?
|

User Profile
replied April 12th, 2007
General Q&A Answer A2547
Generally, the lump on the back of your neck can be considered a "tumor", but it's not possible to tell you anything about its nature. Tumors can originate from the skin, subcutaneous fat tissue or from the neck muscles. Tumors that originate from the skin move as the skin moves. Tumors from the subcutaneous fat tissue are also movable but don’t move together with the skin. Tumors that originate from the muscles are immobile. The lymph nodes are found in the subcutaneous fat tissue. You don’t need to be obsessed with the “tumor”, however. A physical examination (palpation and inspection) will provide you with general information about that lump. Fine needle punition or a biopsy can be performed later, if necessary.
|
Did you find this post helpful?
Must Read
Chronic pain affects more than 70 million Americans. But what is pain? And how can pain management help relieve different types of pain? Basic facts here....
How does the nervous system work to register pain? And what are the major causes of acute and chronic pain? Plus, who's at risk of pain here....
Acute and chronic pain manifest different symptoms. Learn the difference here and know when to seek medical help for pain....
DISCLAIMER: "Ask a Doctor" questions are answered by certified physicians and other medical professionals. For more information about experts participating in the "Ask a Doctor" Network, please visit our medical experts page. You may also visit our General Q and A , for moderated patient to patient support and information.

The information provided on eHealth Forum is designed to improve, not replace, the relationship between a patient and his/her own physician. Personal consultation(s) with a qualified medical professional is the proper means for diagnosing any medical condition.