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Ortho K Adverse Effects (Page 1)

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i thought that once you stopped ortho k, my eyes would go back to their original shape. I found out otherwise. Today, I have starbursts, double vision and floaters. It's just unfortunate that I was not told I could have such problems. If so, I would never have done this procedure which has altered my eyes in a scary way. I'm calling an SOS. This is making me lose my mind and my senses. Someone has any advice on what's happening and possible solutions ?

Any help regarding this is welcomed.
Thanks. Confused
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First Helper en_trance002
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replied October 30th, 2007
Similar Problems With 6.5 Yrs Orthok Wear!!!
Dear renaudt,
I started orthoK back in 2000, an optometrist marketed as "a way of arresting progression of myopia by age 18". It was good to start with, until 2 yrs ago, when I would wake up in the morning and the lenses would be stuck off-center to my eyes, especially the right eye (more often). I tried to be as careful as I could taking them off with suction cup (which is how I've always taken them off). Sometimes my eyes would be mildly dry, and I could take them off easily after rewetting my eyes. But these "seal off" incidences made it difficult to remove. I would get double vision for that day. Next night, might get better and be on-center. I thought it was going to be fine. This happened with random frequency, but the off-centering in the morning increased in frequency in the past 2 yrs. (I didn't even wear them for more than 6 hrs a night.) I told this optometrist twice about my off-center / dry eye problems, who was not worried at all and dismissed them as "normal." I complained of increased astigmatism, and he continues to call them "normal". I had already forgotten that I did not have astigmatism before treatment. The optometrist simply told me to use some eye drops, but he never advised me stop. Not even a hint.

This summer I was finally formally diagnosed with dry eyes by an ophthamologist, and was formally treated with Restasis and Lotemax. Apparently, for all this time, my condition was such that I should have never been wearing orthoKs. I stopped wearing my orthoKs in June. I thought that was it. I switched to glasses. It was all fine until 2 months ago, I noticed I had persistent double vision, more noticeable in my right eye than left, even with glasses on. Very noticeable in dim light to no light conditions. In the past month, I noticed that I now even see a hint of ghost images (with glasses on) in well-lit rooms. The ghost image is even clearer, opaque, and more divergent than it was a month ago, I'm pretty sure of it...

I am also becoming very worried that this is progressive. I also would like solutions to this problem. Multiple visits to eye docs show that my problem is purely corneal -- topography shows a terrible bowtie pattern, spread over the cornea, which accounts for my severe double vision (both eyes, more severe in right). Without my glasses, it's a visual nightmare, esp. in darker rooms. It is bothersome reading light text on dark backgrounds (or anything like that for that matter). The original optometrist "lost" my original topography from 2000, and continues to say "well, FDA said it was reversible."

I am also very worried this will affect my night vision and driving in the future.

I am extremely upset at his irresponsibility with his orthoK practice. I am also going online and stuff to look for people that might have similar problems. You are one of the rare few that I've found, so I thought I might make myself known, too. I started when I was in middle school--talk about patient autonomy exploitation--and if it were something I was introduced to now, I would go online and do tons of research before agreeing. And from what I read, I would never have started such a treatment. I used to have a little myopia. Now I have high myopia + regular astigmatism + irregular astigmatism. It has been 4 months, and my monocular diplopia has only gotten worse. (Lesson: Cornea re-shaping...if it ain't broke, don't fix it!!!!)

Please let me know if eye docs up there have any solutions. I'll try to keep posted here, too.

Thank you. I hope there will be some kind of resolution for both of us.
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Users who thank en_trance002 for this post: RenaudTremblay1  VijSmartGuy 

replied May 12th, 2009
Ortho K Gone Wrong
Hi en_trance002, so finally I am not crazy and this has happened to other people too? I was told by my optometrist I had large pupils which might have contributed to the correction being messed up. Anyway, I feel I have to carry part of the blame for this, my vision was perfectly normal with contacts and glasses before ortho-k.
Anyway this thing is a whole mess. Doctors won't operate me for floaters because I have the type of floaters that can't be seen with pupil dilation so they won't operate on a problem they can't see. Personally, I can't say my life was much better before ortho-k, but hey, I guess you always expect great things to happen. I'd wish life was little more a beach. When I get more $ I might go to lasik dudes and ask them if they can make ghosting, starbursts and double vision disappear. I'm very sorry this happened to you, wish you the best,
Renaud
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replied September 11th, 2011
Fuchs Dystrophy
It sounds a lot like Fuchs Dystrphy which I was recently diagnosed with after being unsuccessfully treated for "dry eyes". I got a second opinion and she said I had corneal edema, Fuchs Dystrophy. Make sure you see an Opthamologist and have him check you for this. My symptoms sound a lot like what you are going through. Good luck!
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replied May 18th, 2009
Is this a place for complainers?
Seems like a lot of negativity here. My friend swears by his "retainers." He said he wouldn't let anyone do surgery because he would permanently loose his near vision since he's 45. I would try it I needed glasses but thank goodness I don't. My PCP said he thought people that did LASIK were taking the chance of throwing away a perfectly healthy eye.
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replied May 18th, 2009
People please!!
Lets see. Surgery or no surgery...hmmmm. Are you kidding me! Online there are hundreds (thousands?) of websites with people complaining about Lasik surgery. I even found one where the FDA was investigating Lasik in 2008. The real investigation should be in determining why the general public doesn't know more about Ortho-k.

Forty yrs of Ortho-k and the only complaints I find online are the few above. Twenty yrs of eye surgery and you find thousands of complaints online. Do the math.
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replied May 19th, 2009
Ortho k is at least as safe as contacts
Patients should be checked yearly. Eyes do change over time, whether they don't use any correction or not. Dry eyes may develop over time and need to be treated. Floaters have nothing to do with retainers or contact lenses. Understanding the way Ortho K works is important to understanding why it is reversible and safe. There are many people who will develop vision and eye problems throughout there lives regardless of their use of glasses, contacts, ortho K, refractive surgery, or no correction at all.
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replied May 19th, 2009
time to unshape
One fact that is not addressed in the original question is how long the person has been without the molds. It takes time for the eye to return to its original position. Candidates for LASIK will be consulted to remove their rigid lenses for sometimes upwards of a year to be sure that they eye has returned to its original shape. Starbursts and halos are not uncommon when the eye is unmolding.
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replied October 7th, 2009
Like Marvin Gaye would say: "What's Going On?"
Has anyone ever investigated the possibility that the pressure applied to the eyes by the reshaping lenses could cause debris to detach from the eye and result in floaters? I'm no specialist, but again, i'm just saying...

Like en_trance002, though I haven't been wearing the ortho-k lenses for now more than 2 and a half year, the double vision, ghosting, starbursts and halos remain, even though myopia/astigmatism returns to original shape. They did corneal topography to me too but didn't talk to me about a possible bad pattern/deformation.

I've been told double vision/ghosting/starbursts/halos MIGHT be fixed with laser surgery, though it's quite an investment.

As for the floaters which I think result from orthok pressure to the eye, I've been told they can't be fixed, even with special laser treatment/vitrectomy, because they are small debris close to the retina so they're not visible to the practioner when doing pupil dilation.

Looking at it, I paid less than 1000 $ for this thing. I guess I've got the service I paid for. Friends i know did laser eye surgery and paid 3000$ and are satisfied with the results. And when I first experienced problems with ortho-k, I didn't immediately report them to my practitioner, even though he told me that "if anything was wrong just me a call".

Anyway, in the study done by Paragon CRT, 21% of the subjects stopped wearing the lenses because of unacceptable vision. But it probably works fine for some people. It did work fine for me at the beginning (that's why I started the treatment after the trial), but at some point I started seing double and starbursts and probably should've stopped wearing the lenses immediately when a problem occurs (as advised) and contact the practitioner. And instead of stopping treatment I went back again to get other similar lenses (I pushed it and lacked reason somehow).

But I guess for people like me who like the practioner to handle the process in its entirety, Laser eye surgery might be more suitable, since for ortho-k you have to repeat the wear and all every day. Probably why it costs 5 times more (more popular, practical, less hassle).

Anyway, sometimes a whole situation just lacks reason, and it's just too bad. I guess despite the damage and some craziness, you just have to put yourself together, get to your senses.

"Tryna make some sense of this all, na na na..."
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replied March 30th, 2010
I am now one month out of the Paragon CRT lenses and I wanted to share my experience. I am a healthy 36 year old with nothing special about my eyes and have stable myopia of -2.75. I looked at getting laser eye surgery done and actually went to six consultations. They all said I was a good candidate (which I believe that I am) but in the end I chickened out, mostly because I was afraid of getting dry eye, or some other eye discomfort, which seemed to be a common side effect. However, I still wanted to get rid of my irritating eyeglasses and uncomfortable soft contact lenses and CRT seemed to be the safe answer for being lens free during the day. “Just as safe as regular contact lenses,” everyone says. So three months ago I had consultations with a couple of optometrists, who are Ortho-K specialists, and decided to choose one and start the treatment. I should have known it was a bad omen when, during the first night of wearing the CRT lenses, one of the lenses fell out while I was sleeping. After five weeks I wasn’t too happy with the results and relayed that to my eye doctor. I had blurred vision most days and saw halos at night. I had trouble focusing on close reading for the first couple of hours after waking up. In addition, my eyeballs ached, which at the time I attributed to eye strain from not being able to see 100% and to a bad head cold I got during week three. I continued to wear the lenses when I went on a week long vacation and when I got back I picked up different CRT lenses from my eye doctor’s office in hopes of remedying my vision problems. I wore the new lenses one night and the next day is when everything started to go bad. A floater in my right eye, which I vaguely noticed around the start of my vacation, suddenly became a huge annoyance when I started to read from computer screens again. I had a foreign body eye sensation under my right eyelids. The lower left quadrant inside my right eyeball started to hurt more than the usual ache. I immediately stopped wearing the CRT lenses. My right eyeball began to swell, increasing in size for two weeks until other people noticed something was wrong. Four days after I had stopped wearing the lenses the pain in my right eyeball turned from moderate to severe. A week after I stopped wearing the lenses I seemed to become photophobic. I saw my eye doctor three times over three weeks and I got a second opinion from the other Ortho-K specialist that I originally consulted with. Neither could tell exactly what was wrong with me and neither would directly blame my problems on the CRT (which I do). My regular eye doctor gave me some antibiotic eye drops for blepharitis which he thought was giving me the foreign body eye sensation. It had mixed results. The second eye doctor gave me a new eye drop drug, Bepreve, and he dilated my right eye for a retinal exam. Both the eye drop and the dilation caused instant relief. Strange, I know.

One month off of CRT I take stock of where I am at. Visually, as far as I can tell, my vision is now as good as my pre-CRT vision (it took two and a half weeks before I could start wearing my old glasses). The exception, of course, is the floater in my right eye. In the last few days a floater in my left eye has decided to join it. Physically, my eyeballs are not the same as pre-CRT. I still feel like I’m protecting an injured body part. The severe pain in my right eye is now gone and the swelling of my right eyeball has mostly disappeared. However, both eyes feel sore, particularly when I wake up. It’s not the same ache as when I was wearing the CRT lenses, but my eyes don’t feel as good as they did pre-CRT. I still have a foreign body eye sensation with my right eyelids (both when my soft contact lens is in and out), though not as bad as before. I still seem to be photophobic. I used to like a bright living room, work space and computer screen; now I have turned down the brightness with all of them. I won’t venture outside without my sunglasses.

For most people corneal refractive therapy works out great. But as my experience has outlined, there are risks, potential side effects and the possibility of unsatisfactory results. If you are contemplating this treatment, the insight that I would pass on to help you make an informed decision is this: Paragon CRT and Bausch & Lomb VST (and I presume other manufacturers) advertise that the reshaping is gentle and that their lenses are as benign to the eye as wearing soft contact lenses. In my opinion, corneal refractive therapy is traumatic to something as sensitive and fragile as the eye. It should come as no surprise if someone has complications because of their Ortho-K lenses that they didn’t have with their soft contact lenses. Personally, I would never let an Ortho-K lens touch my eyes again.

By the way, the irony is not lost on me that the thing I was afraid of most with laser eye surgery I eventually experienced with the “safer” CRT.
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Users who thank KLcanuck22 for this post: TBle 

replied April 1st, 2010
CRT and VST: no risks, really?
Renaud Tremblay
+1 514.779.9021

My story is similar to the one outlined by the user in the March 30th 2010 post. Thank you for your objective post. I admit my previous posts lacked some objectivity, even though I was describing a real situation. The question remains, CRT or VST or whatever name it has, seems to cause irreversible damage to some people. But since these facts are not widely known nor accepted in most cases, what can we do about it, in other words, how can we prove our case? Any ideas are welcome, as well as comments discrediting or supporting our statements.
Thank you to all contributors.
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replied April 5th, 2010
I too tried the Ortho-K contacts. I wore them for 3 months. Sure wish I had seen this site before I tried them. I googled the name brand and tried to learn as much as I could...unfortunately, I didn''t google Ortho-K and side effects. I only needed readers as my distant vision was 20/30. When I quit wearing them 3 months later it was 20/100. All the while my doctor kept telling me I was on the right track. I also had the double vision or halos whatever you want to call it. I went from seeing really good in the distanct to not being able to read the large green signs on the side of the expressway. Driving in unfamiliar territory was impossible because I couldn''t read any street signs. It concerns me that my doctor never disclosed the possible negative side effects the ortho-k could have on my vision. He only stressed the positive. I could never recommend Ortho-k contacts to others.
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Users who thank Springforjoy for this post: TBle 

replied January 5th, 2011
Problems only arose recently
I've worn ortho k lenses since 2005 and I experience vision improvement and little to no discomfort. But within the last year, I started to notice that I wouldn't be able to wear my contacts every night due to discomfort and sometimes, pain. My eyes would be swollen and red, mostly from the tears they produced because they were irritated by the contact. The problem mostly persisted in my right eye and my left eye never really experienced any discomfort. I started to develop floaters in the summer of 2010 in my right eye only, and only after I had worn my contacts. I attributed the problem to "old" contacts, because I hadn't done my yearly update/switch. So, I took them to college, and after a few weeks or so, they became so painful that I couldn't keep them in for more than a few minutes. The vision improvement to my right eye was minimal; mostly it was just swollen and super sensitive to light. I stopped wearing them and got prescription glasses, which I wore for two months. After I got glasses, I developed astigmatism (as my eye doctor told me). At my eye check-up, my ophthalmologist told me that floaters were not problems I should attribute to ortho k lenses because ortho k acts on the cornea, not on the retina. All I know is, the floaters are only in my right eye (which is where all the discomfort is). So, either the floaters are the cause of the pain from my contacts, my contacts are causing the floaters, or the contact pain and the floaters are a common response to something else. Because it's only isolated in my right eye and I haven't had injuries to that region before, I think that the contacts and the floaters are directly related.
I recently received a new pair of lenses, custom-fitted to my new topography info. I've been wearing them for one week so far, and although they haven't been painful to wear, they're definitely uncomfortable (again, mostly in the right eye). My vision in the right eye is blurry. The discomfort has also gotten worse. I don't know why ortho k is suddenly giving me all these problems. They worked perfectly for 4+ years. Should I stop wearing my contacts or should I give it one more week? Help me
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Users who thank shellycodfish for this post: TBle 

replied May 4th, 2011
This is a very scary thread: I am sitting here, scheduled to start wearing my Ortho K lenses for the first time tonight, and I'm seriously considering not doing it and cancelling my appointment in the morning! I was never told of these risks of floaters and eye problems by my optician, just that it was benign and not a big deal. Perhaps I have found out just in time - although I did spend Ãspam£100 to try them out!
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replied June 4th, 2011
hi guys, ok im gonna be straightforward, ok, my experience with ortho-k started out well but ended up horrible. i really hate talking about this, but hey, let's be honest here, it's what's it's all about here, i have some mental health problems. i am starting to wonder if ortho-k and mental health issues is a bad combination since you have a lot of responsibility in the process. i have to admit i didn't follow up as much as probably was needed with the eye doctor, i had issues in my life which maybe made me neglect what deserved utmost attention: eye treatment. i guess for people who are perfectly sane ortho-k can work out great if their relationship with their practioner is great and full of trust. i guess when you neglect your follow ups etc., things can go south, and have maybe side effects that the companies making the devices won't even disclose cause most people doing the follow ups don't have. and i guess it's business and they wanna sell their stuff and not want people to run away scared. i'm just wondering to what level does my mental health problems and poor follow up with practitionner may have caused the poor outcomes and to what level... ah whatever, i guess im not that crazy since other people have experienced similar misshaps, but i guess since it's serious business (eye treatment) there is some level of risk and rigorous follow ups are needed. i think this whole thing is a shame but that nobody forced me to do ortho-k and that you are responsible for your own decisions (e. g. i chickened out lasik md in 2003 for like 2257$) i guess one of the lessons here is don't chicken out, and trust the people who are treating you or go away, anyway it's kind of messy, but i think the hard but necessary thing is that moving on is the way to go, but i have to say that one of the worst things in all that is i wasn't able to build a trust-filled relationship with the practioner, anyway i have a collegue who did lasik md and is satisfied, and i know a certain number of people who did lasik and are satisfied, and i know nobody personally who did ortho-k, so it's hard to relate. anyway sometimes we make bad decisions, and we all know we can't go back in time to change them, and i think however horrendous some past decisions might have been, the only thing you've got is what you've got now, so regrets are useless. we all which we've made all the best decisions in the past but in life it isn't always the case, it's really hard but sometimes peace with the past, hee, i also have to add my life, apart from golf (4th in a tourney with 79-83... i was having problems with the law, school was awful, work was barely tolerable, i was returning to another program, but i guess sometimes you change just to change, maybe i shoulda given myself a chance for school to turn around and be good instead of running for a change that summer, but i decided not to wait to see how school went and just go on with the change (lasik consideration, finally doing ortho k)but school was awful i went to that summer camp to work but choked it after a week, my dad gave me a job at his golf club, so i didn't spend a lot during that summer, thought about getting an imac laptop, the second time 2006 thought about the tissot t-touch, but ended up ortho k, the thing is i was in a hole, and i probably didn't get out of the hole in the best way, but i did what i could, i'm bipolar so i guess things go crazily up and down sometimes, i know at my job ive been having for little more than 1 1/2 yr there had been some struggles and there still are but i think things are looking up sorta, and i went to talk to this girl the other day and had awesome feeling, stayed up late with my friends that night and went to bed at like 4:30 am and was like dude doesn't feel good to go to bed that late, and friday, for once, i wasn't angry starting work and today at work was pretty fun, hope it continues to be fun like that
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replied June 8th, 2011
Can anyone advise what harm may come from my daughter accidentally using normal multipurpose saline in the ultra violet cleaner instead of the proper solution
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replied June 8th, 2011
Can anyone advise what harm may come from my daughter accidentally using normal multipurpose saline in the ultra violet cleaner instead of the proper solution
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replied October 7th, 2011
OK Guys. Let me qualify myself first. I am an optometrist's daughter, I work in his practice as the Office Manager and as the Optician (I make glasses). I am also an Ortho-K Patient. I will keep my father and his practice anonymous because I dont want this to sound like a sales pitch; its not.

Selecting a good doctor for Ortho-K is probably the most important thing here. Let me start to explain what I mean by giving a little history about Ortho-k.

Ortho-K was discovered by accident back around the mid 60's ('68 - '69) when there were no soft lenses. Patients were coming to their eye doctors and reporting that their vision was different, sometimes very good, when they took their gas perm (hard) lenses off and even into the next day. The doctors started trying to figure out what was causing this change and began to try to fit patients to correct their vision for the better. Since then, millions of dollars have been spent towards research and developement. A new lens design was developed called 'reversed geometry' or what we now know as ortho-K lenses. This new design gained FDA approval mid 1990's.

The reason I am saying all this is because these are HARD LENSES. Any "old school" doctor will tell you; gas perm lenses have their own science to fit correctly. And unfortunately, due to the advent of soft lenses, correctly fitting gas perms is not something that is focused on in Optometric School anymore. When Reversed Geometry lenses gained FDA approval, A company (I will not name) came out with a lens that "any doctor could succesfully fit". Marketing bagan and we had a huge influx in the demand for corneal reshaping. Lots of doctors wanted to jump on the band-wagon, very few had any experience with fitting gas perm lenses, let alone Ortho-K.

ALL of the problems I am reading about above, sound like improper fit issues and using the wrong "accessories" (solutions, etc.), or not using them correctly. If the fit isn't good the results are poor at best and can be damaging! The important thing is finding a doctor who knows how to fit hard lenses and has been doing it for a while.

My father was one of the first Orthokeratologists and has been doing ortho-K since the early 70's. We have patients who have been wearing their lenses for over 20 years succesfully. We have NEVER had any of the results spoken about here. My father is careful about the patients he chooses to take on as Ortho-k patients and he takes many things into consideration, not just prescription.

If the doctor isnt taking your mental status, maturity level, hygiene, and other factors into account before begining this technology with you, there could be bad results. If he's promising perfection. If he's hardly charging much money (compared to other doctors in your market area). If he hasent been fitting hard lenses for long (is new to ortho-k, as a doctor). You might want to look for a new doctor.

Ortho-K IS safe, affective and completely reversible. There are no more and no less risks associated with Ortho-K then with any other optical medical device. Soft lenses, regular gas perms, glasses and laser surgery all have similar risks (sometimes worse)! If your results were that bad, it was probably due to an improper fit by an inexperienced doctor.

Think of this analogy: If an eye doctor wrote a prescription for glasses that was a correct prescription but the optician who made the glasses made them very wrong. The patients vision could be worse after a year of wearing the wrong prescription. Would you bash glasses in general, saying that they were damaging to your eyes and that people shouldnt wear them? No!

Ortho-k is the only known thing that may retard or possibly even stop progressive myopia. The benifits to wearing these lenses are immense and impressive. I will include some links below that will help you research further.

Respectfully,
Jeanne

http://www.orthokinstitute.com/news/114-th e-smart-study.html

http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2 011/s3201248.htm
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replied November 23rd, 2011
My Ortho K Experience
I wanted to share my Ortho K expereince here. I went for a fitting and had no problems with the lenses for about 2 weeks. My vision was improving but I would get fluctuations from right to left eye. I would see really clear with one eye one day and not so clear with the other eye. This changed from day to day. It was never a consistent vision like when you put on glasses.

After about 3 weeks...I could not wear the contacts anymore at night. They became very painful and just intolerable to wear. The following day my eyes were so irritated and it was hard to see.

I went back to my doctor and he gave me another set of contacts to try and he told me to wait for 1 night to pass before wearing overnight again. We also thought that maybe I was intolerant to the solution and so we just stored the lenses in saline solution to see if that was the cause.

I wore the lenses for 1 day during the day and they were great. The second day I tried the lenses on they started to fog up and I removed them both recleaned them and put them back on twice! They kept doing this. I struggled to drive to work that day and removed them immediately when I got to work! I could hardly see to drive it was scary!

I started to put the lenses in the protien removal solution again and the lenses got better for the fogging. They didn't fog anymore! I stared to wear them at night again but the same thing happened after a week. They became very uncomfortable and painful to wear and my eyes would tear.

It turns out that I can't wear these lenses due to dry eyes. My advise to anyone trying this out is to make sure you don't have dry eyes before doing this or you will be in for a lot of pain and discomfort. I really loved the results I got from this eye therapy and I'm sure if my eyes weren't dry that I could have done this long term. It's also very important to find a good doctor who has experience and knowledge in this therapy and is willing to help you troublshoot any eye issues you may have.

Good luck to everyone out there trying this...It really is a good alternative to glasses, contacts or eye surgery if you're a good candidate for it!
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replied July 18th, 2012
Ortho k
I am wearing ortho k two years .everthings is fine with i see everday good ,but something says that i need to stop but in scared for halos and all that stuff .if your lenses work normal ther shouldnt be a problem if i stop right?(srry for my english)
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replied August 30th, 2012
Ortho-k lenses are safe and healthy for the cornea. I work for a company that manufactures the iSee ortho-k lens. We make thousand of ortho-k lenses per month and ship them all over the world. iSee ortho-k lenses gently reshape the cornea while you sleep. They are like retainers for your eyes. When you wake up in the morning you take them out and see clearly all day without the need for glasses or contact lenses. There are also studies that show that they help stop the regression of myopia aka nearsightedness.
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