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Hi recently I have gotten small outbreaks on my inner-upper thigh and a swollen lymph node in my groin. Before the swollen node and before the outbrakes I just had what appeared to be a couple ingrown hairs where the outbrakes are now. I shaved down there which aggrivated the what I think were ingrown hairs so now there are outbrakes. They are red or white, and the skin comes off easy (like a bad burn). They don't itch much and seem to be oozing puss or water (also like a burn). They don't even hurt that bad. Could this just be infected razor burn (the infection caused the node to swell maybe)? Follictus? Jock itch? I don't think it is herpes based on that I have been with my current partner for a year and he has never had any signs of herpes that I can tell. And my other 2 previous partners wore condems when we had intercourse and one of them gets tested regulary for stds. The outbrakes have only been there for about a couple days and the swollen lymph node only came yesterday. Putting antibiotic ointment on the outbrakes seems to be helping and taking ibuprofin seems to be making my lymph node go back to regular size. I am getting a pap test in a few weeks but I would like any information you can give me just to ease my mind. Thanksss!


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replied August 28th, 2006
Sexually Transmitted Diseases Answer A1377
It doesn't seem likely that you have any sexually transmitted disease. The swollen lymph nodes in the groin are probably a reaction (lymphadenitis) to an infection of the hair follicles in the inner-upper thigh. In the case of an ingrown hair, infection is not the only concern. The real problem is that the hair is not growing up; rather, an ingrown hair grow inside the skin acting as a foreign object. What happens in cases of ingrown hairs? Abnormal hair growth prompts a local inflammatory reaction against the hair and an additional bacterial infection can occur. Antibiotics can help temporarily if the hair stays in the skin. You can visit a dermatologist to extract hair from the skin, if necessary, and to diagnose the condition after examination.
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