Will raw egg whites (such as in meringue) make you sick, or are they bad for you in any way?
Thanks. :)

julia
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replied June 23rd, 2006
No one? :(
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replied March 22nd, 2007
Raw Eggs..
as far as i know, it could loss some nutrient in ur body like biotin.
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replied April 22nd, 2007
Experienced User
Raw uncooked eggs can be hazardous with the offers of high risk in getting salmonella and any other diseases from infectious micro-organisms that may be present.
As well, the protein in raw eggs are only 51% bio-available, whereas a cooked egg is nearer 91% bio-available. In lamest terms, you get more protein by spending five minutes cooking it.
Mise well cook them instead of being wise and having a chance of a fatal illness.
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replied April 22nd, 2007
Not quite true, the salmonella comes from contamination of the shell, the interior of the egg is sterile. Make sure you clean the egg shell first before cracking it. Eating just the white will deprive you of all the nutrients of the yolk.
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replied April 22nd, 2007
Experienced User
What-to-do? wrote:
Not quite true, the salmonella comes from contamination of the shell, the interior of the egg is sterile. Make sure you clean the egg shell first before cracking it. Eating just the white will deprive you of all the nutrients of the yolk.


The previous statement wasn't a direct fact.

I recall saying 'raw eggs can be hazardous with risks of getting salmonella'. And yes the shell can be contaminated by pathogenic bacteria like Salmonella enteritidis generally caused by fecal matter. And if it is contaminated with such, you can get Salmonella.
In which, if you were to cook the egg, even if you were to cook shell and all...the actions of cooking the egg kills off the bacteria which is clearly safe to eat whether washed off or not...eliminating the chances of getting Salmonella.
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replied April 26th, 2012
Avidin vs. Biotin in Raw and Cooked Egg White and Yolk
Avidin in egg whites binds-to and holds biotin. Biotin deficiency is sometimes called "egg white injury". Some research suggests that avidin's biotin binding capabilities are not readily reduced by cooking.

Specifically, the temperature required to stop 90% avidin function in 2 minutes is 315 degrees Fahrenheit. (Note, 90% reduction happens in 12 seconds at 375 degrees Fahrenheit.) While the blackened outside fringes of a fried egg might reach this temperature for this amount of time, many parts of the egg white may not come close.

Raw egg yolks, however, are said to be particularly rich in biotin. It seems that most of the avidin will survive cooking in the egg white. To prevent "egg white injury", it has been suggested that one raw yolk for every egg-white (cooked or uncooked) is reasonable and appropriate.
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