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Cervical Cancer

I have cancer cells in my cervix. How fast will it spread and where will it spread to
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replied February 23rd, 2018
Welcome to e health forum.

The main types of cervical cancers are squamous cell carcinoma andadenocarcinoma. Most (up to 9 out of 10) cervical cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. These cancers develop from cells in the exocervix and the cancer cells have features of squamous cells under the microscope.

Once cervical cells begin to change, it typically takes 10-15 years before invasive cervical cancer develops. As the cells change, they first become "pre-cancerous" – a condition also known as "dysplasia" or CIN – the abbreviation for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

When this happens, the most common symptoms are: Abnormal vaginal bleeding, such as bleeding after vaginal sex, bleeding after menopause, bleeding and spotting between periods, and having (menstrual) periods that are longer or heavier than usual.

HPV and early cervical cancer don't always cause symptoms. However, your doctor will check for the presence of abnormal cells in the cervix through a Pap smear at your annual exam. You can also be tested for the HPV virus during this exam.

Stage I cancer of the cervix is commonly detected from an abnormal Pap smear or pelvic examination. Stage I cervical cancer is curable for the majority of patients if surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy are appropriately used.

In stage IV, cancer has spread beyond the pelvis, or can be seen in the lining of the bladder and/or rectum, or has spread to other parts of the body. Stage IV is divided into stages IVA and IVB, based on where the cancer has spread. Stage IVA: EnlargeStage IVA cervical cancer.

For white women, the 5-year survival rates are 69%, and for black women, the 5-year survival rate is 57%. Survival rates depend on many factors, including the stage of cervical cancer that is diagnosed. When detected at an early stage, the 5-year survival rate for women with invasive cervical cancer is 91%.

I hope this information is helpful.



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