Medical Questions > Conditions and Diseases > Orthopedics Forum

Hip Injection? Cortisone Injection? (Page 5)


September 14th, 2011
I am a 78 year old grandma and after hearing horror stories I was worried about having a hip injection but it went so well,I feel I need to share my experience. Be sure you only go to a pain management physician!! They are trained to give you the best experience possible. A numbing agent was injected very slowly down to the hip joint and then removed. Took about three minutes. I felt absolutly no pain during or after the injection. Small band aid and I went home with no pain or weakness in the leg.
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replied September 22nd, 2011
anyone else having to have revision surgery because of problems
Hi all, wondering has anyone else had a lot of pain in the hip since having THR, MOM 3 years ago. Have had to give up my job due to the pain as it is wearing me down. Have been transferred to a revision Cosultant now and he seems to think it is loose and it will need to be replaced sooner rather than later. Would be nice to know I'm not the only one in this position, not that I would wish it on anyone else.
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replied August 13th, 2013
Last week I had a cortisone injection into my hip joint in the doctors office. They used an ultrasound machine to try to place needle in right area. I was used like a guinea pig and they brought in 4 doctors to watch. The doctor that gave the injection injured my femoral nerve and I ended up in the emergency room. I didn't sign a consent form and was not told of the risk. When I got off table I could not extend my leg. My knee buckled and I almost fell down. They had to get a wheel chair to take me out. Luckily my daughter was able to drive me home. I was informed that after 4 hours I would be able to walk and that everything would be fine. Over 14 hours later I couldn't feel my leg from knee down and could not walk. Called doctor and they said go to emergency room and have it checked. The ER doctor said that they injured my femoral nerve. I knew that already because when she inserted needle, my knee started hurting bad and burning like fire. I am just now after a week, able to extend my leg. I have a huge bruise on my knee and groin where needle went in. I would not recommend this procedure to anyone. It hurt like a sucker and they said nerves heal the slowest of anything in the body. 22 days for every 1 millimeter of nerve for healing time, if it heals. It could have been permanent. Now my doctor doesn't want to talk to me or see me. They are afraid they will be sued. What should I do now>
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replied December 22nd, 2011
Cortisone Injection for Labral Tears of the Hips NOT Recommended
I have bi-lateral labral tears of the hips and went to an expert on this condition at the famed Rothman Institute in Philadelphia. The physician told me that cortisone injections in this area are NOT recommended since research and experience has taught them that those who have such injections have more trouble in that area if hip replacement is ever performed. He did not elaborate but I just thought I would share that.
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replied January 21st, 2012
ganglion cyst in the acetabulum, right hip.
I have a ganlion cyst in the acteabulum and was told it was a tumor at first as I have a history of very early breast cancer. My right hip joint looks good on xray, but MRI showed the cyst. I had a bone biopsy that was neg. for cancer. I have seen 3 orthopedic docs and until the last one it did not make since to replace the femur. The last doc followed the MRI through to the back side of the femur and did find an area that the joint space is not very good so he thinks this is where the problem started. They have all talked about total hip replacement,, but this doc is doing an injection first. I am 53 yrs old and I have to work another 12 to 15 years so I hope this can be worked out. I have not read all the post but has anyone else had a ganglion cyst in the acetabulum ? If so did you have an injection and did it help?
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replied January 21st, 2012
Especially eHealthy
Inquizative,

You have a little bit of a complex problem. The cortisone is not really being used to treat the interosseous ganglion in the acetabulum.

If I am reading your post correctly, you have a ganglion cyst within the bone of the acetabulum, called an interosseous ganglion.

One of your surgeons has noted that the ganglion is affecting part of the articular part of the acetabulum, causing hip pain. Due to this, your surgeons are stating that you may need to have the joint replaced. Total joint replacements are basically done for pain control. (In some very specific cases, joint replacements are done to restore a joint destroyed by tumors, infection, etc, but these are individual, unique cases.)

The use of the cortisone is to decrease the inflammation in the joint, to see if that will decrease your discomfort. Cortisone will not make a ganglion go away, or as in your case, the bone to fill in.

If the ganglion was not affecting the actual hip joint, but was causing pain, then the treatment could be to just remove the ganglion and, if the resulting cavity as large enough, pack it with bone graft. But, since the ganglion is affecting the joint, then the surgeons may be thinking, that it would be better to just go with one operation, and do a total joint. (The ganglion in the acetabulum would be addressed at the time of the THR).

As to your age, though it used to be considered a little young for a THR (surgeons used to like to have patients 60 or older), the age of replacements has steadily decreased over the years. (I think the main reason is that patients have demanded that they be done earlier, not really realizing the potential problems and complications with having to have a total joint revised when they wear out. But, that is neither here nor there.) If you were to have to have a total joint done, you should do fine (if you are fairly healthy, ie breast cancer?). As long as you are not out playing pro sports or running marathons on a total hip, and you take care of it, it should last the rest of your life.


But, anyways, the cortisone is most likely to see if decreasing the inflammation in the joint will decrease your discomfort. If it does absolutely nothing, then doing a total joint may be to be thought about. So, the injection could be done for both diagnostic and therapeutic reasons.

Good luck.
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replied February 7th, 2012
Hip Replacement, pain meds cut off.
I need some advice. I'm a 45 year old woman whose both primary doctor and surgeon have both told me that I need to have both of my hips replaced (both bone on bone with one of the 'balls' in the 'ball and joint' completely flattened out). I've been in excruciating pain for a few years now and have being treated with pain meds. My surgeon wants me to try to make it as long as I can by managing the pain before the surgery because of my age.

Unfortunately, my tolerance to the pain meds is getting higher and higher and last week my doctor decided that he wanted to put me on extended relief pain medication. The only one that my insurance will cover is ms-contin which I was supposed to pick up the script for today.

I had an appointment for a pelvic today thinking that the woman doctor would be in (my doctor is a man and I've never had him in all of the 10 years that I've seen him had him do my pelvics), however, I had misunderstood the girl at the desk. The woman doctor that he had come in was a one time thing so I requested to just hold off and go to a woman's clinic to get it done.

When I asked to get my script the girl at the desk told me that my doctor wouldn't give me the ms-contin because I 'had forgotten' that the woman doctor wouldn't be there. I didn't forget! I misunderstood!!! But because of that, he is holding out on my pain medication.

I'm unemployed and trying to start a business so that my kids and myself are able to lead a normal life again but I'm unable to stand on my feet and work it when I'm in such terrible, terrible pain.

My doctor's answer. Go and get cortizone shots in my hip. We've done that before when my hips weren't near as bad as what they are now and they didn't work.

I don't know what to do. I can't stand when doctors get all high and mighty and won't sit down and listen to what their patients are trying to tell them. I asked if I could talk to him a minute to explain to him that it was just a misunderstanding and not me losing my mind and forgetting but he said "if she isn't going to be seen today then I have no time to see her".

He's been my doctor for 10 years ever since he first started his practice but I honestly don't think that he really even gives a damn about his patients like me anymore. To change doctors would be to have to go through all of the same tests over again only to come to the same conclusion.

I don't know what to do. How can he withhold medications to people that need them? What should I do? All he ever asks me anymore is when I'm going to have the surgery. I've tried to explain to him that my insurance won't cover the surgery. He's told me that I need to be on disability but as long as I'm on unemployment and still trying to find something that I'm able to do while our business builds that just as soon as I apply for disability, my unemployment benefits will be cut off and my kids and I will be stuck with absolutely nothing and if he won't continue to try to keep my pain under control, trying to get hired for a job or even trying to build our business will be for not because of the pain.

Any advice???
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replied July 18th, 2012
Hi, I have Femoral Torsion and had a MRI done this week and was told due to the angle of my femoral it has causing friction and pinching and has torn my cartilage and some area around it and have been advised to get the Steroid injection, I'm working part time for the summer and my job consists of standing all day, I'm booked in for the injection on a Friday can get the day off but not the weekend, will it be sore afterwards and would I be ok to stand at work all day afterwards? I need to get this done before I go back to College in Sept due to it causing me a lot of discomfort and pain whilst sitting.
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replied September 10th, 2012
Having read many posts on this site, I just had to write! I started researching "hip injections" as a way to possibly postpone hip replacement. So many have had such painful procedures! I'm not doubting your pain, not for one moment! What I am wondering is where on earth you are receiving your treatments. Admittedly, I live in Nebraska where many most excellent doctors are trained and practice. I had a hip injection this morning at a hospital with the doctor using X ray guidance. There was some pressure as injection went in followed by feeling a "fullness" in my hip area -- but No pain. I was back home in less than 1 hour and am fine. I have had shoulder and hip-bursa injections in my Rheumatologist's office and neck-epidurals in a pain-management clinic. None of the procedures were debilitating nor what I would call painful! I go back to wondering where you're going for treatments. Going to the most experienced doctor actually trained in the necessary procedure is something I owe myself and you owe yourself! I am on Medicare, in case you're wondering. Hope this is helpful and good luck.
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replied September 10th, 2012
Especially eHealthy
Nowimp,

You also have to realize that usually only patients who have a "poor" encounter will post to a forum. Those who do not have any problems, do not write in. Thus, you see a very skewed impression of the problem.

And, it is usually not the physician/surgeon, it is mostly the difference in patients' level of pain tolerance, which is very variable. Some patients can tolerate a considerable amount of discomfort, while others cannot tolerate any at all. That is not to say that there is anything wrong with this, it is just a fact of life. Some patients can have a root canal and take nothing for the little discomfort there is when the Marcaine wears off. Others have to have a strong opioid medication for it. It is the ole’ Bell Curve. While most patients lie in the middle of the curve, there are patients which are way out in the tails of the curve, at each end.

You most likely reside towards the tail of higher pain tolerance. Most of the patients who post to these forums, lie within the tail on the other side of the curve.


Thank you for posting a positive encounter in having an injection. Most positive patients do not. It will help other members when they are reading about what to expect when getting a cortisone injection.

Wishing you the best.
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replied September 10th, 2012
Gaelic,
O yes, I understand "pain tolerance". I wrote my comment exactly because few positive comments are posted, anywhere on any subject. However, several respondents appear to have had their procedure done, or recommended, by practitioners not using "best practice" procedures. I want to be a voice for not being frozen by fear and saying a well-done procedure is better than chronic pain and fear.
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replied September 11th, 2012
Especially eHealthy
Absolutely, and again, thank you for writing a positive comment. It helps members to know that not all encounters are "bad".

Unfortunately, positive comments are rarely written. Patients who do not have problems, get on with life, and usually do not read or write to forums.

It is good, though, to have both sides of the coin.

Again, thank you for writing.
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replied November 4th, 2012
Hi first time on a site like this.am having the injection tomorrow following an arthroscopy on my left hip a few months ago.i have hip dysphasia in both my hips and had an osteotomy on my right hip about ten years ago,which has been very good.so tomorrow am off for the injection to see if it will get rid of the pain and lack of flexibility.bso fingers crossed,will let you all know
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replied November 10th, 2012
Well had the injection.was knocked out for it and they treated the muscles,abductor and inguinal,they did this to rule out rather than treat,am off work for two mths to let the cortisone settle.am ok if don't do too much,but walking for any amount of time is agony.at the mo it feels worse than after my arthroscopy.but they did say it could be like this,it is if the pain continues I will need further op.so all can do is wait
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replied November 10th, 2012
Especially eHealthy
Helenjean,

It is not uncommon for joints to be sore after a steroid injection. Some patients will have several days of increased pain, but then it usually starts to subside.

You do not state whether or not you use a cane when you are walking. If not, you may want to use one in the hand opposite the hip which bothers you the most. By using a cane, you can take up to 50% of the body weight off of the hip joint. But, by using the cane in the opposite hand, you maintain the proper gait mechanics during gait.

Good luck. Hope your feel a little better.
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replied December 29th, 2012
Post hip joint injection severe pain after 1 day of success
This is an old post. Had hip joint injection. 1 day of almost normal walking with little pain, that night I started having excruciating pain which kept increasing and causing lightning like strikes of pain. They don't know why--still check it out.
WHAT I WANT TO KNOW IS, HAS ANYBODY HAD A BAD REACTION DUE TO ALLERGIC PROBLEMS WITH MEDS? I'M ALLERGIC TO IODINE, BETADINE AND SEVERAL OTHER THINGS. Wondering if my severe pain and possible too much fluid might be cause by an allergic reaction. HAS ANYONE EVER HAD THIS PROBLEM? THANKS
I cannot weight on my leg, cannot twist even an nth degree without excruciating pain. CAT shows some fluid---don't know if that is good fluid or too much or bad fluid. Meantime I'm back on the walker and going only to the bathroom.
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replied March 19th, 2013
I received the injection into my hip in december last year but i didn't think much of it because it hasn't took the pain away and it had a local annesthetic in it and it made me feel ill for 3-4 weeks.
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replied March 27th, 2013
My Dad needs a doctor who will give him a cortisone shot
My Dad is having a very difficult time finding a doctor that will give the cortisone shot in his hip. He had had the shop before, years ago. He is 75 years old and wants
a doctor who will give him the shot and stop running test and charging him 300.00 plus for examinations. Dad lives in Columbia , SC . If you know of a doctor in Columbia.SC , please share his name.

Thank you,
Jackie
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replied March 28th, 2013
Especially eHealthy
Jackie,

Sorry to hear that your dad is not doing very well.


Unfortunately, steroid injections into the hip are not without risk. And, it is important to know what is causing your dad's hip pain, before doing a cortisone injection.

If a steroid injection was done in the face of an infection, it could cause irreparable damage. So, again%
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replied April 19th, 2013
Hip Injection
I had a hip injection today that was not x-ray guided and was extremely painful. At times it felt like he hit a nerve and would make me jump in agony. He said my hip was really tight and maybe there was scar tissue. Has anyone else had a injection without being x-ray guided?
My pain is in my hip, groin and buttock. MRI and x-ray were normal but have had pain since car accident five month's ago. Injection is to see if pain is coming from the hip joint.
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replied April 20th, 2013
Especially eHealthy
Jenjar,

Actually, the majority of hip injections are done without the use of x-ray guidance. The hip joint can be approached from the anterior aspect or the lateral.

In a normal hip joint, there is not a lot of joint fluid, so the surgeon does not have to advantage of being able to pull back to obtain joint fluid once the capsule is in the joint. The procedure is totally by feel.


Once the head of the femur is found, then injection is attempted. Most surgeons will use a cocktail of medications: local anesthetics and steroids.


Sometimes the local anesthetic will take the pain down pretty quickly. But, the steroids will not start to work for a few days. So, there can be a period where the patient is pretty sore, just before the steroids kick in.


And, in some patints, steroids just do no do a whole lot for their symptoms. Steroids are suppossed to be used in cases where there is a lot of inflammation. If the process is traumatic or degenerative, steroids may not work at all.


Good luck.
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replied April 21st, 2013
Hi
I'm new here, I had a hip injection with dye 6 weeks ago followed by a MRI scan, it showed a small impingment. I had another injection on the 10th of April with cortisone, I had 4 days pain relief but the pain in my grion and buttock returned so back on pain killers. I was told to record levels of my pain or no pain for 6 weeks, then I'll be reviewed. For anyone reading this both injections were great, never felt anything other than a slight scratch, don't know why I got myself into such a state before hand. Don't know what will happen at my review, I had read you can only have so many cortisone injections a year. I swim 5 days a week to try and keep my joint supple.
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replied April 21st, 2013
Hi
I'm new here, I had a hip injection with dye 6 weeks ago followed by a MRI scan, it showed a small impingment. I had another injection on the 10th of April with cortisone, I had 4 days pain relief but the pain in my grion and buttock returned so back on pain killers. I was told to record levels of my pain or no pain for 6 weeks, then I'll be reviewed. For anyone reading this both injections were great, never felt anything other than a slight scratch, don't know why I got myself into such a state before hand. Don't know what will happen at my review, I had read you can only have so many cortisone injections a year. I swim 5 days a week to try and keep my joint supple.
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replied April 27th, 2013
Hi, never posted anything here before. Was reading the posts & thought I might add my 2 cents worth. I live in Port Lincoln South Australia. We are a small town about 650kms from South Australia's capital city Adelaide. I have been experiencing hip pain for quite a while. First started about 4-5 years ago, went away & then reared its ugly head again about a year ago. I have been managing it mainly with physio treatments knowing that at some stage I will need a complete hip replacement to my left hip. I'm only 46 with 2 kids under 10 years old and a very supportive husband. I had discussed with my physio a treatment called Prolotherapy which consists of injections into the area to try to improve healing. I tried this a few times with no success. So the next option, to delay surgery, was a steriod injection. I had my first injection on Tuesday evening & my doctor injected me under the guidance of an ultrasound. I have to be honest, it was very painful & I have a fairly high pain threshold. I could feel it going in. It could be that my leg was very tight in that area. After it was done I felt a bit of heaviness in that area, almost as if I couldn't lift my leg properly. After about an hour that went away. I went to bed but only got about 4 hours sleep. I heard that the injection can stuff up your sleep for a couple of days, the next day I slept fine. It's now day 4 & I'm finding that I know that the issue is still there but the pain is nowhere as bad as it was. I can also lift my leg with a lot more ease, like when I get in the car. I had the injection like everyone I guess, I want to put off the operation until later in the year, hopefully. So at the moment I think the pain was worth it. My Doctor has said that if I havent had any change in 3-4 weeks it probably wont get better. I'm hoping to get a few months of relief from it & then assess our family & work situation. Good luck to whoever gets the injection. At the moment I would guarantee it.
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replied May 20th, 2013
I'm 80 and had a hip replacement last year. It is still painful. They gave me a cortisone injection two weeks ago which was the most painful thing I have ever gone through. I'm still having pain. The doctor suggested therapy but I don't have the money to pay co-pays.Cortisone doesn't seem to work for me. Guess I'll just have to get used to it and use a cane again. I will never have another cortisone injection again. My eyes teared up when the doctor was getting ready to inject me.
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replied May 28th, 2013
Well I had my review after my second cortisone injection to my hip, the last injection only gave me 4 days pain free I was shocked when I was told I needed surgery for a impingement and a tear to be repaired, the operation could be around Aug time, I have a holiday booked so the surgeon said he'd see if he could book me in sooner, I was told I'd be on crutches for 6 to 8 weeks, Ugh!
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replied July 25th, 2013
Hip injection,replacement
High all,reading your articles regarding cortisone injections .as I have just returned from my surgeon who notified me that he won't inject the hip as the hip is very prone to infection,especially if your going to have surgery within 12 months. I have had a hip replacement On the lft side with a great outcome.right side next and to anybody that is concerned should not be,highly recomended,up and walking the next day and apart from the cut no joint pain.also had my left knee replaced which is a lot more painfull but worth the pain in the long term.
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replied November 16th, 2013
Cortisone Hip Injection
I had mine in left hip yesterday, not a nice experience, no local anaesthetic. Done under fluoroscopy,Ortho Surgeon took 5 attempts to get at the joint (something to do with it being differnet to the norm) never felt so much pain in my life (and I had broken the tib.fib. and femur in that leg 35 yrs ago!

Either that or I have a very low pain tolerance which I doubt, as I have had external fixation removed from my Tibia before with a lot less pain, just felt like electric shocks all the way!

This was in the UK

I would have to think twice about having it done again.
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replied August 26th, 2014
Hip bursa injection
Is a cortizone injection into hip bursa the same as hip cortizone injection?
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replied August 27th, 2015
I had my first hip injection today. I have osteoarthritis in my hip joints. Decided on doing the side that is much worse than the other first. It was done under x-Ray. He went in with numbing medication first which burned quite a bit. Then he penetrated the ball and filled it with the steroid. Obviously the joint is very inflamed and it hurt like the Dickens. I screamed and I have a high pain threshold. I was told that the pain during injection was expected for my case, as I have quite a bit of damage in the joint on that side. It stems from a severe fall I had about 8 years ago. I don't think I would opt for another injection. My next step is hip replacement. It works however. I can feel the pain relieve already.
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