Medical Questions > Mental Health > Addiction, Recovery Forum

I Have Decided to Let Alcohol Go

Hello folks,
this is my first post on this website but I obviously found this site because of my longing to free myself from alcohol. I have noticed in recent months and recent years, my intake of alcohol has increased to a level that I do not feel comfortable with. I used to drink a few beers and that would be cool, with of course partying harder on the weekends etc etc. But then I fell into a 6 pack after work level of drinking. Recently that level has been as high as a 12 pack a day of strong, high alcohol microbrews plus I have become fond of drinking vodka drinks.
I have a loving wife, a happy home, and a beautiful supporting family. Recently it has dawned on me that I cannot control the amount of alcohol that passes down my throat. For instance, I will grab a beer and go out on the deck and in like a split second it seems, I am out and have to go grab another. My tolerance is scaring me so much that I felt compelled to just quit drinking all together. It seems that life would be easier if I did not have to worry about where my next drink was coming from or is 8 beers going to be enough for the night.
The other night, my wife for the first time, had a serious conversation with me about my drinking. I told her that I have been considering for sometime just giving it up all together. She was proud of me and happy that I was not defensive. I told her that I was going to give it a try.
I have always been healthy. I commute to work on bicycle. I hike and do a lot of outdoor activity. I am not overweight and anyone who saw me would be astounded to hear that I was an alcoholic. But I am to interested in being healthy and living a clean, clear and meaningful life that I feel the time has come to drop drinking altogether. I know that all of you are going to say to go to aa meetings etc etc. I do know that is good advice. But I am confident that I can quit this on my own and with my wife and family as my backbone.
I plan on expanding my excercise from just cycling, to adding running, and strong cardio workouts and also adding meditation and yoga(which my wife is strongly involved in)
other than going to aa meetings, can you all suggest any other beneficial activity that will help me stay strong and keep my focus. Oh, one torturous thing, is that I am a manager at movie theater that serves alcohol. But my theory on that is... Alcohol is everywhere. You cannot put your head in the sand and hide. I want to take the bull by the horns and be strong. Anyone who has every quit something like smoking(which I did 7 years ago) knows that you cannot hide from smoking. You must overcome it and deal with it and be stronger that it. I am just going to take this one day at a time and focus on my loving wife, our house and the knowledge that alcohol could through all that out the window. Please give me feed back if you have anything constructive to say. I need support. I truely think if I could quit a pack a day cigarrette habit, that I could also quit this drinking problem.
Thanks for hearing me out,
yewlock
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replied January 14th, 2005
Experienced User
Yewlock…
good for you! As far as I can tell, you are saying all the right things about wanting to quit drinking. I wish you luck. You do know of course that you are facing a clever, tireless and powerful foe in alcohol? I am a member of aa, have been for years, but I ain’t gonna tell you to find a meeting. I am going to tell you a bit of aa heresy though.

Somewhere near 60% of people who do manage to wrestle king alcohol to a draw, do so without aa’s help. Now that 60% takes in all other methods known to man to solve the drink problem. And they run the gambit from burying ones self in cults like scientology to going cold turkey in jail or just quitting like you are planning, and everything in between. But what most of them don’t do is perform this herculean feat all by them selves. We get sober together, we stay sick alone.

If quitting was easy, you would have just quit long before you posted your message. Maybe you can now, I hope so. But if someday, somewhere down the line, someone shoves a beer across the table at you and you just pick it up and suck it down, you will be right back where you left off. Once an alcoholic, always an alcoholic. We never learn to drink like normal men again. If that sorry day arrives, and you feel down for the count, beaten to your knees by alcohol, remember aa is the last house on the block. Our message seems to be heard most clearly by the desperate, the dying. This simple program has helped more men than any other program in existence.

Your friend
shadowalker164
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replied January 14th, 2005
Experienced User
Yewlock…
good for you! As far as I can tell, you are saying all the right things about wanting to quit drinking. I wish you luck. You do know of course that you are facing a clever, tireless and powerful foe in alcohol? I am a member of aa, have been for years, but I ain’t gonna tell you to find a meeting. I am going to tell you a bit of aa heresy though.

Somewhere near 60% of people who do manage to wrestle king alcohol to a draw, do so without aa’s help. Now that 60% takes in all other methods known to man to solve the drink problem. And they run the gambit from burying ones self in cults like scientology to going cold turkey in jail or just quitting like you are planning, and everything in between. But what most of them don’t do is perform this herculean feat all by them selves. We get sober together, we stay sick alone.

If quitting was easy, you would have just quit long before you posted your message. Maybe you can now, I hope so. But if someday, somewhere down the line, someone shoves a beer across the table at you and you just pick it up and suck it down, you will be right back where you left off. Once an alcoholic, always an alcoholic. We never learn to drink like normal men again. If that sorry day arrives, and you feel down for the count, beaten to your knees by alcohol, remember aa is the last house on the block. Our message seems to be heard most clearly by the desperate, the dying. This simple program has helped more men than any other program in existence.

Your friend
shadowalker164
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replied February 7th, 2005
You might to also try smart recovery. My counselor is suggesting it since I do not like the aa tenents--one is not powerless over alcohol, you have the will to win over it. Www.Smartrecovery.Org I think is their website. I will be oging to my first meeting this week after being in counseling for 6 weeks (and stopped drinking 7 1/2 weeks ago).
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replied February 17th, 2005
Thanks for your support and kind words.
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replied May 12th, 2005
Experienced User
Yewlock…
i was rereading your post, and was just wondering how you are doing.
You still around?

Shadowalker
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replied June 15th, 2005
Hi,
its great to know that you are determined to give up alcohol. If you are totally successfully in quitting alcohol, you'll be an inspiration to others who wanna give up but can't. I have an advice for you, if you think that quitting is becoming very difficult for you, then you may try campral this drug alongwith your determination will work wonders in helping you quit alcohol. However, its best to quit without help of any drugs whatsoever.
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replied September 8th, 2005
Good For You!
Hi, :d regardless if you have picked up a drink after your above post it's great to see how you've realized that you do have a wonderful family and home, that you have a problem and that you want to stop. Just that is breaking the pattern.
Years ago I used to be a week-end drinker, although I didn't drink daily I had to have my week-ends and I too did not know my limit. Almost 3 years ago, I decided to stop drinking. Please keep in mind that I am in no way comparing my week-end alcohol use with your daily use but i've also been dependant on pain meds from ages 17-28 and quit up until around about the same time as when I quit drinking. Mind you i've tried to quit after realizing I was addicted around the age of 20 on and off the whole time and even quit a few times only to start up again thinking i'll only have a couple. Ha!Ha right! Counsilling, treatment, thearapy, aa/na and rehab, wouldn't work for me but it may for you.Some say acupuncture, i've never tried it. For me, something inside me change, my thoughts, my feelings or maybe it was the guilt that did it, all I know is that I just didn't like who I was becoming and that my children were growing up, my family and friends were starting to worry, and although I was always home physically I felt as though I was missing everything.

They say that your thoughts change I believe it was, every 26 seconds, so if you get a craving for alcohol hang in there, it'll pass. I know the craving will come back but the longer you go without it the longer the spaces in between cravings and the cravings will become milder. A really good idea is to take up jogging, at times I throw on my running shoes and fly out the front door "going for a jog" I also joined my local ymca, but what would be better is to have a weight set at home to work out when ever you need to channel any frustration into something possitive or need to kill some time. Anything to keep busy, stay postive and feel good about yourself. They also say watch out for the 3's, the 3rd day, the 3rd week, the 3rd month. Personally on the 3rd week, I felt so good physically and mentally I didn't want to alter my thoughts and feelings so that had a big part in keeping me from slipping. I'm not saying it's all fun and easy from there but for me when the 3rd month came the worst was definitely over, with the first week being the hardest.
Now on the week-ends I enjoy talking to and spending my time with my children and I still keep very busy throughout the week and week-ends. Yes, unfortunately alcohol is everywhere and since it's legal it's all too accessable so it'll be tough but nip it in the bud, no thanx I don't drink and that's that. Be sure to make a rule that there is no alcohol allowed in your home and keep to it. Everyone will come to realize that you do not drink as they do me and they will respect that, if not who cares. As for smoking, I am going on my sixth month!

Best wishes and good luck I know you can do it! If at first you don't succeed try try again! :wink:
suzion
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replied November 12th, 2014
Experienced User
it is a very good for you and your health.
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replied December 22nd, 2014
Experienced User
it is a very good for your health
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replied December 24th, 2014
Experienced User
it is a good for you and your health.A person who is addicted for drug or alcohol. He must be totally upset by physically or mentally.
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