Medical Questions > Womens Health > Hysterectomy Forum

35 Yr Old -uterine Prolapse Grade 4, Cystocele, Rectocele

Help! I am undecided about the Dr. Recommending vaginal hysterectomy w/ a/p repair for grade 4 uterine prolapse and large cystocele and rectocele. I have a 4 yr old and a 19 mo. Old at home and wont be able to pick up children for 6-8 weeks post op. I am also worried about recovery time and not being able to do my routine for a few weeks. Is there any way at all to help this problem without surgery? Kegels? What about those pelvic floor excisers you can buy? I would love to be able to skip surgery but wonder if it would just be worse if I put it off. I am uncomfortable if I am on my feet for long periods of time and feel pressure when I am on my period. Sex can be uncomfortable at times. I am stuck and can't seem to make a decision. I feel that I can put up with being uncomfortable for a while if I need to . I just wonder if I am missing the chance to be free from the pressure, periods, and birth control. I also wonder will the surgery make incontinence a problem later. I just got control of that after 12 months post partum. I am so confused!!! Any input from anybody?
Did you find this post helpful?
First Helper mdashaw
|

replied October 6th, 2004
Hi mdashaw
i had a hysterectomy just 5 weeks ago. My problems were endometriosis and cycts on my ovaries. I don't regret it one bit. They took my ovaries which I am using hormone replacement therapy for and that is kind of diffficult to balance, but you sound miserable. The fear beforehand is worse than anything. They were able to do a vaginal one on me laproscopically, and this reduced the healing time by at least a month! Sometimes, though, this is not possible and they do just a vaginal, but I heard that this is less of a waiting period than an abdominal onebefore you can go back to general activities, although you probably know that. I read your profile and noticed you're an or nurse. I admire that. I don't know a whole lot about the situation of having to function with children afterwards.
I wish all the best for you and would encourage you to go for it! Concerning the operation. Gina
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied October 9th, 2004
Hysterectomy For Prolapse
Hi mdashaw
your story is very similar to mine. I've got 3 children - age 42 and have third degree prolapse. Pressure when standing and heavy dragging feeling also and sex can be painful in certain positions. I too am considering having hysterectomy in january 05. My doc has told me that it will inevitably have to be done. I've done a lot of research on the pros and cons but still find the decision hard to make. Fed up with this constant falling out sensation. I think the best approach is to be positive about the outcome after the surgery and look forward to getting our energy levels back and being able to do all the things we can't do at the moment.
Best of luck.
Zeus
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied January 26th, 2011
Hysterecomy is not a solution for prolapse!
I posted on another thread here... I am a 44 y.o mother of two with prolapsed bladder and uterus and have been struggling with it for 5 years, after my last child was born. Did kegal biofeedback, hormone replacement, etc. My doc. kept suggesting hysterectomy, but I just did not want to lose, what for me is an otherwise perfectly healthy organ. I did some research and from what I can tell, Hysterectomy is *not* a solution for prolapse (if all else is healthy)!! In fact, a hysterectomy can cause other problems with further prolapse down the road. (Check out the other forums here! Many women with older hysterectomies require further suspension surgeries because of subsequent prolapse.) There are many new solutions, suspension surgeries available via laparascopy, which require very little downtime. You just have to find a UroGynocologist trained in the procedures.
I just got a referral for a UroGynocologist and will be asking about his skills in these suspension procedures for me. My feeling is that it is best to get a couple of opinions and research the skills and background of your surgeon before opting for surgery. For me, I believe this laparascopic suspension surgery is probably my best option. But, I would not let them take out my uterus, unless pathology showed that it was absolutely necessary (i.e. Cancer, fibroids, etc.).
Good luck to you!
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied July 23rd, 2011
hystectomy for prolapse
I WONDER WHAT YOU HAVE DECIDED TO DO! I TOTALLY AGREE WITH YOU ABOUT HYSTERECTOMY, ITS NOT INDICATED.
I AM A PELVIC SURGEON [GYNE] AND I WOULD APPRECIATE YOUR FEED BACK
THANKS
Dr Lilla FRCOG
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied July 25th, 2011
Thank you!
Thank you for your interest! I have found a surgeon in my area who has an excellent and long track-record in this suspension surgery. I am having a Sacrocolpopexy, rectocel repair, and bladder sling, performed via an abdominal incision (as this surgeon feels the results are better than with laparascope). I also need a repair of the perineum. So this will be a rather significant surgery. But, I was relieved that my uterus would not need to be removed. It is scheduled for this September (I have to wait until my children are back in school, as the recovery will be rather time-consuming). I will definitely update here with the results, once I have the surgery. I wish more GYNs were (mine included) were better informed about this surgery. My GYN wanted to perform the hysterectomy, and when I said that I didn't want that, she referred me to a surgeon who told me that my *only* option was hysterectomy. I am so glad that I did my research and found another option. Again, thanks for your interest!
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied July 26th, 2011
I am happy that you have found an alternative to hysterectomy. I am an advocate of total pelvic floor reconstruction using MESH together with sacrospinous fixation, all done from below with no abdominal incisions. This is a minimal invasive technique which allows you to be up and about in 24 hours.
Best of luck for your surgery
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied November 9th, 2011
Hi arlilla,
It is refreshing to find a doc like you! I actually had my surgery 8 weeks ago with all repairs at one time(rectocele, perineum, a&p repair, enterocele repair, Burch procedure for cystocele, and sacral utero colpo pexy for uterine/vaginal prolapse). Since my doc. recommended an abdominal approach, I also had an abdominoplasty (tummy tuck) at the same time. And, I could not be HAPPIER with all of the results! I won't lie, it was a huge procedure, and the first week or two were rough. But, I am so glad I did it all at once!
Thanks again for your interest and for your philosophy -- I truly wish more docs. were like you!
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied June 3rd, 2012
Hysterectomy Consequences
PhillyMom, you are very lucky to have found a doctor willing to be truthful with you and truly help you. I'm happy for you:) I was not so lucky... At 46, I was diagnosed with second to third degree uterine prolapse. I had no symptoms whatsoever. Yet, the gynecologist I saw talked me into agreeing to removal of my uterus. My stomach was bloated from 29" to 45" for the first time in my life and that is the condition I sought treatment for; not uterine prolapse. However, the doctor I saw took advantage of my being depressed over my extremely bloated abdomen. He knew that my two youngest children were abducted in 1998 and that looking pregnant and having to wear maternity clothes was causing me to constantly think about my 'missing' children and he knew I was very depressed. I signed a consent for removal of my uterus only; not even possible removal of any other organ. When I arrived at the hospital two days after agreeing to removal of my uterus only; I was given a new consent form to sign which would have allowed for all six of my healthy sex organs to be removed. I refused to sign the consent and refused surgery. I asked to speak with my doctor. While waiting to speak with my doctor, a nurse (CRNA)injected Versed (a drug which causes you to have no memory of what is happening to you)into my IV and that was my last waking memory. I woke up and did not know I had even been asleep nor did I realize that I had had surgery. When I learned what had been done to me, I cried out that I wanted to die. This took place in 2007. Today, I am completely disabled and can't take care of myself. I have a long list of health problems. Before the surgery, I was perfectly healthy. My only issue was my extremely bloated abdomen. My abdomen remains bloated as if I'm pregnant; nearly five years later... And, I'm still wearing maternity clothes. My life is a nightmare. Hysterectomy is, by definition, a destructive surgery. It is rarely ever necessary. Gynecologists are surgeons. That is what they do and that is how they make their money. Unfortunately, too many are motivated by 'greed' instead of 'need' when it comes to removing women's vital sex organs. I have testified in two states (Indiana and Kentucky)regarding hysterectomy informed consent laws or lack thereof and I developed a web site wherein I warn women (and the men who love them) about the many life-long and devastating consequences of hysterectomy. Hysterectomy is not normal for the human body. Women's organs are not disposable. They are VITAL to a woman's health and well-being; physically, mentally and even spiritually.
|
Did you find this post helpful?
Must Read
Is ovarian cancer connected with ovarian cysts? What types of ovarian cancer do doctors diagnose? Get the basic facts on ovarian cancer here....
Some women are at higher risk of developing ovarian cancer. Who is in the highest risk group and what can you do to reduce risk of ovarian cancer?...
Ovarian cancer symptoms can be vague or caused by many other conditions. Learn what to look for and know when to seek help for ovarian cancer here....