Shocked

i have posted this before on one hypo site but I can't remember where so i'll post it again because I think it's very important.


I was fine until around 20 years old then I started having to eat a huge meal every 2 or 3 hours then i'd be starving again and have to keep eating and I would still lose weight, celiac disease can affect different parts of your intestines in different people so you can gain weight too (sometimes in some people the whole small intestine can be damaged over time which often causes diarrhea ). Even right before sleep i'd eat a full meal and then i'd wake up with an extremely starved feeling after only 6 or 7 hours of sleep. I'd also be very cold, sick feeling, weak, pathetic, my joints would ache and be stiff, i'd get angry easily and get very warm sometimes, have lots of headaches etc, my body temp would be as low as 94.6 some mornings and average 96 and often my hands would be white and pale and cold feeling to others, not normal for me since cold never used to bother me much and i'm a man. I switched to "healthy" stone ground whole grain wheat bread and added more fat and meat, and much less junk food but that didn't help much. I had a 3 hour pee and blood sugar test and my sugar would go up pretty normaly then drop down very fast and quickly and stay too low (my numbers are lost in my room somewhere). Then my dad found out he had celiac disease at 50 and I looked into it. It took awhile for me to change my eating habits because cutting gluten and gliadins out of your diet is hard to do.... Lots of label reading (basically don't eat anything that lists a grain on it, anything that says modified food starch without saying corn etc, distilled vinegar, and gluten) but I finally did and it took a few weeks to start feeling better because your villi (the billions of little finger things in your intestines that absorb food) have to regrow. Now i'm around 14 percent body fat 150lbs (with damaged intestines I weighed 116 at lowest) and I can go without food for 8+ hours and feel fine but a little hungry.

New studies show that more than 1 in 250 americans have celiac disease and an estimated 1 out of 20 type 1 diabetics and most don't know about it. Symptoms may or may not occur in the digestive system. For example, one person might have diarrhea and abdominal pain, while another person has irritability or depression. In fact, irritability is one of the most common symptoms in children.

The easier something is the more likely you'll do it.


One easy way to test yourself would be to make "blender soup" as I call it and eat it and a gluten free diet for a few weeks. The reason I like it so much is it's cheap, fast, easy, healthy, and gives me more time for fun instead of cooking and cleaning all the time. I use whole grain brown rice (quinoa might be best i'm going to try that next), split peas or some type of bean I like, then I add garlic gloves, onions, a lot of cold pressed extra virgin olive oil, salt etc. You can do the math if you want a precise mix of fat, carbs, protein. I use about a 30 cup pot and I just put it all in there and cook it, only adding the olive oil and anything else I think heat might harm at the last when i'm letting it cool then I mix it. When that's all done I put a little water and a fresh vegetable at the bottom of the blender then I scoop in the soup and blend on liquify with my oster 450 watt blender for 30 sec or so and then pour it into containers, some for freezing some for fridge (freezing changes the texture for some reason and makes you add more water but it's still ok, if anyone has a solution i'd like it.) I then have enough for 20 healthy meals or so I haven't actually counted but 30+ cups is a lot of food. Then if you don't feel like making something and getting dishes dirty just get a big glass of blender soup and go have fun. Also using a blender to liquify vegetables like kale, celery, brussels sprouts etc is a great way to keep the beneficial fiber in the food unlike a juicer and remember even if it doesn't taste great you can drink it down in a few seconds then eat desert.

Here is a website that tells you about celiac disease, it's actually a genetic condition and your immune system overreacts to the gluten and then harms your own instestines but it has so many symptoms they call it a disease. Also someone I know was diagnosed with "irritable bowel syndrome" and later went to a more knowledgeable doctor and found out it was celiac disease. Always get a third opinion.



Celiac.Com

good luck hope this helps someone.
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First Helper jsssonic
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Users who thank jsssonic for this post: MercyS 

replied September 12th, 2005
Hypoglycemia And Celiac
Your post interested me, because my daughter is hypoglycemic and I am wondering if she could have celiac disease too. Do you know, is hypoglycemia one of the symptoms of celiac disease? She just never feels well, despite following the diet for hypoglycemics. Dr's don't take her seriously, because she looks healthy. Her former endocrinologist had suspected she could be developing type 1 diabetes, but the blood tests for the antibodies came back negative. So, the doctor basically couldn't explain it. Then, when talking with an acquanitance who has celiac disease, I began to wonder if my daughter could have that, and that could be causing her hypoglycemia. She also has ibs, and rarely menstruates. All doctors want to do is put her on the pill to induce menstruation, without trying to determine the cause for her lack of periods. I guess when you are young, thin and active they assume there can't be anyting wrong with you. We are of northern eurpean ancestry, which I know most celiac sufferers are. Is there a link between the two conditions?
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replied January 2nd, 2006
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Possibly, but from what I know about, and I was originally tested for celiac before they found out what was wrong with me, the disease mainly causes a nutrient deficiency. I don't see how it could lead to hypoglycemia because hypoglycemia is a sugar/carbohydrate intolerance. Celiac disease is simple, the intestines can't handle gluten and the immune system attacks it, destroying the little hairs that help to digest. When this occurs, normal digestion is hindered. It is easy to test for, but I don't see a connection. There is, however, a connection between hypoglycemia and an intestinal bacteria imbalance.
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replied February 14th, 2006
a Possible Connection ...
I was diagnosed coeliac a month ago and have been following a gluten-free diet since then. In that time, I have been experiencing a lot more hypos. I had a history of reactive hypglycaemia which we managed by following a low glycaemic index diet. Unfortunately, a lot of the gluten free foods are not low gi and that could be one reason someone might experience more hypos post-diagnosis.
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replied February 14th, 2006
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If you were diagnosed before, then it makes sense. This on top of that is pretty harsh, but really you should be avoiding grains and bread products at the outset anyway. The reason you're having crashes is most certainly because of the level of carbohydrate you're probably eating. No more than 100g a day.
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replied February 14th, 2006
Low Level of Carbohydrate
That's certainly true and what I should aim for but, if I don't eat enough carbs, I hypo anyway. I'd found a good balance which kept me relatively stable and the most problematic thing since becoming coeliac is the yo-yoing sugars. I can cop the dietary changes (even though i'm a bread lover because the improvement in health is amazing) but the blood sugar rollercoaser is very unpleasant. For me, it's about eating the right carbs and i'm finding that tougher since becoming coeliac. I've tried a greater protein load but that doesn't help much. I'm consulting a dietician for an overhaul of my diet.
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replied February 14th, 2006
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It's really not hard and you'd be better off going to a nutrionist who practices wholistic medicine. Let me ask you something, have you been eating any of the following foods: lima beans, black eyed peas, all other types of beans, corn (any products you can think of), onions, cashews, peanuts, lentils, bananas, barley, any grain but buckwheat, potatoes, or any kind of pasta (even whole wheat varieties)? If so, stop immediately, that's your problem right there. That doesn't include the big ones, of course, like table sugar or dried fruit, but they're items hypoglycemics seem to tend to think wouldn't cause a problem, but they must absolutely be avoiced initially. If you had symptoms on lower carbs, it's because you dropped your carb intake to below 60g a day. Try for around 80-100g but don't go higher unless you happen to be a fairly active person. Protein should be kept around 100g a day, no more. It's best to simply get 1g per two pounds of body weight, and then a bit more. Too much is a stress on the body and you need to increase fat intake (i eat around 120g of fat per day) and water intake to counter it. Always eat meat first when you have a meal so your body gets the hyrdochloric acid in there. The best carbs you can get avoiding grain products are the following four vegetables: grape/cherry tomatoes, spagetti squash, carrots and butternut squash. They won't spike your level unless you eat way too much during the day and they have plenty of carbs. For example, one cup of butternut has 22g alone. In addition, you should be eating a variety of greens, mostly romaine lettuce (green or red) and leaf lettuce (green or red). They're the easiest to get used to as opposed to something like kale, which is pretty harsh at first, as well as having more carbohydrates.
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replied February 14th, 2006
Thank You
..For that very informative post. Lots of food for thought there (no pun intended). Obviously, still coming to grips with the coeliac bit. I haven't eaten any of the foods you mentioned except a perhaps once weekly serve of corn and rice pasta but that doesn't seem to cause the problem.
Go figure! I'll have to run this all past my endocrinologist when I see him this weekend - my hypos could also result from dropping steroid doseage (for adrenal problems). Thanks again for the very useful information.
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replied February 15th, 2006
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Sure. Just so you know, something like corn may not effect you at first. It might not even effect you for 2-3 days. I've had this happen in the past. Steroid usage for infection or what not is a bad thing to begin with considering what it does to the body, so it's like that may be contributing to it because your body has to change its chemistry again. You have adrenal problems as well? Have you been tested for, let me think what it's called, I think addison's disease?
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replied February 16th, 2006
Steroids
Perhaps I need to review my steroid doseage, although i'm loathe to increase it specifically because of the side effects you allude to. I need to get this seesawing bsl under control though.
I had low adrenal function. I had an acth stim test which showed a reasonable baseline with poor stimulation. That baseline continued to drop so I was commenced on steroids. Is it addison's? Hard to clarify after three years on steroids. Am I now steroid dependent? Absolutely. I have thyroid disease also. Thyroid/adrenal/coeliac is not an uncommon combination.
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replied February 16th, 2006
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Heavenly god, that's a lot. Addison's is something i've heard of that can cause hypoglycemia, but with the correction of the problem it goes away. But if you have low adrenal function, it's likely due to the hypoglycemia because as far as I remember, addison's is overactive adrenals. Why do they have you on steroids for adrenal problems? I've never heard of that, and my doctor always stated when I first got sick that steroids should always be a last resort.
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replied February 17th, 2006
Addisons
Autoimmune disease is the bargain disease - buy one, get one or two or three.. Free :d what can you do? I also have pernicious anaemia but i'm hoping that will resolve with the coeliac diet (along with other deficiencies).
You're thinking of cushings. Addisons is under/nil production of cortisol, hence steroids are used to replace what the body normal produces. I'm not quite sure of the physiology of the connection between low cortisol and blood glucose, but certainly taking extra steroids pushes it up.
Sorry, i've caused the thread to digress. :oops: heather
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replied February 17th, 2006
Community Volunteer
That's fine, thanks for correcting me. Wow, you have a lot of different health concerns to work out. Hmmm, there are so many different things that need to be done. What is the celiac diet you are currently on?
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replied February 17th, 2006
Basically gluten-free but I am eating very lightly currently. Things like gluten-free cereal, yoghurt, plain chicken and low-gi rice, crackers, pears, grapes, peaches. My stomach seems ultrasensitive right now so i've cut right back until it settles.
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replied February 17th, 2006
Extremely eHealthy
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replied February 17th, 2006
Community Volunteer
Crackers, rice (in any form) and grapes are big no-nos. Grapes, in fact, are one of the number one things you're not supposed to be eating. One diet i've read about says to eat no more than four to five per week. I'd bet there are numerous things you're eating that you shouldn't be. I would check health food stores as well, i've found a lot of good products there for different problems.
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replied May 11th, 2006
Celiac
Iv just found out I have celiac desease becouse I lost so much weigt iv been advised 2 eat gluten free how long dose it take to put weight bk on iv had this problen scince my labour
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replied May 11th, 2006
Community Volunteer
If you add more fat it shouldn't take long.
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replied June 8th, 2009
I have both celiac disease and hypoglycemia. I can assure you that the malabsorption of nutrients caused by the celiac disease does indeed cause problems with hypoglycemia. When you are not absorbing nutrients from food, you are not processing your food properly. Even if you eat six times a day. I have experienced much more fequent episodes of hypoglycemia since I have lost so much weight from the celiac disease.
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