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Prestigious Journal Links Marijuana to Psychotic Disorders

The Lancet Journal published a study in 2007 definitely linking psychosis later on in life with earlier Marijuana use.

Lancet. 2007 Jul 28;370(9584):319-28.
Cannabis use and risk of psychotic or affective mental health outcomes: a
systematic review.
Moore TH, Zammit S, Lingford-Hughes A, Barnes TR, Jones PB, Burke M, Lewis G.
BACKGROUND: Whether cannabis can cause psychotic or affective symptoms that
persist beyond transient intoxication is unclear. We systematically reviewed the
evidence pertaining to cannabis use and occurrence of psychotic or affective
mental health outcomes. METHODS: We searched Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO,
ISI Web of Knowledge, ISI Proceedings, ZETOC, BIOSIS, LILACS, and MEDCARIB from
their inception to September, 2006, searched reference lists of studies selected
for inclusion, and contacted experts. Studies were included if longitudinal and
population based. 35 studies from 4804 references were included. Data extraction
and quality assessment were done independently and in duplicate. FINDINGS: There
was an increased risk of any psychotic outcome in individuals who had ever used
cannabis (pooled adjusted odds ratio=1.41, 95% CI 1.20-1.65). Findings were
consistent with a dose-response effect, with greater risk in people who used
cannabis most frequently (2.09, 1.54-2.84). Results of analyses restricted to
studies of more clinically relevant psychotic disorders were similar. INTERPRETATION: The evidence
is consistent with the view that cannabis increases risk of psychotic outcomes
independently of confounding and transient intoxication effects. We conclude that there is now
sufficient evidence to warn young people that using cannabis could increase their
risk of developing a psychotic illness later in life.
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First Helper User Profile homerx
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replied January 28th, 2008
Community Volunteer
Same goes for alcohol and many if not most prescription drugs. Abuse of anything is deadly...you can eat your self to death...drink your self to death, with water! So should water be illegal? Its called control and moderation...a little common since goes a long long way! kiss
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replied January 29th, 2008
Experienced User
Most prescription drugs do not cause people to become psychotic....weed does. Most people using pot for fun couldn't care less about moderation. Those using it for medical use have no idea how much of the drug they are actually getting so they can't gauge moderation
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replied January 29th, 2008
Extremely eHealthy
The important thing to remember about that study and studies like it is the inclusion of a predisposition towards mental illness and that mj use before full brain development (at around 23) may accelerate the onset of mental illness. I posted another study on here somewhere with more detail.
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replied January 29th, 2008
Community Volunteer
Not so...I am not psychotic or mentally ill, can carry on a conversation without getting all angry and judgmental. Just because it isn't right for you doesn't make it wrong. Live and let live...its all gonna be OK...for every study showing how horrific it is there is another study debunking that story so lets just agree to disagree. Peace... Smile
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replied January 29th, 2008
Experienced User
There is no anger or judgement in quoting facts, although it is easy to see how some could incorrectly come to those conclusions.
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replied January 29th, 2008
Especially eHealthy
backpain1955 wrote:
There is no anger or judgement in quoting facts, although it is easy to see how some could incorrectly come to those conclusions.

What everyone like you forgets is that the use of ANY drug in an inappropriate way before full brain development can lead to mental illnesses. It's dumb to make marijuana a scape-goat or to somehow imply it is different.
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replied January 29th, 2008
Experienced User
Can you support such a statement with facts? ANY drug? Really!!!! That would come as quite a suprise to most pediatricians and obstetricians in America!!!
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replied January 29th, 2008
Especially eHealthy
backpain1955 wrote:
Can you support such a statement with facts? ANY drug? Really!!!! That would come as quite a suprise to most pediatricians and obstetricians in America!!!

ABUSE of any drug. Not just USE. ABUSE.
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replied January 29th, 2008
Experienced User
Can you support that statement with fact? ANY drug being abused causes mental illness if used before full brain development? I would love to see the facts....please indulge me with your medical references on such a sweeping statement.
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replied January 29th, 2008
Community Volunteer
Eiri, its like talking to a brick wall. He is algonsdoc's friend so I am done with him. He has commented to all her posts positively and all mine negatively so there ya go...they are messing with me so I am gonna take my marbles and go home... Rolling Eyes And by the way, ABUSE is not the same as USE, just like Eiri stated...
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replied January 29th, 2008
Especially eHealthy
Let's pick something mundane like Asprin. What drug would you like to research? I bet the abuse of asprin in a young child/teen into the adult years could have an affect on the brain - not to mention the rest of their body.
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replied January 29th, 2008
Experienced User
If abuse of any drug leads to mental illness prior to full brain development, would it be possible to demonstrate this with say....phenergan? This drug is commonly used in pediatric patients and sometimes overused, but I can't find anything about it causing mental illness. The brain doesn't stop developing until well after birth...
Phenergan is also used during pregnancy during the brain development of the fetus. Is there any evidence this causes mental illness?
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replied January 29th, 2008
Especially eHealthy
Marijuana is a drug that is used over an extended period of time, and the brain doesn't stop developing until young adulthood to my knowledge, a heck of a long time after birth.

And to be honest, before we get to far into this cowpile, what I meant by "drug" was extacy, anti-psychotics, etc. Powerful mind-altering drugs, both legal and non-legal. I don't know what school of drugs to label them as, but "any mind altering drug, both legal and non legal, when abused, can potentially cause the development of a mental illness".
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replied January 29th, 2008
Experienced User
Certainly illegal drugs can do this. But what about narcotics? Is there any evidence these cause mental illness when used before brain development? They certainly are mind altering just as is phenergan. My point is that when one speaks in broad sweeping generalizations in order to make their point, they are usually incorrect. A more accurate statement would be that specific illicit and licit drugs, whether used appropriately or not, may in some cases cause certain types of mental illness.
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replied January 29th, 2008
Especially eHealthy
It still proves my point. Marijuana isn't the only thing on the planet that does this; so why is it the scapegoat?
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replied January 29th, 2008
Experienced User
Marijuana should stand on its own merits as a medical drug, and if the evidence exists that the harm outweighs the good, then it would go the way of hundreds of other drugs in development by pharmaceutical companies every year. Unfortunately, it simultaneously exists as a drug of abuse used solely for recreational purposes. If medical marijuana were legalized in a form that did not cause additional harm (not smoking it), then I think many people that now oppose its legalization would become strong proponents. But it is the incessant cries of the drug culture to legalize all drugs including unrestricted use of marijuana for purposes of getting high that are troubling to many. The two messages somehow become intermingled on forum discussion groups and in front of congress and government regulators, who quickly back away from the very hot issue that is political poison. We definitely need more research into use of marijuana as a safely administered drug for medical use. It will take a change in political will to permit that to happen....perhaps the winds of change are blowing in that direction.
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replied October 31st, 2011
Marijuana and Psychotic Disorders
Strange how the argument goes on.. Marijuana is a drug... in some country it is class A, some Class B and Some Class C.. Now Although it is not as harmful as heroin or other strong drug... but using in over a long period does cause Psychotic Disorders..and reduce mental ability to learn and remember things properly.. From experience asking opinion anyone who takes marijuana regularly is a waste of time.. because they will say no side effect. It is the people around them knows the effect while they are addicted and does not want to admit or do no realised it.
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replied August 25th, 2012
Marijuana is less addictive than caffeiene, Proven.
If marijuana causes psychotic disorders, shouldnt more people be having psychotic episodes? especially since marijuana use is probalbly at an all time high!(no pun inended lol)

Assessing the impact of cannabis use on trends in diagnosed schizophrenia in the United Kingdom from 1996 to 2005
Martin Frishera, , ,
Ilana Cromeb, ,
Orsolina Martinoa, ,
Peter Croftc,
a Department of Medicines Management, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, United Kingdom
b Academic Psychiatry Unit, Keele University Medical School, Harplands Hospital, Hilton Road, Staffordshire, ST6 4TH, United Kingdom
c Primary Care Sciences Research Centre, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, United Kingdom
Received 17 April 2009. Revised 27 May 2009. Accepted 30 May 2009. Available online 27 June 2009
A recent systematic review concluded that cannabis use increases risk of psychotic outcomes independently of confounding and transient intoxication effects. Furthermore, a model of the association between cannabis use and schizophrenia indicated that the incidence and prevalence of schizophrenia would increase from 1990 onwards. The model is based on three factors: a) increased relative risk of psychotic outcomes for frequent cannabis users compared to those who have never used cannabis between 1.8 and 3.1, b) a substantial rise in UK cannabis use from the mid-1970s and c) elevated risk of 20 years from first use of cannabis. This paper investigates whether this has occurred in the UK by examining trends in the annual prevalence and incidence of schizophrenia and psychoses, as measured by diagnosed cases from 1996 to 2005. Retrospective analysis of the General Practice Research Database (GPRD) was conducted for 183 practices in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. The study cohort comprised almost 600,000 patients each year, representing approximately 2.3% of the UK population aged 16 to 44. Between 1996 and 2005 the incidence and prevalence of schizophrenia and psychoses were either stable or declining. Explanations other than a genuine stability or decline were considered, but appeared less plausible. In conclusion, this study did not find any evidence of increasing schizophrenia or psychoses in the general population from 1996 to 2005.
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