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Chest pain only while running (Page 2)


March 17th, 2010
Asthma?
I have the same problem!! I am a 21 year old female and after a minute or two of jogging on pavement have chest pain ESPECIALLY when i try to take a deep breath. It doesn't happen when using a bike or elliptical and seems to be worse with cold weather. Could it be asthma?
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replied April 2nd, 2010
Chest Pains Solved
I''m a 27 year old male and I get a clenching pain where my heart is when I run. The pain starts up and after a minute or two of running, but stop as soon as I stop.

I''m in good shape and exercise regularly. I''ve been training for a race, so I''ve been experimenting with different approaches, trying to get to the bottom of it.

I went to see a doctor about this problem years ago and he said that for where I was feeling pain, even though it''s where my heart is, it''s not my heart, it''s my lungs.

A friend of mine told me that it''s probably the cold air (it is early spring in Canada after all). So I tried running on a treadmill inside, but I still had pain.

Another friend told me it''s because of the motion of my arms, that I''m causing a cramp in my chest. He recommended I stretch my arms well before running and insisted that if I didn''t move my arms while running, I wouldn''t get the pain. I tried both and neither worked.

A few years ago, I ran with a roommate who trained on a professional soccer team. He suggested I breathe a certain way when I run: rhythmically two strong breaths in, two strong breaths out. I believe it''s in through the nose, out through the mouth. I tried this today and it worked. As long as I kept that breathing, the pain didn''t come.

Anyway, it sounds like different posters have different problems (mine''s not in the centre of my chest), so this isn''t an answer for everyone. But it looks like I''ll be ready for race day!
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replied April 7th, 2011
Time to get see another doctor.
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replied May 12th, 2011
The same symptoms after 800m running it does not matter of pace. After further 1 km distance add elbow discomfort. I lasts 6 month. All endurance and respiratory test ok. Last distance is to check Chlamydia pneumoniae presence in my lungs. If negative I can t run anymore because I suffer a lot.

Alex
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replied April 6th, 2010
Jogging = bad | everything else is good
Hey!

I''m glad to find out that other poeple are going trought this mystical "illness" too Smile I too experience quite crushing chest pain when jogging ~30 minutes or more. The trigger is time, not the level of stress so it''s quite weird. I NEVER experience it when cycling, skating, gym etc - not even on 15 minutes long high speed runs.

One interesting fact is that it has been bothering me from the age of 24 till this day (26yo now), never before that. Wonder if there''s some common trigger for this?
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replied April 13th, 2010
CO2 and O2 oxygenation appear to be the issue at hand.
i would firstly like to thank ''Artour'' for his detailed post on CO2 and breathing, it makes perfect sense to me.

i am a 35yr old male and i have had this condition since 16. i have avoided any form of strenuous exercise because of the pain that appears in the centre of my chest after a few minutes. My doctor tells me it is it the chest muscle ''cramping'' due to lack of oxygenation, which is due to the CO2 escaping from my body too quickly and consequently my PH level in the blood is too high.

I am now about to go into the police academy and obviously i have to be of a certain fitness level. i have to be able to run 3.5kms to start and up to 6.5kms. i cannot run 1km without getting this pain in my chest which basically stops me in my tracks. I do however breathe through my mouth because i find when i try and breathe through my nose that i simply cannot get enough air into my lungs via nose only... however about 1 minute after breathing through my mouth, the pain comes.

it is very frustrating and in every other respect i am quite fit. I am taking symbicort day and night as my doctor diagnosed me with asthma, I don''t believe I do have asthma as I have never had an attack, but I do believe it has to do with my breathing technique. (asthma meds do not help the chest pain, only rest or walking stops it after 5-10 mins).

I can hold my breath for about 20s after a normal exhale, which suggests that my body is not very O2 oxygenated...

I do intend to overcome this but breathing through the nose 24/7 is going to be extremely difficult, it will be hard to undo almost 20 years of mouth breathing...
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replied April 14th, 2010
Nose Breathing - Take 1
Hey!

So far so good. Tried out the nose-breathing technique and didn''t get no chest pain. Hope this wasn''t just something random phenomenon! Although breathing trough the nose does seem difficult at first, I almost got used to it in the last kilometers of the run Smile

-Bach (26yo,male)
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replied June 1st, 2010
---
Artour, thank you. Have been having this problem for years (I have now been going on a "ask the internet my random problems spree." And: sincerely, recommend it.)

Anyone who should have, and didn't, read that response is undeserving of the help. Please, Artour, don't apologize for writing long and helpful responses when you know they are helpful. It compromises your integrity by coming down to their benign standard of wishing their problems away.
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replied June 12th, 2010
Chest pain no more
I took your advice and only breathed through my nose. It really did work! What you were saying made sense. I have struggled with this since junior high and I'm 33 now. I have always had chest pains while running and on the elliptical only during high intensity workouts. People should definalty give it a try. Artur knows what he's talking about. Thanks so much for your in depth and very educational reply.
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replied July 15th, 2010
First, what constitutes YOUR "chest" pain. What is the "chest" (with respect to YOUR pain)?

Is the pain in your muscles? If so, which? The bigger chest muscles, or is it in between the ribs? Or is the pain in your lungs?

What other pain does it remind you of? The pain of a bad chest cold upon coughing? Or the pain of the day after having done too much upper body work at the gym?

How is you posture, seated, standing and on the run?

One thing you could try is doing some chest expansion exercises (not to expand the chest per se, but to stretch its easy capacity for filling with air). Also stretch the diaphragm, when at rest (and on the run if you can), by belly breathing, i.e., breathe in and out rythymically through you nose, but instead of raising your shoulders (breathing using the top of the lungs), pretend that your belly is a bellows, expanding and going out on the inhale, and shrinking and going in on the exhale (diaphragm going down and up).

Listen to the good Doctor (censored - aka Artour - he knows what he's talking about (search him out, web and youtube). Never breathe through your mouth. Tape it shut at night with a little piece of micropore tape. Run more slowly if you have to, but breathe exclusively through the nose 24/7. Research the Bohr Effect. It'll gve you a new outlook on the myth of "deep breathing" and "carbon dioxide as a waste product". CO2 is far from being a waste product. It is necessary for many physiological functions.

After two years of LSD running, breathing exclusively through my nose (lots more before that with my mouth open), I've lately progressed to running intervals (I run the same overall time and distance, but I do it as intervals), still breathing exclusively through my nose. And not easy intervals either. Tough, almost sprint intervals for up to 300m at a time on the fast part, with whatever recovery I require (nose-breathing). I've found that my recovery period is about the same as it was when I used to do intervals breathing through nose and mouth. Consider that. I can now recover after almost an all out sprint at a slow jog breathing exculsively through my nose. Then do another one... etc.

If I can do that (now), you can run at an easy pace exclusively nose-breathing. All it takes is practice and building back up to your old pace, if necessary.

I haven't forgotten that the topic is chest pain. I just think it's all inter-related.
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replied July 30th, 2010
The throat thing is from the cold air. I have been in the Army for 8 years and have run in all sorts of environments and the scratchy throat things from cold air. You may also cough a lot afterwords if it is cold enough. Also running uses more energy than an elliptical and if you are slightly dehydrated you will get aches and chest pains in your body.
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replied July 31st, 2010
Thanks!
I am really glad I found these postings. I am a 20 year old male, in the Army and in good shape. I OCCASIONALLY get these chest pains, usually within the first mile or so, then it goes away. If I run 2 miles for my PT test, I have absolutely no problem. If I get on a treadmil and run 3 miles, after the first half mile I get these pains. I am convinced that it is the CO2 problem and as soon as I run again I will try breathing more through my nose. I do not think; however, that I will be able to breath only through my nose while running. Many times we run 5-6 miles at a 7.5-8 minute/mile pace and it leaves me gasping for air (I am not a runner's build, more of a weightlifters). I can stay in formation while running these runs, but only if I breath through my mouth. Anyways, thanks for the information, and I will be sure to try it out!
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replied August 9th, 2010
Chances are you may not be breathing properly during your exercise. Try to look for effective breathing techniques when running. They should improve your chest pain when running. But if all else fails, consider going to the doctor instead. It's the safest and sure fire way to go.
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replied August 11th, 2010
Chest pain while and after working out.
please check weather you are breathing through both the holes of your nose. this commonly happens because the inner walls of your nose may be slightly bent and you will be breathing through only 1 hole of your nose and when you work out, you will tend to inhale more oxygen and either side of your chest will start paining.

Just stand infront of a mirror with a torch light and check both the holes of your nose weather any hole is blocked. if any hole of your nose is blocked, then make sure that you consult an E.N.T. specialist.
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replied August 21st, 2010
chest pains while running
hey im a kid who has been running and cold air is not the problem because i have never lived anywere that has ever even snowed and i found the same problems when i train for track were I get pains in my left rib and its starting to be painful in my right rib as well. But what I do is usually cause more pain to it like pressing down on it with my fist and it has worked every time exept twice and i dont know if that is the right way to deal with it or not. Im also breathing properly... in through the nose out through the mouth,and if i breathe to fast i get a pain in my right arm Also My parents car says the distance of 4miles that i run but my nike+ipod seems to say almost 2 miles more, is the nike+ipod right or is the car right?
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replied September 4th, 2010
Chest pain only when running
People, thanks so much for all this sharing of information. I'm very fit (having rowed and played rugby at high levels) but get a pain in the top left of my chest when I start running. I've convinced myself that it's muscular and not heart related because when I hold my breath the pain recedes. So it makes sense that increasing CO2 levels in the blood actually increases O2 distribution. I'm going to run tomorrow and try the nose thing - I cross my fingers that it works and it puts an end to this uncomfortable conundrum. Again, thank you.
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replied September 7th, 2010
chest pain while runing
Very grateful for this thread! I have been suffering with severe chest pain while running for over 20 years. Consequently, I never really ran much because of it. This is as good as money in the bank.

I would suggest one thing however, for those suffering with chest pain. I would still go to the doctor to ensure you do not have any other potential medical issues. Breathing may be only one part of a combination of issues. Heart disease runs in my family, so when I was experiencing chest pains, I went and got checked out.
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replied May 5th, 2011
Chest Pain
I am 53 years old and have been running for 34 years. About 18 months ago I started having chest pain while I run. The pain does not go away until later in the evening. I have had every test imaginable! Heart and lungs are perfect. So is everything else. Now the doctor is thinking acid reflux. I take meds for hypertension, other than that no other medical problems. VERY FRUSTRATING! Any ideas? thanks, Robert
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replied May 10th, 2011
Proper Workout Plan
I also experienced the same thing. I told my cardiologist about this one and he told me to take a rest whenever chest pain occurs. This is possibly due to CO2 level alteration and cold air which constricts the cardiac arteries.
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replied May 21st, 2011
Chest pain when running
I have had the same problem for as long as I can remember...I am a 39 yr old male. I exercise all the time, play many sports, and run frequently. My pain usually comes only when I am jogging and after I have been running for a while. It also usually starts when I attempt to take a full breath. I have always been a mouth breather due to having asthma as a child. I live on the equator now so it is def. not cold weather Wink I'll try the nose breathing and hope it works. Thanks for the advice!
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replied May 24th, 2011
Burning pain
Hi guys,

I just completed a 3km run and my chest is burning and I can taste blood in my mouth, I only breath from my mouth however tried to use my nose but found it extremely difficult. I am reasonably fit. I run just about every day but took yesterday off due to tight calfs from previous 10km run. Weather tonight was extremely cold and now am certain that chest pain and burning taste of blood is caused by 4 things.

1. Cold weather
2. Fitness levels poor
3. Pushing body above ones threshold
4. Being Station and entering intense training program
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replied June 26th, 2011
SIMILAR CHEST PAIN
IM, 19 YEARS AND I HAVE ALWAYS BEEN A PHYYSICALLY ACTIVE PERSON. I DANCE DID GYMNASTICS AND NETBALL. A YEAR AGO I STOPPED EXERCISING, I HAVE A CHILD, AND AFTER THAT ONCE I TRY TO WORK OUT I GET CHEST PAINS... IT FEELS LIKE I AM STRAINING MY CHEST AND THIS JUST HAPPENS AFTER ABOUT 5MINUTES. IT WOULD BE NICE TO GET SOME FEEDBACK... I LIVE IN THE CARIBBEAN A VERY HOT PLACE.
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replied September 10th, 2011
I have the same thing. I'm 20. I've had it for many years. It only happens when I run. Any other activity doesn't induce it. When I run, I get a pain in my chest, and my saliva starts to taste sour. I don't get "out of breath," but my chest starts to tense up and I stop running because it hurts. It might be ANGINA, I'm not sure. My doctor doesn't care to check because she thinks that because I'm young, I'll be fine. Unbelievable. I am a very active person, and I notice that this happens to mostly active people.
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