Medical Questions > Conditions and Diseases > Muscular and Nerve Disorders Forum

how to relax pelvic floor muscles from spasms (Page 2)


September 7th, 2011
PFD recurrence after vaginal birth
Hi all, I had a UTI back in 2004 that I attempted to treat "naturally" (I was working at a natural grocer at the time and uninsured). I was going through A LOT of stress during the time (we discovered that we had bed bugs in our new apt.--this was before they became so trendy! Wink ). The natural remedy must have worked because when I finally gave up and went to a clinic seeking treatment, they told me I didn't have a UTI. However, I was experiencing all the typical symptoms (I had a history of recurring UTIs). I went to another OB/GYN and a urologist but neither could identify my problem. I did some research on the internet and decided that I must have IC, but my urologist was not convinced. He agreed to do a bladder distention to check out the lining of my bladder walls and again found nothing. I continued to attempt to treat myself for IC through an elimination diet, which caused me to lose an extreme amount of weight. Finally I found a doctor (I think it was a urogynocologist) who did a thorough exam and determined that I was suffering from muscle spasms. I don't recall being put on any medication, but I did go to an acupuncturist and started taking yoga classes to relax. Eventually (~a few months later?) the pain disappeared and I was back to normal.

Ten days ago, I gave birth to my first child, a gorgeous baby girl. It was a very long, tough labor and I did end up with a minor tear. I have been very sore for the past week, and things seem to be getting worse rather than better. Three days ago, I began feeling the symptoms of a UTI, which I had been told might occur as a result of having a catheter during the delivery process. However,my urine tested negative for a UTI. I am pretty sure what I have here is a recurrence of PFD (BTW--it was never labelled as such by a doctor, but that's basically what it is from what I've read.) I am really nervous about how this is going to affect my recovery and potential for post-partum depression. I am also nervous about taking meds for it since I am breastfeeding. So far my only relief is sitting on a donut pillow all day, sleeping with a heated rice sock or heating pad between my legs, and warm baths (though its difficult to find time for those with my hungry little one needing constant attention!) I am afraid to stretch because of my stitches. I am waiting to hear back from my midwife to see what she suggests. I may end up going back to a urogynocologist again.
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replied October 24th, 2011
I have had pelvic floor dysfunction for about 2 years now, what I have found that has helped alot is I bought a dildo that goes from small to big and i use that to stretch out my muscles i also use a g-spot dildo which is curved , you use that to release the tension inside the vagina , if your pelvic floor is too tight then this will hurt at the begining but atleast it will tell you that you do actually have pelvic floor dysfunction.
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replied March 8th, 2012
hmm thats interesting...my problem is after doing kegels..yes kegels which are suppossed to help these muslces..i had the urge to pee all the time...right after i pee..like a constant sensation and some tightening in my pelvic area (stomach area) i might try that to see if mine are tight?? idk..im confused ab who to ask. should i ask my obgyn?? this has been going on for a month now and it sucks really bad.
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replied May 25th, 2012
response to Kegels
Bethany2nirvana, if you think you have a short tight pelvic floor, be very careful doing kegels exercises. You may inadvertently make your muscles tighter! you want to focus on the relaxing/release part of the kegel. A urogynecologist could help you diagnosis this and recommend proper treatment.
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replied November 22nd, 2011
Wow. No idea so many people have this problem. Mine is a little different and strange... I only become constipated and have intestinal issues after I have an orgasm. Anyone else have this problem?
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replied November 23rd, 2011
Pelvic floor
Hey im a guy im 20 years old I also have this problem with the pelvic flloor I have been having it for a long time but I had no idea it was the pelvic floor because it is hard to locate, I have seen many different kind of doctors and they said it's stress.

I did acupuncture and this realllllly helped me I felt like a god after but then after a week or two the muscle started to get tight again and it gets really hard to release it, so they told me the problem is in my head , I need to resolve stress with something and doing acupuncture time to time really helps because even if it comes back after a while I thing it is important to feel good for a while so you don't get too much used to the pain, and I also try to realease the muscle during the day even if its soooo hard, being a man I can't do a local massage I don't really like putting my finger in my anus so I rather not do that but for girls it must be easier threw the vagina.

So my advice is Acuponcture + Whatever helps you to relax + anytime you notice that its tighten try to release it!!
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replied January 15th, 2012
stanford protocol
You all should check out the Stanford Protocol. It may answer a lot of your questions Smile
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replied February 7th, 2012
As a male, this sounds like my issues I have had since I was 20 and I had a kidney stone and everything went south from there. 7 Urologists, interstim (which did not work, don't do it) massage therapy which helped some, but by insurance would not cover many sessions, warm baths, various medications to relax muscles (Valium helped a litte, then again, so does getting very drunk) TENS therapy (I bought a small electrical stimulator just to see) botox injections and an overactive bladder from the start...no libido, getting up constantly at night...Libido pills do help that aspect, but the flow and numbness from the tightness tends to kill the pleasure regardless.

Pelvic floor stretches, some massages and even forcing reverse kegels (which are near impossible to do for me with this condition)and managing my fluid intake every day seems to help a little, but...one thing is that Poly Neuropathy has set in almost 20 years later in my legs/feet. Perhaps they are somehow related. I'm very young for it and they have no idea what is causing it. So now I'm also weaker with poor balance. It's very frustrating as most doctors won't even deal with me anymore.

If there is a positive, hey at least I'm in good shape. I just feel like I'm sitting on a knot and my PFMuscles are always in the closed position. I honestly describe it as having a 24 hour semi-painful erection in my sitting muscles. As a male it mimics many prostatitis symptoms: low flow, stop and start, getting up several times at night... however, my prostate has always been normal. It's just something I live with these days. Unfortunately.

Be wary of the Stanford Protocol people. It's pretty much a group trying to cash-in on others suffering. Those that truly want to help don't ask you to buy something in order to get an answer.
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replied March 21st, 2012
Pelvic floor dysfunction - a solution that works!
Great forum here! (43 year old male) I HAD all of these symptoms for quite a long time, to the point last June that it was nearly unbearable. Following intercourse, the spasms would get so bad that I had all but given up on such things. I went to a local urologist and went through a series of tests to rule out other things and was ultimately referred to a physical therapist.
While awkward and a bit disturbing, the therapy worked wonders. Along with the trigger point therapy, I was fortunate enough to have used an Interferential unit. It is similar to a TENS unit.
If ever spasms start now, simply using the unit for 30 minutes seems to stop all spasms and they stay gone.
This thing is great. No more meds, no physical therapy, just the IF unit and maybe a heating pad to go with it.
Symptom free now for over six months and loving it!
Good luck!
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replied May 7th, 2012
I am a 58 yo old male with a "raised pelvic floor" as my therapist expresses it. She is in the Chicago suburbs. She indicates the issue is to get the pelvic floor to drop and therefore release the tension. I am on visit number 7 and have all the sypmtons discussed here, straining, fecal urge, etc. She is doing exterior massage and internal work now also as of visit number 6. The effort again is to DROP THE PELVIC FLOOR. Oh, and she has me standing at a PC all day, no more sitting.
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replied October 3rd, 2012
Share
Can you share who your pt is? I'm in libertyville and have had PDF for years
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replied July 21st, 2012
I have had really bad pelvic floor disfunction for around 10 years now im a male of 28, it affected me really badly i got it when i was 18yrs old and i couldnt have sex it was really painfull and it just tensed up and i started getting premature ejaculation, I still cant have sex properly now, its also disfigured my penis after over tensing over the years and i cant get a comfortable erection. I only found out what i had about 2years ago by doing my own research, id been going to urologists for over 5years and theyd been treating me for all sorts of different problems, mostly bacterial Prostatitis, narrowing of the urethra, i had 3 operations for different things and i still had the original problem. It sent me crazy, i went on antidepressants because i just didnt know what was wrong with me and doctors just kept sending me away saying it was in my head. When i found out that i had PFD myself i had to persuade my urologist i had it then he sent me to a specialst who still traeting me wrong, she was making me do kegel exersizes which are for strengthening the muscles and can do make ur muscles tighter. By doing more research on the internet i stumbled across a book called a headache in the pelvis and after reading it i felt like that book was wrote about me.....it was crazy, saying about how urologists miss the problem and operate for different things. In the book it explains a treatment method which includes trigger point release and relaxation and teaching the muscles to relax so they can start healing themselves and get back to normal. I stongly recommend anyone who had this problem to read this book, its helped me soo much! Im still not back to normal yet as i find it extremely difficult with everyday life to relax and im very anxious person. But my life was basically ruined from this horrible unknown problem, no one understood me and i felt like dying. I just wanted to share my story and hope it helps, One day i will be curedd lol i hope
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replied August 27th, 2012
PFD book
What is the name of the book?
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replied October 7th, 2012
headache in the pelvis
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replied October 7th, 2012
headache in the pelvis
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replied May 1st, 2013
Hi, would u happen to know if the book can be downloaded somewhere on the net?
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replied July 30th, 2012
This condition is manageable! I have been undergoing trigger-point PT for pelvic-floor dysfunction and doing PT-prescribed exercises on and off for 3 years. I'm happy to say that it's definitely possible to get things under control to the point where I live a normal, active life and visit my PT only every 6 weeks or so. When I'm having a flare-up (which is more common in hot weather), I sit on a donut cushion with an ice pack in the middle. Ice dulls the pain in the moment and seems to have a longer-lasting anti-inflammatory effect as well. I sit on ice packs in the car in the summer (avoiding sitting on a hot car seat in summer helps avoid a flare) and I've even brought ice packs to sit on on planes. (I have a note from my PT and declare the ice packs at security, and have never had a problem.) I used to be worried about the hassle or embarrassment of dealing with the ice, but since having it makes me feel so much better, I've decided to just welcome it as a soothing way to take care of myself. Oh, and DEFINITELY keep constipation under control and do NOT strain. My doc recommended magnesium citrate, and I vary the dosage to get just the right effect.
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replied August 16th, 2012
Pelvic floor and torso spasms
I've been suffering from a variety of spasms throughout my torso for over a year. I finally contacted a surgeon that operated on me in 1998 and explained my problems. He told me about findings in research since 1998 that have shown the enormous value of pelvic floor physical therapy. Desperate I flew from one coast to the other and am presently going through intensive pelvic floor therapy. My spasms have already been reduced not only in the pelvic area but the stomach and upper back as well. Look at the image of a muscular skeletal diagram in your drs office and you will understand how physical manipulation can help. It is already wonderful and I have just begun.
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replied October 12th, 2012
Pelvic Pain - Levator Ani Syndrome
I'm a 34 year old male and I'm commenting here to relate my symptoms and to state what remedies I tried, and what ended up helping me. I have been experiencing sharp lower pelvic area (anal, bladder, parineal) pain on and off for about two years, sometimes suicidally excruciating and sometimes very mild. I believe mine was more a diagnosis of severe levator ani syndrome. I visited an MD once and had blood work and a CAT scan done. The doctor found nothing wrong with me and just recommended a proctologist. I then took it upon myself to research every natural cure that I could find, massage, meditation, stretching, supplementation (magnesium, calcium, vitamin D, potassium, etc.) and nothing worked; although the supplements increased my energy level so I must have been a little deficient. Anyway, what ended up helping me was so simple and natural; Deep Breathing or "Belly" breathing. After reading an article about deep breathing I began to explore it more on the internet and after trying it for a few days, and consciously making it a more normal style of breathing for myself, I began to realize that for a portion of my life I had been tensing, now unconsciously so, the muscles in my lower abdomen and upper pelvis. I don't know exactly how this tensing started but it could be partially due to the sucking in of my stomach as I gained a few pounds over the years. In America today flat stomachs are enviable and the "in thing" so there is a lot of stress to appear fit. So anyway, after just a week or so of deep breathing and slowly breathing into, and relaxing, these now subconsciously tight muscles down there I noticed that it was like a domino effect and all the muscles of my lower abdomen and pelvis began to slowly relax. I hadn't even realized that I was tightening these muscles for years, it had become subconscious. It has been a month since I began the deep breathing and it has only gotten better. I still get occasional hints of pain, which I attribute to maybe little knots still in the muscles from years of tightening, but I am much better. My life is back to normal.

I just wanted to share that because I know how debilitating, terrible, and depressing it can be to live with this sort of pain. It was chronic for me and it was ruining my life. In the end I believe if nurtured and given our conscious attention (to release tension) our bodies will work well, heal well, and remain pain free.

Best wishes to everyone Smile
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replied October 28th, 2012
Fred: thank you for your comments. I am a 60 year old male who has suffered off and on for about 20 years not knowing the cause. It was always basically the same symtoms but I was never diagnosed with pelvic floor syndrome. I had seen the realm of doctors, physical therapists, chiropractors, etc. and no one ever gave me this diagnosis. It was only recently after reading Headache in the Pelvis (by David Wise) that I was able to put two and two together. I have started doing the external trigger point releases and following the recommended stretching program. I am going to the Cleveland Clinic this Thursday to work with a PT on internal trigger point releases. HOWEVER, I can truly identify with your analysis of "sucking in the stomach" as I have done so probably most of my adult life. I am going to give your suggestion a good try of "belly breathing". Can you recommend any sites that guided you the best or are they all basically the same?
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replied October 31st, 2012
Hey WingDen,

I don't remember the exact sites I visited to learn about deep/belly breathing, I just used google and read a bunch of sites on the topic. It's also called abdominal breathing and it is our natural breathing style when we allow our abdomens to relax.

I have also read "A Headache In the Pelvis" and I found it to be very helpful, especially the trigger point concepts. However, for me the "release" technique the book professes, which is pressing a trigger point for a minute or so, didn't work as good for me as just firmly and vigorously massaging the tight areas. I encourage you to research other trigger point release methods online if you are not getting results with the books method. Most of my trigger points were in my lower abdomen, so I would use nightly trigger point release and massage of my lower abdomen plus the deep breathing, which eventually relaxed my pelvis ALOT more. It can take a few weeks to get used to relaxing these muscles. Also when you're going about your day try to remember to consciously relax the abdomen and pelvic muscles. If your doing abdominal breathing it will really help keep your lower abdomen loose and relaxed also. If your problem and symptoms are similar to mine (mostly sharp, stabbing like, pain down there) you should begin to notice a drastic improvement after a few weeks.

I don't have time right now to proof read this response so I hope it makes sense. If you have any other questions let me know. Since I know how terrible it is to live with this affliction I'm here to help if I can.

Fred
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replied November 1st, 2012
Hi Fred:
This is the second time I am entering it since I lost it while trying to reply. Again, thank you for your input. I did purchase "Headache in the Pelvis" last February and have read and re-read it several times. I had a concern last February (actually Nov. - Feb.) and I saw a PT at the Cleveland Clinic. She was the one who told me about the book and diagnosed me after all of these years. I seemed fine until the end of August when I was working in the yard using a step ladder for about 3 hours trimming a hedge. The next day I was all flared up. I did not connect the PSD with my symptoms at the time. I started doing a PT prescribed program and about the 4th week he indicated that we are dealing with the symptoms and I needed to have someone else look at me. That is when I started thinking that my hip pain was related to the PSD. I had x-rays done of the lower spine and both hips and it revealed nothing. After "chasing my tail" for about 6 weeks, I started doing the stretches prescribed in the book. I started using the tennis ball and a ball slightly smaller than a soft ball on my psoas (very important), lumborum, glutes, etc. to release trigger points. I have never had any internal trigger point release other than as part of the evaluation last Feb. by the PT at the Clinic. I am going this afternoon to the Clinic for a treatment along with my massotherapist so she can learn how to do it. We live about 1 hour and 15 minutes from the Clinic and would rather not have to make such a long trip for treatment. With regard to the belly breathing: is this something you do throughout the day now or just as you are thinking about it. I too have always been a "chest breather" trying to keep my stomach muscles tight and pulled in. I also believe this is part of my problem. I had a spot in my right cheek that no matter what I do it is always tight or a fullness feeling to it. It sits just about over the pudenal nerve. I am thinking that the pudenal nerve is being compressed because of the PSD and I am "feeling" this sensation in that area of the cheek. If I try to ignore it and sit on it, etc. it gets all fired up and I have the burning sensation then. I hope the PT today is able to address this. I have done A LOT of reading about PSD and lenghtening and loosening the pelvic floor muscles. I read a site yesterday where they suggest the same thing about the belly breathing and its relationship to lengthening the floor. Well, enough sitting for now. Will let you know how the treatment goes. THANK YOU very much for the info again and just being there. I wished there was a site where men can share there symptoms and treatments and educate other men who may no understand what they are experiencing. Considering my age of 60 and the more recent discovery of PSD, I have suffered with this way too long and would like to help others find some relief. I actually had two unnecessary surgeries in 1997 and 2000 to correct my symptoms not knowing what was actually causing them. Later my friend. Denny
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replied April 3rd, 2013
Daily walks, a short run a few times a week, yoga, meditation, getting to bed early, and a plant-based whole foods diet, preferably as much raw as possible is what has helped me.

Unfortunately when the cold Winter months come along I do not feel like going out for walks or runs or even to a yoga studio. I also feel more like eating heavy cooked foods in the Winter. I'm looking into moving someplace with a temperate climate so I can stay on top of it more easily.
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replied May 2nd, 2013
Hi, how long did it take to get the muscles ok?
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replied May 7th, 2013
Pelvic Floor Dysfunction- There is a way to fix it!!!!
I have been suffering with Pelvic Floor Dysfunction for 5 years now, and I am only 20 years old. At first it showed itself with similar symptoms to urinary tract infections, and that was all I was diagnosed with. I was given the cipro antibiotic so many times for these "UTI's" that eventually I became immune to it and now have to get stronger antibiotics for real infections. About 2 years ago, when my "UTI's" were occurring at least 4-5 times a year, I sought a specialist because I knew there was something seriously wrong. I went to a Urologist first (BIG MISTAKE). First of all, I am a 20 year old female...do you know how awkward and uncomfortable it is to go to a doctor that primarily treats elderly men?? Well it was uncomfortable enough to make me tense up during every exam, which all of you with PFD know is the worst thing you can possibly do. After about a year of exams, tests, and experimental medicine, the Urologist had no answers. He eventually just diagnosed me with Interstitial Cystitis (IC). For those of you who don't know, IC is basically a disease in which the lining of the bladder deteriorates and causes a lot of pain. The only trick about IC is that it is impossible to test for and confirm. The only definable symptoms it shows are Hunner's Ulcers (which I did not have), and even some people who have IC don't every get those ulcers. Ultimately this diagnosis was incorrect and a copout for the Urologist, because he couldn't really figure out what was wrong with me. When I was told that I would be on medicine 3 times a day for the rest of my life (remember I was only 19 years old at the time), I wasn't satisfied. My dad began to research all over the internet and finally found a Urogynecologist in Jacksonville, FL (where I live and go to school). This practice has completely changed my life (Florida Gynecology---LOOK THEM UP!!!). In the first routine visit, the doctor found my spasms and suggested Pelvic Rehab. Pelvic rehab is essentially just retraining your pelvic muscles to not spasm anymore. The way that they do this is exhausting the muscles to the point that they relax entirely. I had a series of 4 in office treatments where they hook you up to a STIM machine and essentially sent shocks into your pelvic muscles (IT DID NOT HURT ONE BIT!!!), and I also did at home exercises in between my weekly appointments. This did the trick, and I felt better for a few months. Then the worst happened, and my spasms came back. Well don't worry, because my doctors had a plan! And I now own my very own Home STIM Unit that I can use as often as I like to treat my symptoms and relax my pelvic muscles. It is about the size of my hand and runs on D batteries. Very user friendly and the nurses teach you how to do it to yourself the first time. I now go 2-3 weeks in between my home treatments and I rarely have flares. As a 20 year old, I was not prepared to live with something so difficult and life altering for the rest of my life, and this device and the doctors at Florida Urogynecology have absolutely given me the opportunity to live a more normal life. Please Please Please check this stuff out if you haven't already!
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replied May 13th, 2013
Sever case of spasms leads to passing out.
Hi,

I am a 36 yr old mom and my pelvic spasms can get so bad they trigger a vasovagal response and I nearly pass out whenever I am sitting. Has any one had this experience before? I have been to the ER 3 times and all blood work, ct scans, mri's, dopplers, ultrasounds have been normal. I have seen a GP, Gyno, immunologist, and infectious disease doc. The Gyno gave up and sent me to a women's physical therapist who finally nailed the cause. I am starting PT and would like to know if those with severe cases like mine are able to lead normal lives.

Prior to this I was training for a marathon as well as doing Tae Kwon do. I am trying to figure out if these spasms occurred from overuse or when I missed a high kick and fell on my butt or something else.
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