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Aspergers: Reaching Out

I want to tell my story. I don't have Aspergers, but I have become friends with a young man who does.

Greg came to our college with other freshman in the beginning of the fall semester. He quickly came to our club, The Storytellers' Guild. We're a gaming/anime club, and he probably felt like we all did, that he could finally fit in.

Greg was different from the moment we all met him. One of our members said part of it was due to the fact that he looked like he'd been bullied physically and emotionally on a level most people never reach. Other than that, none of us understood why Greg was so odd.

We welcomed him at first, but found his limited conversational topics to be annoying an repetitive. His quirky speech habits and physical movements confused us. We're a very open and accepting group, but even we have our limits. We gave him a chance at first, but most of us became impatient and avoided him soon after.

Shortly after many of us began verbally expressing our annoyance with Greg, a female member of the club stepped in. She said Greg hadn't old her, but she could see that he had Aspergers. She explained that it was a type of autism, and told us the symptoms. It was Greg, 100%. The best thing for someone with Aspergers is to get as much social interaction as possible in order to widen their social abilities.

So we all gave him a second chance. We re-invited him to lunches. We purposely talked to him. And you know what? He's improving! Even in one semester his conversation topics have expanded, haha. I had a conversation with him about something I'd never heard him talk about!

I'm glad Greg found our club. We are accepting of people above the normal level. Most college students would look at Greg and hear him talk and not even bother. We're nerds, and we're nice Smile It feels good we've given him a second chance and are helping him to come out of his shell. He WANTS to be around people - that's where Aspergers is different from full autism.
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replied January 11th, 2008
Especially eHealthy
This made me cry. My bro has aspergers. Thanks
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replied January 11th, 2008
Extremely eHealthy
you should have him join here. I hate the attitude of the modern day person to someone that is "different" there is a lack of understanding. IN your case you didnt know that is a different case scenario. I hate how i go to walmart and people are rude to us just because i have a special person with me.
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replied January 11th, 2008
Active User, very eHealthy
Re: Aspergers: Reaching Out
Eiri wrote:
I want to tell my story. I don't have Aspergers, but I have become friends with a young man who does.

Greg came to our college with other freshman in the beginning of the fall semester. He quickly came to our club, The Storytellers' Guild. We're a gaming/anime club, and he probably felt like we all did, that he could finally fit in.

Greg was different from the moment we all met him. One of our members said part of it was due to the fact that he looked like he'd been bullied physically and emotionally on a level most people never reach. Other than that, none of us understood why Greg was so odd.

We welcomed him at first, but found his limited conversational topics to be annoying an repetitive. His quirky speech habits and physical movements confused us. We're a very open and accepting group, but even we have our limits. We gave him a chance at first, but most of us became impatient and avoided him soon after.

Shortly after many of us began verbally expressing our annoyance with Greg, a female member of the club stepped in. She said Greg hadn't old her, but she could see that he had Aspergers. She explained that it was a type of autism, and told us the symptoms. It was Greg, 100%. The best thing for someone with Aspergers is to get as much social interaction as possible in order to widen their social abilities.

So we all gave him a second chance. We re-invited him to lunches. We purposely talked to him. And you know what? He's improving! Even in one semester his conversation topics have expanded, haha. I had a conversation with him about something I'd never heard him talk about!

I'm glad Greg found our club. We are accepting of people above the normal level. Most college students would look at Greg and hear him talk and not even bother. We're nerds, and we're nice Smile It feels good we've given him a second chance and are helping him to come out of his shell. He WANTS to be around people - that's where Aspergers is different from full autism.


That's a life-affirming story. You guys are to be lauded for your help for Greg and his Aspergers. I had not heard of this illness, only autism. If he had not found your club and been exposed to more social interaction, he might have had a much different college experience.
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replied July 1st, 2011
darlord i hope my son finds ppl like u guys thats perfect lol i broke down n reliefe for the first time n god knows how long thanx
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replied February 3rd, 2008
I'm a member of the STG and can attest to Greg's improvement.

I'll be honest, I was ready to chew out some of our members if they were mean to him but I found that people were ready to be patient with him as soon as I told them about his condition. He first opened up to me in private, when we were waiting for other members to come to an event. Greg arrived early so we had a moment to talk. This was when he told me about his high school experience and how I was the first girl to talk to him. Greg had come to me many times before to ask for academic and random advise, so I had talked to him enough times to realize that he had Aspergers. A semester ago he would only talk about Transformers: now he's interested in a variety of subjects. I asked him about his classes and I found out that his lowest grade was an A-! Greg is a smart, good person and all it took to help him was an invitation to lunch and a few movies. All he needed was to be included and treated with respect.
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replied February 3rd, 2008
Especially eHealthy
Yep! I just had a great conversation with him the other night. He's getting a lot more confident in how he speaks and in voicing his ideas; I've really noticed that once you get him going on something, he stutters less and just says what's on his mind Smile
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replied May 28th, 2009
"The best thing for someone with Aspergers is to get as much social interaction as possible in order to widen their social abilities. "

As an aspie I have to say a big thanks, I was trying to make new friends and haven't much luck so far.
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replied May 28th, 2009
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That is a great story. I'm so glad he found you guys.

Making friends is difficult for a lot of people (including myself), but Aspergers puts an extra barrier between the person and other people. Niisu: It's great that you want to make new friends. Finding people with similar interests can really make things easier. Unfortunately, outside of school, there aren't a lot of clubs and groups.

Also, I disagree with TMJWorld that it is the "modern" world that doesn't accept people who are different. I would say that it has always been that way. In fact, it is much better than it used to be. There are a lot more accepting people out there now.
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replied May 28th, 2009
Although people have a them-and-us mentality it's not as bad today, regarding ANY subject as it used to be. Here in Ireland for example Catholics and Protestants were shooting each other for centuries, now the hostility is between Catholics and atheists and the war is fought yes, still with relentless insults but without guns. Now that's real progress (or is it backwardness that we Irish just copy other people's culture while neglecting our own? Anyway, that's another story.) Sorry if this post is a little off-topic.
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