I have been strictly sugar free for a few months but recently over vacation I slipped up. It started with one chocolate dessert and kind of escalated. Seems it always happens that when I eat a bad food, I feel really great (sugar high) and then trick myself into thinking I can eat sugar again. I get really excited at the idea of eating treats and start plotting all the things I'm going to eat...it is seriously like a drug. My cravings get out of control.

Then after a few days, my ups and downs are out of control and it sort of hits me like a ton of bricks. Does anyone else have the reaction to sugar that comes after a few days rather than an immediately drop a few hours later? It's like...I can eat one thing, but that just leads to craving more and then I give in and I'm on this crazy roller coaster...anyone????
Did you find this post helpful?
|

User Profile
replied January 7th, 2008
Community Volunteer
Reactions to something bad you shouldn't have eaten usually take at least 2 days to crop up, this happened to me all the time and made it difficult to figure out what was going on until I read more about it.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied January 7th, 2008
Do you ever feel sort of hyper? Like a rush of adrenaline/panic attack? Can that be sugar related??
|
Did you find this post helpful?

User Profile
replied January 7th, 2008
Community Volunteer
Yes, definitely. That was one of my main symptoms. I would have days for example where I would feel quite able to complete any amount of work. It wasn't like mania, but definitely an excited state. It usually abated in a few hours at most and then I felt like crap. I still get excited from time to time, but it's not the same anymore, I don't have the crashes. This is also a good reason why this illness is often misdiagnosed as bi-polar. If it gets bad enough, and it was for me at one point, it will often seem like that.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied January 7th, 2008
funny.....it was right after eating a huge brownie with ice cream that I started to feel like that, but it was a very unsettling feeling.

So now you really don't feel that way anymore?

Part of my anxiety wants to talk myself into thinking that I must have some kind of disorder because the panic/anxiety feels so real, but I know it gets 1,000 times WORSE when I eat the wrong foods...and I know I can level myself out with my eating. It's so crazy how sugar for us is like a drug but then my husband can eat all the right things and his mood is 100% even keel.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied January 7th, 2008
I mean to say he can eat all the WRONG things.....
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied January 7th, 2008
By the way, I think all of this is tied into our adrenal glands and how they are so dysfunctional with the release of too much adrenaline triggered by the sugar drops. That is probably why it takes so long to feel better after following the diet - our adrenals need to normalize.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

User Profile
replied January 7th, 2008
Community Volunteer
Yes, it's been shown that the adrenals are HIGHLY taxed because of the sugar drops, so it's a symptom. And yes, I don't feel like that anymore, but I also know very well what you're talking about. When really sick, it seemed to be a symptom in itself to worry about every disease and mental illness under the sun, though I'd usually get stuck on liver cancer or schizophrenia.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied January 8th, 2008
i can completely relate - i get stuck on bipolar! i get really obsessive about it - it seems like a vicious cycle of negative thoughts. but i realize now that when i am balanced and eating right those obsessive thoughts seem to vanish. it's hard though when you're in it to see the correlation.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied January 28th, 2008
I too have been amazed at how something as simple as your DIET can affect your mental outlook. But bad moods and feelings never fail to correct themsleves whenever I eat right. I just can't kick coffee. It is my last vice.
|
Did you find this post helpful?
Quick Reply