I have had a roomate for 6 months. We are roommates, nothing else. He told me that when he was in the military he was pronounced a TB carrier. He also lied and told me that his TB could only be passed on if he was intimate and the woman got pregnant. I since have looked up TB information and am terrorfied now that I can catch TB as this man coughs all the time in my home. His coughing is awful and I thought it was due to his smoking.

He is planning on moving out of my house by the end of the month, what can I do to disinfect my home, the bathroom he used, the carpeting in his bedroom..etc. Did he lie to me about his TB or is it true that there are some who can carry it and not give it airborne? Please write me privately, I am seldom on the internet, thank you.



S
Did you find this post helpful?
First Helper Stormkloud
|

replied February 6th, 2012
TB is less contagious than other cough/cold type infections, however, prolonged contact with a coughing carier must put you at some higher risk than the background population.

Get tested. However, the tests don't seem that reliable - they are sensitive (pick up the condition), but not specific (pick up lots of false positives). Also will be positive with a past BCG immunisation!

As for decomtamination - the mycobacterium is unlikely to last more than a few hours outside a human cell/surface. so no need.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied February 6th, 2012
Experienced User
Garrick wrote:

Get tested.


I second this suggestion.

There is a chance that you caught the bacteria, which will reside in your body as "inactive TB." When your immunity/resistance is high, you will suppress the TB bacteria and function normally. You are not infectious.

However, as time goes on and you go through a high-stress/minimal sleep/poor diet situation, your immunity weakens and the TB bacteria then become active, slowly infecting and degrading healthy body tissues.

If you test positive for inactive TB, you will take a much lower combination and dosage of the regular anti-TB medication for 6 months. After that period, all your TB bacteria will have been eliminated. The greatest benefit is the peace of mind knowing that when you do undergo a low-immunity period, you won't have the deadly TB bacteria taking over your system.
|
Did you find this post helpful?
Must Read
Do you know the three main reasons we cough? Learn common causes of cough and when coughing might indicate a more serious health problem....
Coughing is normal. But what can cause more troublesome coughs? Learn more about possible causes of cough here....
When should you see a doctor about cough symptoms? When are symptoms a sign of further complications? Learn about cough symptoms basics here....