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Would You Like to Get Married Someday? (Page 1)

Would You Like To Get Married Someday?
1) Yes
2) No
3) Unsure
94%  94%  [ 16 ]
5%  5%  [ 1 ]
0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Total Votes : 17
I was just wondering what people thought about wearing the long gown and being the bride, etc., etc..

p.s. if you are already married, hit "yes".
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replied December 9th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
I want to get married, but I don't want a huge fancy wedding. I want a simple little brown and gold dress, and get married in a room with my family and a few friends, and have a nice dinner afterwards. That's it.
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replied December 9th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
That sounds beautiful. Smile
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replied December 9th, 2007
Experienced User
I am already married. We didnt have the big fancy wedding that everyone dreams of because neither of us wanted that. We both dressed the way we wanted to and had what family we could have there with us.
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replied December 9th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
i would like to get married and i'd like it to be a special event to remember and that my kids and take part in
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replied December 9th, 2007
Experienced User
I am already married. We did not have a big fancy wedding. We had a small get together with a few close family members and a few close friends in my dads back yard.
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replied December 9th, 2007
Especially eHealthy
I want to get married some day and I definitely want a bit of pomp and circumstance lol. I like celebrations and the ceremonial traditions. Nothing huge obviously, but yes a dress, and flowers, etc.
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replied December 9th, 2007
Especially eHealthy
im getting married one day
if things go as planned it will be when im 19. i want a HUGE wedding. its going to be a very big deal
my daughter would be a little over 2 yrs old. she would be the flower girl Smile
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replied December 9th, 2007
Experienced User
I'm not sure what it is about marriage to me but I am really not interested in it.

I don't know of any benefits to marriage,in my mind marriage is just one big excuse for a party.I'm not saying that it is a bad thing or a waste of money,I just don't see myself wearing the dress walking down the aisle and saying I do.
But to each there own and for all of you who want to get or are already married,Good luck to you and I wish you many happy years.
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replied December 9th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
I plan to be married someday.
It will be small, mostly because I'm a little lazy when it comes to planning things like that (graduation stuff was a disaster) and because I like the idea of a smaller wedding anyways. I'll have the whole dress and flowers thing but just close friends and family will be there.
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replied December 9th, 2007
Especially eHealthy
There are a ton of legal benefits to marriage. That to me makes it worth it.
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replied December 9th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
sweet_mom wrote:
I'm not sure what it is about marriage to me but I am really not interested in it.

I don't know of any benefits to marriage,in my mind marriage is just one big excuse for a party.I'm not saying that it is a bad thing or a waste of money,I just don't see myself wearing the dress walking down the aisle and saying I do.
But to each there own and for all of you who want to get or are already married,Good luck to you and I wish you many happy years.


I posted tons of reason for you a few weeks ago. It's one thing to acknowledge all of the benefits of marriage and then decide it's not for you, but I don't think it's right to deny they exist.

1) marriage is more than twice as strong of a bond as living together.People who make the commitment and get married stay together more than twice the rate of those who don't marry each other.

2) any property acquired while you are living together belongs only to the person who actually bought it. A stay at home mom does not own the family home boyfriend buys no matter how long they live in it. Married couples each own the entire home. If one passes away, the widow or widower inherits the entire house.

"The reality is that no matter how long the relationship lasts, where property is concerned the law still effectively treats the couple as separate individuals with no rights or responsibilities if the relationship ends The reality is that no matter how long the relationship lasts, where property is concerned the law still effectively treats the couple as separate individuals with no rights or responsibilities if the relationship ends,"

And those are just a couple of a myriad of reasons.
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replied December 9th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
Here are some more:

According to the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO), there are over a thousand federal laws that treat married people differently from single people.

Rights and benefits

* Right to many of ex- or late spouse's benefits, including:
o Social Security pension
o veteran's pensions, indemnity compensation for service-connected deaths, medical care, and nursing home care, right to burial in veterans' cemeteries, educational assistance, and housing
o survivor benefits for federal employees
o survivor benefits for spouses of longshoremen, harbor workers, railroad workers
o additional benefits to spouses of coal miners who die of black lung disease
o $100,000 to spouse of any public safety officer killed in the line of duty
o continuation of employer-sponsored health benefits
o renewal and termination rights to spouse's copyrights on death of spouse
o continued water rights of spouse in some circumstances
o payment of wages and workers compensation benefits after worker death
o making, revoking, and objecting to post-mortem anatomical gifts
* Right to benefits while married:
o employment assistance and transitional services for spouses of members being separated from military service; continued commissary privileges
o per diem payment to spouse for federal civil service employees when relocating
o Indian Health Service care for spouses of Native Americans (in some circumstances)
o sponsor husband/wife for immigration benefits
* Larger benefits under some programs if married, including:
o veteran's disability
o Supplemental Security Income
o disability payments for federal employees
o medicaid
o property tax exemption for homes of totally disabled veterans
o income tax deductions, credits, rates exemption, and estimates
* Joint and family-related rights:
o joint filing of bankruptcy permitted
o joint parenting rights, such as access to children's school records
o family visitation rights for the spouse and non-biological children, such as to visit a spouse in a hospital or prison
o next-of-kin status for emergency medical decisions or filing wrongful death claims
o custodial rights to children, shared property, child support, and alimony after divorce
o domestic violence intervention
o access to "family only" services, such as reduced rate memberships to clubs & organizations or residency in certain neighborhoods
* Preferential hiring for spouses of veterans in government jobs
* Tax-free transfer of property between spouses (including on death) and exemption from "due-on-sale" clauses.
* Special consideration to spouses of citizens and resident aliens
* Spouse's flower sales count towards meeting the eligibility for Fresh Cut Flowers and Fresh Cut Greens Promotion and Information Act
* Threats against spouses of various federal employees is a federal crime
* Right to continue living on land purchased from spouse by National Park Service when easement granted to spouse
* Court notice of probate proceedings
* Domestic violence protection orders
* Existing homestead lease continuation of rights
* Regulation of condominium sales to owner-occupants exemption
* Funeral and bereavement leave
* Joint adoption and foster care
* Joint tax filing
* Insurance licenses, coverage, eligibility, and benefits organization of mutual benefits society
* Legal status with stepchildren
* Making spousal medical decisions
* Spousal non-resident tuition deferential waiver
* Permission to make funeral arrangements for a deceased spouse, including burial or cremation
* Right of survivorship of custodial trust
* Right to change surname upon marriage
* Right to enter into prenuptial agreement
* Right to inheritance of property
* Spousal privilege in court cases (the marital confidences privilege and the spousal testimonial privilege)
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replied December 10th, 2007
Especially eHealthy
LOl whoa!
futurshock just curious...how old were you when yuo got married? were you married before your daughter? is this your first marriage? is it your husbands first too?
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replied December 10th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
I was married at 33 and had my daughter a little over a year later, at 34. First marriage.
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replied December 10th, 2007
Especially eHealthy
A very lot of your rights listed up there are outdated. Couples can get those too. Especially in today's society.

Domestic violence intervention? Dude, watch cops some night. Those couples are NEVER married and they get domestic violence intervention. In fact, couples get the same intervention as married people!

Custodial rights to children, shared property, child support, and alimony after divorce - I don't know where there is alimony anymore - but you can get this even if you live together as COMMON LAW marriage. Which is just living with the partner for a certain amount of time. Both parents have custodial rights to the children if they are on the birth certificate. Shared property means BOTH names are on it when you are unmarried. Not a difference there. Child support is child support. Women get this regardless of marriage because it is for the child - not a 'spouse'.

I could go on, but why? Wink
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replied December 10th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
I don't know where to find the info you presented, Ingi. Do you have a website I could look up?


Are you in the U.S? I should have specified that I am in the U.S., and I am referring to U.S. regulations, etc.

Common Law, I can't find any states that recognize that.
Property not in the names of both people is divided very differently between married and non-married people, check out the website below.

Alimony is still paid in certain situations when a spouse (either one) is staying at home raising the children and not currently working, etc.

For more answers,

Here is another place that shows a direct comparison:

http://family.findlaw.com/marriage/living- together/cohabitation-comparison.html
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replied December 10th, 2007
Experienced User
Ingi wrote:

Custodial rights to children, shared property, child support, and alimony after divorce - I don't know where there is alimony anymore - but you can get this even if you live together as COMMON LAW marriage. Which is just living with the partner for a certain amount of time.


Not all states have Common Law marriages anymore. And in some of the places that do have some requirements to verify if it is a true common law marriage or just people living together. One of those requirements is whether of not either party introduces themselves as husband/wife or boyfriend/girlfriend.

Here are some websites:
http://www.nolo.com/article.cfm/objectId/7 09FAEE4-ABEA-4E17-BA34836388313A3C/118/304 /192/FAQ/

n a handful of states (listed below), heterosexual couples can become legally married without a license or ceremony. This type of marriage is called a common law marriage. Contrary to popular belief, a common law marriage is not created when two people simply live together for a certain number of years. In order to have a valid common law marriage, the couple must do all of the following:

* live together for a significant period of time (not defined in any state)
* hold themselves out as a married couple -- typically this means using the same last name, referring to the other as "my husband" or "my wife," and filing a joint tax return, and
* intend to be married.
Which states recognize common law marriage?

Common law marriage is recognized only in the following states:

Alabama
Colorado
District of Columbia
Georgia (if created before 1/1/97)
Idaho (if created before 1/1/96)
Iowa
Kansas
Montana
New Hampshire (for inheritance purposes only)
Ohio (if created before 10/10/91)
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Texas
Utah

(click above link for more info. Updated as of 2007)

Here is another good link on this:
http://www.ncsl.org/programs/cyf/commonlaw .htm
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replied December 10th, 2007
Especially eHealthy
futureshock wrote:
I don't know where to find the info you presented, Ingi. Do you have a website I could look up?


Are you in the U.S? I should have specified that I am in the U.S., and I am referring to U.S. regulations, etc.

Common Law, I can't find any states that recognize that.
Property not in the names of both people is divided very differently between married and non-married people, check out the website below.

Alimony is still paid in certain situations when a spouse (either one) is staying at home raising the children and not currently working, etc.

For more answers,

Here is another place that shows a direct comparison:

http://family.findlaw.com/marriage/living- together/cohabitation-comparison.html


I'm in the US also.

I find where they say a spouse has the right to choose what will happen to you in case of an accident a bunch of rubbish. Ask Terry Shivo's husband. Her parents kept him in court for years when he wished to terminate her life support. In ALL cases of end of life wishes, there needs to be something written! Smile

While I do agree with the death and will issue - it seems unlikely that if you weren't married you wouldn't have a will to take care of your partner. If that happens, people are foolish.

More rubbish!
Quote:
The male in a cohabitating partnership does not incur an immediate legal obligation to support children born during the cohabitation, but may do so voluntarily (and MUST do so if paternity is established).
Paternity is established millions of times per day in the US. This should not rush people to the alter!

In fact, not a single thing on there would cause to me to consider marriage as a viable option for me.

I am married. Yes. But because my husband is my best friend and the mate to my soul. NOT because it is legally binding and we can file our taxes together. Wink

I don't believe teenage girls should get married either. They do not have the capacity to understand the life long implications of such a union.
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replied December 10th, 2007
Experienced User
I hope to get married one day. I also don't want some big fancy thing. I just want a simple wedding with my family and friends there. I'm not much of a religious person and I feel that there are too many requirements to get married in a church so I'd prefer something else. Maybe an outdoor wedding? And I've never been one for glamour and big dresses so I'll just pick something simple and cute. Hell, if I had the choice, I'd get married in pants. But, I think my mother would kill me. Lol.
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