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To me, Wal-Mart is a cave where Satan breeds.

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Paying Millions Over Americans with Disabilities Act Violations. In 2001, Wal-Mart paid $6 million dollars to settle 13 lawsuits charging the firm with widespread discrimination and violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Even after these lawsuits, Wal-Mart continued to discriminate against Americans with Disabilities; in 2004, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed suit against Wal-Mart on behalf of a Kansas City man confined to a wheelchair. [29 U.S.C. S 706 et seq; Business Journal, 1/20/04.]

Discriminating Against Employees with Cerebral Palsy. In 2002, Wal-Mart hired then 21-year old Patrick Brady, an American living with cerebral palsy, as a sales associate in the pharmacy department. After one day in the pharmacy, however, the company reassigned him to other responsibilities -- including collecting garbage and shopping carts from the parking lot. A Long Island jury found that Wal-Mart discriminated against Brady when he was transferred and asked impermissible pre-employment questions about his disability. The jury awarded Brady $7.5 million in damages, and a judge ultimately awarded Brady $2.8 million. [Associated Press, 2/24/05; Newsday, 3/24/05; New York Law Journal, 6/23/05.]

Facing NAACP Criticism for Business Practices. Wal-Mart received a C- grade on the NAACP's 2005 Economic Reciprocity Initiative (ERI) industry report cards, which grade major corporations on their business practices with respect to African Americans. NAACP Interim President & CEO Dennis Courtland Hayes said "the report cards are a good indicator for the NAACP to measure efforts or the lack thereof of major corporations in the areas of hiring, promotion, procurement, philanthropy and marketing." [NAACP Source]

For Truckers, Hiring Discrimination. Wal-Mart is facing allegations of discrimination in its hiring of truck drivers. Nationally, 15% of truck drivers are African-American, yet at Wal-Mart African-Americans comprise only 2-3% of its fleet, which employs 7,800 truck drivers. [New York Times, 7/14/05, 2005 Wal-Mart Annual Report]

For Customers, Racial Profiling. Customers have sued Wal-Mart Stores, saying they were racially profiled while shopping at its stores. The lawsuit says at least 9 customers were followed, searched, humiliated, and in some cases, detained by employees. [Boston Globe, 7/13/05]
Earning Less, Holding Fewer Senior Positions. In 2003, Dr. Richard Drogin, professor emeritus at California State University-Hayward, conducted a study on wages for female employees at Wal-Mart and found that:
female hourly workers earn up to 37 cents less per hour than their male counterparts;
female managers earn nearly $5,000 less than male managers in yearly salary;
women make up 72 percent of Wal-Mart's total workforce, but only 33 percent of its managers;
and women make up 92 percent of Wal-Mart's cashiers, but only 14 percent of Wal-Mart store managers.
[Wal-Mart Class, Plaintiff's Expert Dr. Richard Drogin's Statistical Report; New York Times, 12/30/04.]

Ignoring Warnings to Improve Conditions for Women. According to a report by Bloomberg, "Wal-Mart Stores Inc. took no action on internal warnings seven years ago that it was falling short in promoting women, documents in a federal sex-discrimination lawsuit show. The world's largest retailer didn't carry out the 1998 recommendations of a diversity task force and disbanded the panel, according to company memos, reports and depositions filed in the case. Two years later, Wal-Mart had a reduced percentage of female managers." [Bloomberg News, 7/15/05.]

Slapped with Fines Across the Country. In 2004, Wal-Mart faced fines for violations of environmental laws in nine states: California, Colorado, Delaware, Michigan, New Jersey, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas and Utah. [Associated Press, 5/12/04; New York Times, 4/13/05]

Forced to Settle Air Pollution Claims. In 2004, Wal-Mart agreed to pay $400,000 to the government to settle claims that Sam's Club had flouted federal air pollution regulations in eleven states. [The Business Journal, 1/30/04]

Widespread Water Pollution. In 2001, the EPA and Justice Department for the first time fined a company -- Wal-Mart -- for violating newly adopted standards for stormwater runoff. Wal-Mart paid $5.5 million in fines for violations at construction sites in four states: Massachusetts, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas. Four years later, however, Wal-Mart signed an agreement with the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection over storm water violations occurring over seven years at 20 stores, and agreed to pay $1,550,000 in penalties. [Underground Construction, 8/1/01; Forbes, 8/15/05]

Contaminating Water in Georgia. Georgia's Environmental Protection Division (EPD) fined Wal-Mart for letting polluted storm water run free into state waters -- resulting in $170,000 in penalties for pollution at two sites. Wal-Mart failed to take basic steps to help clean storm runoff, such as maintaining silt fencing around construction zones, installing ponds to catch storm water, and failure to keep records. The fines ranked among the highest paid in Georgia for violations of the Clean Water Act. [Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 2/10/05]

In Florida, Oil Storage Problems. Florida forced Wal-Mart to pay $765,000 in fines for operating outside safety restrictions on petroleum storage at its auto service centers. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection flagged the company for failing to register its fuel tanks with the state or install devices that prevent gasoline overflows. According to the state, Wal-Mart also failed to perform monthly safety checks, lacked current technologies to prevent overflows, blocked state inspectors from reviewing records and failed to show proper insurance documentation. [Associated Press, 11/18/04]

Building on Wetlands. Wal-Mart has a poor record of locating stores on environmentally sensitive sites, especially wetlands. In Illinois, Wal-Mart paid $80,000 in fines to the state and Lake County after a lake and nearby wetland were damaged in the community of Antioch. The state and county officials sued Wal-Mart in 2004 after storm water runoff from construction of a Supercenter polluted the area. [Institute for Local Self-Reliance, 7/21/05; Chicago Tribune, 2/25/06]

Paving Mayan Grounds. "A Wal-Mart store rising near the 2,000-year-old pyramids of the Teotihuacan Empire has ignited the wrath of Mexican conservationists and nationalists, who say the U.S. retailer is destroying their culture at the foot of one of Mexico's greatest treasures ... 63 prestigious artists and intellectuals, in a letter published in Mexican newspapers, [have] asked President Vicente Fox to stop the structure. They see it as a battle pitting Mexico's heritage against encroaching U.S. influence." [Knight Ridder, 10/25/04]

Feeding Blight. Constant expansion, conversion, replacement and relocation of stores has left vacant buildings all over the country. According to Wal-Mart Realty's website, the company has 309 listed buildings for lease, and an additional 68 buildings currently up for sale. [http://www.walmartrealty.com]

Spurring Sprawl. In the United States, Wal-Mart has 529,835,000 square feet (or approximately 12,163 acres) of retail space -- not counting the parking lots. [SEC form 10-K, filed March 31, 2005]

Using Polluting Suppliers. According to the Capital Times, "Murphy Oil USA Corp." -- which operates Wal-Mart branded gas stations -- "violated Federal Environmental Laws and withheld information from the government on changes to its Superior refinery ... [by] emitting more than 20 times the allowable level of sulfur dioxide for the last decade than what would have been allowed had the required pollution control equipment been installed." [Capital Times, 8/2/01]

More Than $1 Billion In Public Subsidies. (This is welfare, folks.) A May 2004 report documented how Wal-Mart received more than $1 billion from at least 244 taxpayer-funded subsidies -- including free or reduced price land, Tax Increment Finance (TIF) districts, infrastructure assistance, property tax breaks, state corporate income tax credits, sales tax rebates, tax-exempt bond financing, enterprise zone status, job training/recruiting funds and general grants. [Mattera and Purinton, Good Jobs First, "Shopping for Subsidies," May 2004]

Millions To Widen the Street to Its Headquarters. A federal highway bill signed by President Bush in 2005 included $35 million to widen Eighth Street in Bentonville -- the road to Wal-Mart's corporate headquarters. The company says it asked U.S. Rep. John Boozman (R-AR) to secure funding -- even though local highway officials said the driveway was not a high priority. [Associated Press, 3/25/05; Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, 8/11/05; Benton Daily Record, 8/21/05]
$9.5 Million for a San Diego Development. A San Diego development project anchored by a Wal-Mart and a Sam's Club received about $9.5 million in public subsidies -- yet the stores contribute only about $800,000 in annual sales tax to the city. [Brennan Center for Justice]
Costs Outweigh Benefits. A Penn State report on the economic impact of local subsidies found that "[t]he public costs that [Wal-Mart] imposes by raising the poverty rate suggest that public infrastructure subsidies may not be warranted." [Stephan J. Goetz, Hema Swaminathan, "Wal-Mart and County-Wide Poverty," Social Science Quarterly, 6/06]



Know where you shop, do not support Wal-Mart.
Support small businesses managed by local owners.

High Cost of Low Prices video: http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-3 836296181471292925&q=walmart&total =25184&start=0&num=10&so=0& ;type=search&plindex=0
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replied December 5th, 2007
Supporter
I worked for Walmart for four years when I was in highschool. Even in a small town, the ethical stance of Walmart is ludicrious.

I try to not shop there as often as possible. This goes for any Sam's Club either. Bleh.
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replied December 5th, 2007
Experienced User
guys cmon wal mart is a example of our current state of economy min us becuz its capitialsim at its worst when u think about it because all stores stayt out equal unless in another circum stance like their mommy owns a store and and gave them a lot of money to invest in stocks and got a lot of moeny so they started a monoply but sides fro mthat all stores start the ssame its just wal marts succeeds so if u dont like walmart u should mt becuz its popularity came froom you and they think walmarts bad pff
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replied December 5th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
What?

WalMart is the embodiment of the doom of local business. Cheap stuff to buy just means that people will buy buy buy stuff they don't need. this contributes to so many social environmental problems right now. Lead paint in toys poisoning childre, toxic chemicals being dumped down the river to produce all of the cheap goods we buy, landfills overflowing because we live in a disposable society, foreign children being sold into slave labor to build the toys that american kids play with, I could go on and on. there are many huge social implications from a mammoth organization such as this. If you really sit down and let your mind spin out all the trickle down effects, it is really astonishing. I urge you to view the video posted above.
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replied December 5th, 2007
Active User, very eHealthy
I think it's funny how people who won't shop at Wal-Mart still shop at places like Best Buy, which isn't much better.

There are better ways to make a difference.
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replied December 5th, 2007
Especially eHealthy
I prefer (should say: love!) Target!! I've seen that video; it was very good.
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replied December 6th, 2007
Supporter
I like to buy local stuff. It's a bit more expensive, but I don't buy things I don't need, so it levels out.
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replied December 6th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
marvel wrote:
I like to buy local stuff. It's a bit more expensive, but I don't buy things I don't need, so it levels out.


BINGO!

*Marvel hits the nail on the head*

I shopl ocally whenever its humanly possible. IT does cost a little bit more, but when you come to the realization that you don't really need all that stuff, it sets you free.
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replied December 6th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
i only shop at walmart cause i can afford it---i hate walmart with a passion--it is truly the home of all cheap plastic crap
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replied December 6th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
Tmddyan wrote:
i only shop at walmart cause i can afford it---i hate walmart with a passion--it is truly the home of all cheap plastic crap


I can't afford crap, even if it's only a buck. Wink
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replied December 6th, 2007
Especially eHealthy
I don't think it's just Wal-Mart. I think it's all the big stores in general. I've worked in retail and I've seen how bad it is, and it's not just Wal-Mart.

However, Wal-Mart does kind've symbolize all that.
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replied December 6th, 2007
Experienced User
ye lot of other buisness...mcdonalds...bugrer... king ...kfc... pizzahut... domino... coles... soccerstop... walmart... kmart... shaws... stopshop... bestwest... peliccio... olvie garden... target... best buy... toysrus... kidsrus... babyrus... officemax... circutcity... strawberrys... movie theater... lineensnthings... staples... homedepot... lowes... iparty... dunkin donuts... honeydew... deanglo... papa gino...super cut... red cross ...blue cross...starmart...liquor store...more a lot here
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replied December 6th, 2007
Especially eHealthy
Liquor Store? That's not a "chain". That's a description.

iParty? Strawberry's? Honeydew? Deanglo? Peliccio? Shaws? I've never heard of any of these. Perhaps they are Swedish?

Red-cross and Blue-cross are not COMPANIES like McDonald's or Wal-Mart. That's rather offensive to say they are... they are like charities for helping people, they run the blood drives.
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replied December 6th, 2007
Experienced User
not swedish ive never been to sweden but one time
all those are franchise
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replied December 6th, 2007
Especially eHealthy
Then why did you say that swedish was your excuse for not knowing how to write english?

Red-cross and Blue-cross should NOT be on that list.
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replied December 6th, 2007
Experienced User
i was born talking swedish and i have trouble with english
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replied December 6th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
Perhaps the brute impact of Wal Mart above all other retailers is not understood. Confused
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replied December 7th, 2007
Especially eHealthy
just a question... but why are we talking about how well somebody speaks english in a topic about walmart?

maybe walmart isevil... it seems to draw bad vibes and arguments lol.
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replied December 7th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
what's the problem with Walmart? I like to buy in walmart, particulary I like to do groceries there because they have fair prices. I also develop my film there because it's the best quality of pictures at the best price. I don't think it's that cheap. When I do groceries for food that I need I'm still spending a hundred bucks which would be 150 if I go to Harris Teeter. So just because it's a fair price doesn't mean I spend more. I still can't spend even like crazy even if it is wal-mart. There is many things I wouldn't buy there like kitchen gadgets just because I like expensive kitchen gadgets. But food yes I can shop that in walmart and also my dvd's. If they have what I look for and it is there for a cheaper price I will continue to go there so I can save money.
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replied December 7th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
They don't have "fair" prices. As detailed in the film listed above, we all pay for their "low prices". Their employees are dangling at the poverty level and WM has the audacity to suggest to its employees that they go on state assistance. The move in to communites, give menial jobs to people, force out other small businesses, and use child labor to produce the goods they purchase. WM is selling the American People out to China and giving your kids a healthy dose of lead paint in the deal.

I live about 5 minutes from a WM Supercenter. There is a little town not too far from here that voted down putting a WM in their town because they like their small town and they are only 10 minutes from a WM. Somehow, though, the people of this town were sold out to WM and there will be one built in their adorable little town. Even though 10 miles away is a WM full of all the plastic crap and overindulgence every american is guaranteed a right to.
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