November 13th, 2007
Especially eHealthy
wait! a GUARD DOG? are you guys serious?
no! im sorry but do you KNOW HOW most of these dogs LIVE!????

thats really sad. thats a horrible thing to suggest.

Property owners often buy into the idea that the mere presence of a large dog will keep trespassers at bay so they in turn pay guard dog rental companies for this service. Business owners hire "fence dogs" who are often kept in outdoor pens, locked inside a building, or tied up during the day. These dogs are then released at night to roam the fenced-in properties surrounding warehouses, used car lots, construction sites, etc. until the next morning when they are restrained or confined once again. Like all social animals, these dogs crave attention and companionship, but they are often kept alone and isolated.

Guard dogs are kept outdoors through all types of weather including snow, sleet, rain, extreme heat and freezing cold. Often ignored and forgotten, these dogs suffer in the shadows of our urban neighborhoods, rarely receiving any compassionate attention.

Sadly, any large, homeless dog is a potential victim of this business. Tragically, some guard dog companies have been able to get animals from shelters and rescue groups who face the daunting task of finding homes for a constant flow of relinquished or stray dogs. These former pets leave the shelter doors, not knowing that their new home will be a concrete lot behind a chainlink fence. Just imagine being condemned to live such a life after knowing a home and a family of your own!
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replied November 13th, 2007
Especially eHealthy
better than being put down, imo.
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replied November 13th, 2007
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Sad

thats just sad
to let a dog live like that
and gues what? when the owners of the lots are done with them they turn the dogs loose
or just let them go
or leave them to die
and in the end those dogs turn out trying to fight for thier life
and could REALLY end up hurting someone.
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replied November 13th, 2007
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No dog can defend herself against a violent trespasser wielding a weapon. She cannot even escape her chain-link prison to flee the danger and so she may be injured or killed if she gets in the way. In August 1998, a guard dog in Paterson New Jersey was beaten with a pipe while living in an auto lot in an industrial section of town. Aside from trespassers, guard dogs have to deal with the antagonism of people passing by on the street. Children and adults have been spotted hurling garbage, metal objects and even glass bottles at guard dogs in Newark and Jersey City. These poor dogs cannot defend themselves against such cruel assaults. It is a pitiful sight.

Guard dogs simply can't win. In May 2001, following his school prom, a teenager jumped a fence at the Funtown Pier in New Jersey. Two Rottweilers kept as guard dogs on the property attacked the boy. The police subsequently shot and killed the dogs. Guard dogs are continuously taught to distrust new people and they should not be expected to decipher between real threats and harmless children. They are conditioned to react, yet when they do, the public is at risk and the dogs are labeled dangerous. If we as a society don't want dangerous dogs in our midst, how can we allow the guard dog business to continue?
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replied November 13th, 2007
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its not always like that.

i have several friends of my family that own things like car lots, businesses in general that have guard dogs. they are treated just like any other member of the family during the day, kept inside the business, treated well NOT AROUND KIDS and let outside at night, with a dog house and ample food and water.
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replied November 13th, 2007
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Sandy_Pants wrote:
its not always like that.

i have several friends of my family that own things like car lots, businesses in general that have guard dogs. they are treated just like any other member of the family during the day, kept inside the business, treated well NOT AROUND KIDS and let outside at night, with a dog house and ample food and water.


yeah not all places are like that
but youd be suprised how many ARE

infact cetain states such as new jersey are working to ban the "guard dog" buissness because its gotten so bad and so out of hand
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replied November 13th, 2007
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well, its better than being dead.

She could also look into giving him to a family that has a huge piece of property like a farm. He'd do well there.
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replied November 13th, 2007
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Sandy_Pants wrote:
well, its better than being dead.

She could also look into giving him to a family that has a huge piece of property like a farm. He'd do well there.


a farm would be good too
or even a single family with no kids
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replied November 13th, 2007
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I don't think it's fair to be leaving Duke outside like this Michelle. He would be better off somewhere else and I would say that whether he had bit Kayleigh or not.

You NEED to find him a home. You also NEED to tell them that he bit her. You CANNOT risk it happening again to another child.
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replied November 13th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
the_girlfriend wrote:
No dog can defend herself against a violent trespasser wielding a weapon. She cannot even escape her chain-link prison to flee the danger and so she may be injured or killed if she gets in the way. In August 1998, a guard dog in Paterson New Jersey was beaten with a pipe while living in an auto lot in an industrial section of town. Aside from trespassers, guard dogs have to deal with the antagonism of people passing by on the street. Children and adults have been spotted hurling garbage, metal objects and even glass bottles at guard dogs in Newark and Jersey City. These poor dogs cannot defend themselves against such cruel assaults. It is a pitiful sight.

Guard dogs simply can't win. In May 2001, following his school prom, a teenager jumped a fence at the Funtown Pier in New Jersey. Two Rottweilers kept as guard dogs on the property attacked the boy. The police subsequently shot and killed the dogs. Guard dogs are continuously taught to distrust new people and they should not be expected to decipher between real threats and harmless children. They are conditioned to react, yet when they do, the public is at risk and the dogs are labeled dangerous. If we as a society don't want dangerous dogs in our midst, how can we allow the guard dog business to continue?


Don't take this the wrong way but did you actually write this or did you copy and paste it from somewhere? The above is not your writing style nor does it have your typical spelling errors. You know I like you Suzy, I was just curious.
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replied November 13th, 2007
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ladylee70 wrote:
the_girlfriend wrote:
No dog can defend herself against a violent trespasser wielding a weapon. She cannot even escape her chain-link prison to flee the danger and so she may be injured or killed if she gets in the way. In August 1998, a guard dog in Paterson New Jersey was beaten with a pipe while living in an auto lot in an industrial section of town. Aside from trespassers, guard dogs have to deal with the antagonism of people passing by on the street. Children and adults have been spotted hurling garbage, metal objects and even glass bottles at guard dogs in Newark and Jersey City. These poor dogs cannot defend themselves against such cruel assaults. It is a pitiful sight.

Guard dogs simply can't win. In May 2001, following his school prom, a teenager jumped a fence at the Funtown Pier in New Jersey. Two Rottweilers kept as guard dogs on the property attacked the boy. The police subsequently shot and killed the dogs. Guard dogs are continuously taught to distrust new people and they should not be expected to decipher between real threats and harmless children. They are conditioned to react, yet when they do, the public is at risk and the dogs are labeled dangerous. If we as a society don't want dangerous dogs in our midst, how can we allow the guard dog business to continue?


Don't take this the wrong way but did you actually write this or did you copy and paste it from somewhere? The above is not your writing style nor does it have your typical spelling errors. You know I like you Suzy, I was just curious.


it came from a website that has an article on guard dogs.
one of the best guard dog defence articles on the net
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replied November 13th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
It was a good article. Thanks That article is so sad. We are SPCA supporters.

At first I was reading it, thinking - darn she can write good for a 16 year old. Then it occurred to me that you got it off somewhere.
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replied November 13th, 2007
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ladylee70 wrote:
It was a good article. Thanks That article is so sad. We are SPCA supporters.

At first I was reading it, thinking - darn she can write good for a 16 year old. Then it occurred to me that you got it off somewhere.


actually i CAN write good for a 16 yr old
ive won the young authors contest twice in 1st place
the Texas VFW awards 1st place in 2204 and 2nd place in 2005
Very Happy

i havent actually sat down and written anything in a long time Sad
but in 8th grade i published a book through nationwide publishing in kansas city called IRENE
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replied November 13th, 2007
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Sandy, I'm definately going to tell them that he bit Kaylee. That was one of the first things I told the lady today that I talked to at the humane society. I'm not sure about him being a guard dog though, I mentioned it to Shane & he said he'd rather have him put to sleep than do that to him. I honestly don't know anywhere around here where they have guard dogs besides one junk yard across town.
Sarah I remember your post you made about your dog being put down Sad That's the last thing I want for Duke, you know how that is, but just like you said, I'm not putting my daughters life in harm over a dog or any animal. Maybe he didn't mean to bite her, maybe he was just trying to play. But I don't care. A bite is a bite.
Mandi, thank you! I'm still shaken up by it, he could have done SO much damage to her Sad
Suzy, the only reason I won't place an ad is because I don't want to wait & wait to try finding him a home just to never get a phone call or email. My sisters bf told me tonight that his uncle might take him but that'd require waiting until next week for him to ask him. I'm waiting for a phone call back right now, the lady that did my senior pictures has 3-4 pitbulls & rottweilers, she can't have kids so no worrying about that, I'm hoping she'll take him. I doubt it though.
Becky, I know it's not fair that Duke's always outside. I have been telling Shane that for the last couple weeks, that I just don't have time for him & it's not fair to Duke. He deserves to be in a home where his owner has the time & energy to put into him. & he doesn't get that here. We're most definately getting rid of him. If there was room in the pounds he would have been gone today. If I don't get this phone call back from the lady I was talking about, I'm calling the dog warden tomorrow.

I have so many mixed emotions about all of this. I'm furious that Duke would bite her, I don't even want to look at him. I'm also sad though because Kaylee loves him, the first thing she does every morning is goes over to lay her head on Duke. What do I say to a 13 month old when she wakes up in the morning & her dog isn't there & is never coming back?
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replied November 13th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
I am so sorry you have to go through all of this!! Big hugs to you and your family.



Suzy, very impressive. You do seem to express yourself quite well. When you quote an article, please state where it came from. It is plagerizing if you don't. My husband works at a newspaper and it is not taken lightly. Besides it would be nice to refer to the informative website.
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replied November 13th, 2007
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we found our dog the perfect home in WI when we left. MY inlaws didnt want me to bring him + that would have been so hard. he now lives on a HUGE farm and the surrounding property is the granparents and uncle. he has his own fenced in area with an igloo and a roof for shade and a heated barn for the winter. I wish every dog could find people as lovely as that.
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replied November 13th, 2007
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michelle its hard and im sorry Sad

duke will find a good home. i wish i could help you out hun Sad ive located all the shelters and rescues in your area and they are all full except the humane society Sad
i know you said your sisters bf uncle might be able to take him but not for a while? does your sister have room for duke? does she have kids? if not then maybe she could take him until her bfs uncle can permanently?
or if you have any friends or family that could take him and they can rehome him?
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replied November 13th, 2007
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Thanks.. No, no one will take him until we can find something else. My sister & her bf live at home with my mom so there's no room there & they already have a couple cats & 2 dogs. One of my friends & her boyfriend was telling us the last time they were here that they'd love to have Duke & he's such a beautiful dog & blah blah blah. But when it came down to it & I asked them if they want him, they said no. Figures.

Still no phone call from the lady with the pitbulls & rottweilers. I'm not really expecting her to call.

The dog warden is going to be our only option & I'm going to cry like a baby when they come to take him or when we drop him off to them. Not crying for me, but for Kaylee losing her dog. It's for the better though, I know that, this is just plain hard.
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replied November 13th, 2007
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its okay hun
we are all here for you to help you
kaylee might not understand now but one day when shes old enough she will

my advice is try not to let her see them take her
the warden will come to your house. they will put duke on a chain and put him into a cage in thier truck. kaylee doesnt need to see that.

and i would actually not recommend you dropping him off either. if they can come get him then have them do that.
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replied November 13th, 2007
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ladylee70 wrote:
I am so sorry you have to go through all of this!! Big hugs to you and your family.



Suzy, very impressive. You do seem to express yourself quite well. When you quote an article, please state where it came from. It is plagerizing if you don't. My husband works at a newspaper and it is not taken lightly. Besides it would be nice to refer to the informative website.


sorry hun Sad i should have posted the link but i had the article saved in microsft word
i didnt have the link saved and i should have
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Tags: Pregnancy, skin, ear
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