Medical Questions > Conditions and Diseases > Insect Bites Forum

Crawling Sensations Under the Skin, Bites, Parasites (Page 1)

I've suffered from crawling sensations under my skin, mainly on my shoulder, but also face, hair, legs, feet, just about everywhere, since 2004.
I don't have the fibres some people talk about but maybe that's a secondary complication.
I've discovered from researching that they are Collembola (Springtails) and now I can actually see them under the webbing of top layer of skin by using the new kids toy EYE-CLOPS which you view, at 200 x magnification, on your TV screen.
They are white and reflect the light from the magnifier (especially their eyes). Still waited till they moved to make sure I wasn't imagining it.
Bad news is that I've been trying for 12 months to kill them, to no avail. I can't think of any more things to try but if I find something I'll let you know. When I have really made them suffer, they bite, but seem to recover quickly.
Worst time I gave them was when I had the church Elders pray for me. The Springtails bit me for days, keeping me awake at night, but they're still here. Maybe God has a purpose for my suffering. I'll keep you posted. Don't give up! Lyn
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First Helper Kooterdan
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replied October 6th, 2007
Active User, very eHealthy
Isn't there a skin bath you can take? Have you tried soaking the skin in a disinfectant?
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replied October 7th, 2007
Believe me, I have tried everything. Even burnt my skin raw with chemicals. To date, no-one has come up with a real solution, even though the bug-rid chemical companies will sell you "treatments".

Thanks for your suggestion though.
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replied June 6th, 2008
i found this on wikipedia
Various sources and publications have suggested that some springtails may parasitize humans, but this is entirely inconsistent with their biology, and no such phenomenon has ever been scientifically confirmed, though it has been documented that the scales or hairs from collembolans can cause irritation when rubbed into the flesh [7]. They can sometimes be abundant indoors in damp places such as bathrooms and basements[2], and under such circumstances may be found on one's person, but this is only accidental.

Have you been to a doctor?
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replied May 14th, 2009
Environmental control of Springtails
Pyrethrins, Pyrethrins, pyrethrins (some claim deet). These are available at your local nursery or even at Wal-Mart (vegetable pest spray). (NO PERMETHRINS! These insects are immune to all over the counter insect bombs, sprays and repellents. Wouldn�t you expect that from and insect that kills with benzene venom while producing Tylenol (acetaminophenol) to deaden its attack!
Thirdly:
These hardy little insects survive laundering at any temperature, including bleach and the hottest dryer settings.
In order to kill them in bedding, clothes, on smaller surfaces (keyboards and mice) Books etc. one must VACUUM SEAL these objects for at least 3 days or more. They cannot live without moisture and especially OXYGEN.
With the combination of pyrethrin lotion, pyrethrin spray, and Vacuum Sealing (everything regularly) one will get major relief
from these insidious pests!

Things to AVOID:
1. HUGGING. You must be prepared ahead of time. Carry a few fresh garments and plastic bags for this one. Within a few minutes after hugging, bow out quickly and immediately change shirt or blouse putting a fresh vacuum sealed one on and place the contaminated garment in a plastic bag not to be opened or touched until the laundry day ritual.

2. After hugging and on laundry day, watch for pimples in armpits and on hands and arms, spot treat any breakouts with pyrethrin lotion.

2. Telephone handsets that have not been thoroughly wiped down antiseptically. If within a few hours of use, pimples form around the neck, ears, lower arms etc. immediately spot treat with pyrethrin lotion!

3.Older Carpeting (upon arriving home, immediately remove socks and shoes) vacuum seal shoes and get socks clean and in Vacuum seal after laundering. Immediately treat feet and lower legs with pyrethrin lotion! My legs come under heavy attack at our local Barnes and Noble!

4.Car seats, sofas and chairs, which have been untreated with pyrethrins,

5. Sitting down anywhere in public or touching anything a non-hygienic carrier has handled (leaning against counters, pens, books, toys, tools etc.),

6.Old used books, computer keyboards and mice (unless previously vacuum sealed.)

Precautionary things:

1.Carry some garbage bags with you at all times_to place anywhere you are required to sit. Dispose of them immediately without over handling them!

2.Do not use regular cloth laundry bags. Upon arriving at home immediately remove clothes daily and keep them in tightly sealed plastic bags until laundry day upon which immediately after laundering and THOROUGH DRYING, ALL CLOTHES MUST BE PLACED IN A VACUUM SEAL FOR 3 OR MORE DAYS! Never wear clothes out in public for more than 1 day!

3. Have 3 or more pair of shoes and cycle them all through vacuum seal every day if heavy exposure is taking place!

4 Do not leave shoes and socks on after entering house for any length of time after being out in public. This only brings the bugs in! Place shoes only in one area to be pyrethrined or dusted with Diatomaceous earth regularly.

5. Bomb the car (or house if required) as necessary only with Johnson and Johnson Pyrethrin bug bombs. Make sure regularly handled tools, toys, golf clubs etc are either bombed with the above or vacuum-sealed every few weeks, especially if contaminated strangers handle them. Be aware if breakouts happen after handling any of the above. Spot treat accordingly.

6. Remove all carpeting in car or house unless you want to spend a fortune on Pyrethrins and their bombs.

7. Change and vacuum seal shower curtains weekly!
9. This should have been at the first position. Plastic off and Tape up seams of all bed mattresses, car seats and furniture, Wipe down and/or change plastic regularly. Pyrethrin all bed rails, car seats (regularly) and under furniture as necessary! Use 30 and 55 gallon garbage bags over all chairs, stools, and bucket seats.

Also do not waste your time boiling, freezing or storing away. Springtails will survive all of these techniques (after all there are around a million per acre throughout the world including the frost lines of Antarctica)!

It took me 8 years of suffering to discover all these techniques to control the most primitive �insects?� in the fossil record!

Better Health to All. I sure appreciate an actual reply to my mail. You must be sincerely interested and on the ball.
I have been experimenting on (for the last 11 years) and researching this insect on the web for the last 6 months. They've terrorized me and hundreds (thousands) of my neighbors, who choose to live with these creatures! I stumbled ,one day, upon a great scientific web site that listed/analyzed insects (animals) and their derivative compounds. After reading the chemical analysis of the colembolla's poisons/ camouflage, I finally discovered why my skin became pre-cancerous after a major attack.I think I saved the pages and a link to the site but it was on my old laptop. I backed up the files that day, but they are stored away on another usb hard drive. I will look them up and email you again next week if you can't locate that scientific site. I guess I don't need to tell you why the big drug companies keep most Dr.'s and the public in the dark about these dastardly creatures. They are their CASH COW! Colembolla (the most primitive creature found in fossil records) have been traveling on Icy comets and jump starting evolution (in the entire universe) since the beginning of time! I also found that they can (are forced) to evolve (in the presence of air) from a water animal into a land animal in seconds. When they come to the surface of the water and air is present, they cannot go back under because air bubbles form on their leg hairs. Also note Dr.s in our area are prescribing Acutane when they see the effects of a colembolla attack on my neighbors. I've contacted Hoffman La Roche' urgently, twice, to warn them of this, but alas, they're in on it too. What is our health care in America? In the hole for decades! The most important theory of mine (which should be added to your questionaire) is that, "The Colembolla's preferred food is bacteria (not yeast), this is why antibiotics work, albeit temporarily, and since most Americans eat so much medicated meat, these insects don't have many dining choices. I am a strict vegetarian(?) and they love me."
I hope to hear from you again and if (in your research) you can find when Tylenol was patented you will also know when this enormous conspiracy began!
Imagine that fire ants were swarming on everything, everyone and on every surface outside (and inside) your home. Would you not take precautions to protect yourself? Just because Colembola is invisible to the naked eye, you can't treat them any differently! They are more dangerous in the long run.
Obsessive compulsive has nothing to do with preventing insect-skin contact. Just one of their little benzene laden bites could/will develop into skin cancer within a few months/years and KILL you! If you're waiting for some magic pill or Dr. to solve this problem simply (like others I've been in contact with on the net), you've got an awful long wait!
5 years ago before I learned these control methods, I too considered suicide! As I sit here typing this, they are dying in my ears and on my face (strong homemade pyrethrins). I got exposed to some on a set of head phones my friend handed me at band practice. Get some cocoa butter (thick) lotion, pour out about 1/6th of the bottle filling it with pyrethrin (obtained at the local ,big, full service Nursery, or even Wal-Mart. Follow all instructions below to the letter. Carry a few bottles with you. I share them with my friends who are AWARE of being attacked.
I coated my legs and feet last night because I hand't been on skin patrol for a few days and at this point I only have about 10-20 on me that still live. If I see them starting to get out of control or even feel them crawling around on me at night , I slap a gob of pyrethrin lotion. and that either kills them or slows them down severely!
Write back please! Now the tough part. You have some work to do. Notify me if you don't have enough funds. Don't let them terrorize you like they are! I'll help you all I can because I know what you're going through, believe me!
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Users who thank Kooterdan for this post: momzacarp  Msbuggy 

replied October 27th, 2011
How about a pic of a springtail?
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replied December 28th, 2011
i have tons but I don't know how to send them. so..go to your search and type ask an Entomologist. hit enter. When the screen appears just type in pictures of springtails. ggod luck Janiney
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replied May 20th, 2009
springtails
what is a springtail insect? what does it look like
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replied August 2nd, 2009
What Kooterdan said is right on the ball park. I think you may have bird mite. I am suffering from this problem too. I believe its a new epedimic that is not being spoke of yet, because all of a sudden a lot of people are getting it. Its similar to scabies, but worse because doctors dont know of it yet. Rx Permithim cream should be applied once then 7 days afterward. But first before you treat yourself, you must treat your environment or move. Treat all of your environments by using a defogger on the website called ceadercide.com (online store). You can place an order over the phone as well. Wash everything and dry it in hot water everyday with borox detergenct and tide. Bag everything up after you wash it wearing gloves so you wont contaminate your clean clothes. Mop the floor with ammonia and anyother cleaning agent listed on birdmite.org website. These mite sukers can live with out a host for a months, so make sure you clean things properly. Its very costly to get rid of and annoying. Most bombs, the mite has a resistence to it, and it wont kill it. You can burn your skin to black and it wont help. Time, patience and keeping a health immune system is key. Let me know if this helped. Others, feel free to respond to this post for any suggestions I may have left out.
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Users who thank joyola for this post: momzacarp 

replied December 28th, 2010
Springtail or bird mite infestation?
When my kids and I came down with something that the docs said was "scabies", (years ago) I followed the instructions to the letter, and it kept coming back. We sealed our clothing in plastic for weeks, and when we took them out and wore them, the itching was still there.

I've given this SO much thought, and reading posts from others suffering with this have helped a lot. The crawling, biting sensations are exactly the same...and when you describe them to a doctor, they think you have mental issues.
A while back our town paper ran a story about bird mites coming into people's houses. We've had an unusual amount of rain this year, and have all been itching like crazy. I think it's either the bird mites or Collembola.

Someone in another post mentioned that they can survive a long time in fabrics, which makes sense because the Springtails exist on organic material they find in the dirt.

After experimenting, the washing procedure that I've found works when we're having a home invasion is to wash ALL clothes in the hottest water possible, and stop the machine during the wash cycle to let them soak in the hot water for 5 or 6 hours, turn to the spin cycle, then fill it up again with hot water for the rinse and let them soak for another long time before putting them in a hot dryer.

Putting the clean clothes into drawers with other clothes that have been stored for a long time just infests the newly cleaned clothes, so to be really thorough, you must take all the clothes out of the drawers to wash at the same time and spray the inside of the drawers with Pyrethrin spray.

VACUUM EVERYTHING! Vacuum carpets and bare floors at least every other day. Change sheets EVERY week and vacuum mattress and pillows. Vacuum couches and chairs.

I'm working on different formulations for a home remedy. Last night I mixed about a teaspoon of Neem oil and a 1/2 tsp of Tea tree oil with a couple of oz. of liquid Johnson's baby soap. Got into a very hot bath to open pores, washed my hair and body with the stuff and let it soak in for 10 min or so. Felt some very slight movements last night in bed (big improvement!) and they seem to have recovered a little today, but are still weaker than before. I will try leaving it on longer next time, and maybe even overnight.
When my daughter had head lice several years ago, the Pyrethrin shampoo just wasn't working, even though we were very diligent.
I read that adding some type of enzyme would disrupt their lifecycle and kill them. I made a mixture of hair conditioner, vinegar (to dissolve the glue holding the nits to the hair) and meat tenderizer, let it soak into her hair for 30 minutes under a shower cap. That finally did the trick.

The Springtails must have some weakness that can be used against them, that doesn't do damage to the people/animals being treated. (our dog is itching, too) I'm fantasizing about some kind of mechanical means to remove them (nano robots)would be nice.
I hate feeling that I or my family might inadvertently pass this on to friends and their families...so that they would have to also struggle with it.

But it seems that it may be developing into a larger problem for many people...which may finally get the attention of the medical community. Oh...but then they'll call it "Mass Hysteria" until doctors in their expensive houses start having to reckon with it in their own lives.
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replied December 31st, 2010
@ momzacarp - thanks for sharing
@ momzacarp - have you or your family ever tried stromectol? It's a drug used to kill the eggs that these things burrow into your skin. Also, I have had some success with heating the hell out of them - my furniture and car.
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replied December 31st, 2010
No, but I will look it up now. There are very few organisms on Earth that can live through temperatures that are high enough to cook them.(a few bacteria)
How did you apply heat to things without melting them?
Thanks!
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replied January 1st, 2011
Heat and Stromectol -helping with bird mites
I actually bought a large 30,000 - 50,000 butane heater, the kind that is used to heat outdoor areas in the winter. I fire it up and use it in areas that I am getting the crawling sensations. There are lots of sparks when I do this, so I think they are being killed. When I use it near furniture, I hit the furniture, like you do when you have a rug that you are trying to get dirt and dust out of. The sparks fly! BE CAREFUL, though. I scorched the back of a couch when I did this recently. Be very careful not to burn yourself or anything else! It only takes a few minutes and I do this several times a week for the past few weeks when I clean. It seems to be helping a lot. I paid about $185 for it and the propane tank rental that it is hooked up to.

I was getting desperate! I'm pretty convinced I have bird mites. I was miserable about 2 months ago, but w/stromectol and the heating method i'm using, I can actually sit on my furniture and not feel like I'm being attacked.

Does anyone in your family have acne? I did for a long time and once I took Stromectol it cleared up within 2 weeks.
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replied May 6th, 2012
I started getting big pimples around my hairline and on chin and I tried everything. I used Clearasil rapid action daily face wash...walah no more pimples. I don't know maybe its the salicylic acid in it. I should try it all over my body..but it goes to fast that way.
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replied May 6th, 2012
I started getting big pimples around my hairline and on chin and I tried everything. I used Clearasil rapid action daily face wash...walah no more pimples. I don't know maybe its the salicylic acid in it. I should try it all over my body..but it goes to fast that way.
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replied January 1st, 2011
Bird mite infestation
misdiagnosed1
Yes...my daughter has acne. When we went to the doctor to see about the itching and rashes, he said he's never seen anything like the rash on her back. Not like acne, and not a "contact" rash as from using a new detergent or fabric softener, etc.
We all were treated with Permethrin cream on Tues, and I'm already starting to feel the crawling again 4 days later. Thinking I didn't wash everything well enough.
Very discouraging.
Started covering the couch with a large blanket that can be thrown in the washer. Vacuuming everything almost every day
Read that Lemon Grass and Tea Tree oil will kill them.
Wow...Just looked at Birdmite.com, and there is a SUBSTANTIAL amount of helpful info to be found there!
It also describes the extent of the problem that we're dealing with, but that with much work and diligence, it can be controlled.
I think we've had problems with birdmites occasionally through the years, but spraying and vacuuming alone seemed to keep them under control. For some reason, recent conditions (a lot of rain) seem to favor their growth, and they're going nuts. We can't afford to have our entire house fumigated, so I'm going to look at Cedarcide's fumigation system.
Good luck and we should stay in touch for moral support!
Thanks...
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replied May 6th, 2012
It sounds more like Collumbola (springtails)to me.
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replied January 1st, 2011
Stromectol and Heat - Bird Mites
I have referenced birdmite.org as well - lots of good stuff on there.

I had the exact same results with chemicals - limited duration of effectiveness. I think the hardest part is to get them out of the environment so they don't continue to make us hosts. My goal is to kill the adults as often as possible, with the thought that eventually, all eggs in the furniture will hatch and there won't be any more! I am also thinking of getting rid of a loveseat that has seen better days in about a month if it is still a source of the problem. When I sit on it I still feel a few crawlies on me...much better than it was about a month ago, but still...

I am fortunate in that I live alone, but have pets - 1 dog and 2 cats. So far, they don't seem to be itching.

Let's definitely stay in touch. I need moral support! And I'm curious about Cedarcide's fumigation system. Please post how that works if you use it.
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Users who thank misdiagnosed1 for this post: momzacarp 

replied May 6th, 2012
The cidarcide fumigation seems pretty expensive..I wish I could afford. I am going to replace my furniture with leather or vinyl...I think that will work better. They seem to like cotton.
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replied January 1st, 2011
Dear misdiagnosed1;
The Cedarcide is not cheap; @$50 a gallon, plus another $200 for a fogger; although I suppose you could just use a spray bottle to distribute it on everything.
This problem is HUGE! Just went to another website, where they sell an enzyme product called "Klean Green" Some of the testimonials are wrenching; people who have suffered for many years with doctors telling them they were crazy, being isolated from their families etc. If they are genuine stories from real people; this stuff sounds like it works.
It is enzyme based, which theoretically dissolves their carapaces. Meat tenderizer is just a type of enzyme...wonder if making a paste of that and applying it would work?
Hang in there!
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replied January 1st, 2011
PS, Re: Your pets:
We adopted a puppy in October who had scabs in her fur. After that, our other dog started getting them, and then our cats developed scabs. I think we may also have gotten them from her before she was treated, because my daughter is always wrestling and playing on the floor with her.
The vet injected her with Invectin which was expensive but seemed to help, and recommended that we treat all of the dogs and cats at the same time with "Revolution" which cures a number of conditions, including mites. I'm thinking about asking the doctor for an oral dose of Invectin for us humans, but I doubt he will give us a prescription unless he can see
them for himself. We don't have health insurance, so each time one of us goes for a visit it's $80.
If this turns into an epidemic, maybe the Dept of Health will step up to the plate. Nah....
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replied January 2nd, 2011
Kleen Green Ivermectin Bird Mites
I tried the Kleen Green stuff around my house, but I only used it on hard surfaces. I will have to say it wasn't a great deal of help, but at the time, I was in a bad place - had not had Ivermectin yet and was really at a loss for fighting these things.

The way I convinced my dermatologist to prescribe Ivermectin was by taking several articles in from the web from reliable sources about using it as a treatment for lice and other parasites. She was also able to observe how bad my acne was. At one point, I couldn't even leave the house! She prescribed it but then referred me to a specialist for "difficult dermatology"! He has also given me 4 doses of it. I have taken 4 doses altogether since October - I also ordered it online. My insurance paid a for a big part of it - so each dose was only $11. However, many pharmacies do not carry it. I had to call several in the area before I found 2 that did. One was a hospital pharmacy.

I too, have done so much research on this. From what I've read, the mites only affect the skin of certain people in the household. It sounds like your daughter is the lucky one. Ivermectin seems to be pretty safe, so if you try it, what have you got to lose? I read on one web site that people in South America take it like aspirin; there is a much higher prevalence of parasites there.

All of my pets are on Revolution or Sentinel, and I think this provides them with protection. However, I still worry about the mites living in their fur. Ugh.

Good luck to you!

Good luck!
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replied January 6th, 2011
Hi Misdiagnosed1
You mentioned that people in South America take Ivermectin on a regular basis. This is worrisome, because as the antibacterial soap craze has proven, regular exposure to a toxin eventually creates "superbugs" which are much harder to deal with.
Out of desperation I did something stupid this weekend and experimented on myself by putting EcoSmart organic pesticide all over myself, and then washing it off 10 minutes later.
The next day I felt weak and dizzy, my arms and legs were tingling and I had mild intestinal problems. I may have just had an allergic reaction, because the ingredients are "all natural" although one hasn't been extensively tested for toxicity in humans. 2-Phenethyl Propionate is the main ingredient and is derived from peanut oil. When I looked it up, the toxicity in humans is undetermined.
Silly me. Doctors don't seem to understand the lengths that sane people will go to to get rid of this!

Okay...I think I have some good news for all of us. I had something called 70% Neem oil that I got as an organic insect control for our garden.
Looked it up, and it is used EXTENSIVELY in India for many ailments, also as a treatment for lice and scabies. I mixed a little with hair conditioner last night and put it on my scalp, and this morning, no itching, biting or movement whatsoever!
I will try it next on our dog who is still itching despite applying Revolution.

Take care and hang in there!
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replied January 6th, 2011
Oops, I posted a website where you can buy pure Neem oil at reasonable prices...if interested you'll have to do a search.
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replied January 7th, 2011
Neem and Ivermectin concerns
Thanks for the info about the neem. Let me know if it continues to work. So many things seem like they are working and then don't.

I'm so sorry you went through what you did with the organic pesticide. I felt tingly once when I left Nix on my fingers too long - from rubbing it into my hair/scalp. PLEASE be careful! I have recently started mixing white vinegar with Nature's Gate Lavendar and Tea Tree oil conditioner on my hair instead of shampoo. My hair seems to be clean and the vinegar seems to be dissolving the sticky "glue" that the mites use to stick to my hair. I've used this combo for only about 6 days and am noticing a nice difference. Less sore spots on my scalp, too.

Regarding Ivermectin - it works quite differently than antibiotics. I had the same concern as you did. From what I understand, though, it somehow binds to a molecule that is part of the mite egg and pulls that molecule out of the mite's system so the mite egg can no longer survive. And, unlike antibiotics, Ivermectin works very quickly and is only in your system for about a day and a half at the most. You only need one dosage to rid your system of parasites (and perhaps a follow-up to rid your system of parasites that were not in your system during the first dosage).
Who knows, maybe there will be, someday, a resistancy to how this drug works, but for now, I'm so happy it works!!
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replied January 7th, 2011
Thanks for the info about Ivermectin. Will try to get our doctor to prescribe some for all of us.
My daughter started keeping a bottle of lavender oil on her desk and when she feels biting or crawling, rubs a drop on that area. I do the same with Tea Tree oil.
I used to feel them biting my ankles, so I started vacuuming the floors every day, and then spraying organic insecticide into the bag. I think they're coming in from the back yard, as we've had a lot of rain lately.
I've also heard that vinegar is useful. We used it before when my daughter had head lice, mixed with hair conditioner and meat tenderizer (enzymes)to disrupt their breeding cycle.
Ordering some pure Neem oil today, as the kind I used before had some other undisclosed ingredients that may hurt humans but not plants.
Thanks...Jennifer
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