Medical Questions > Mental Health > Sleep Disorders Forum

During Sleep My Body Temperature Rise to the 100's (Page 9)


January 30th, 2011
I am curious if anyone here has had any of their over heating problems diagnosed circulation issues? Perhaps poor circulation or heart problems? I currently have issues with being being hot, my head will feel very hot when I lay on the pillow it is very unformfortable. My feet are usaully cold during the day but heat up quickly when I fall asleep, even when taking a short nap I wll see an increase in body temp. any feedback on this appreciated.. thanks
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replied February 2nd, 2011
Increased body heat at night
someone please find the answer. I Generally begin to heat up when I'm resting before bed. Then by the time I try to fall asleep it's to late. And the kicker is that it's mostly my feet, however if I do fall asleep, I wake shortly after sweating. It's now the middle of the winter and I still put the AC on to go to bed. To top that off, I have to put an ice pack in bed to rest my feet on. My poor fiance!! I'm not a diabetic and I have no type of fungus or anything. I've been to the dr to rule that out. please help
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Users who thank chadRN for this post: sv12b 

replied February 11th, 2011
Body heat rises while sleeping
My body also get very hot while I am sleeping...mainly from my waist down and I do not wake up or sweat. I had no idea it was happening until I got married last October and my husband told me. Another thing he has noticed, when I complain about being cold my body is warm and when I feel hot my body is cold. My husband refers to me as the radiator.
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replied February 19th, 2011
only hot when i sleep?
i get so hot at night, my blood pressure is golden...it's not that...i would LOVE to know why it is that i can go out in 90 degree weather and play softball and not break a sweat but even in the dead of winter i can't sleep if it's over 45 degrees in the house because i am too hot...
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replied February 27th, 2011
I too have experienced high heat generation during sleep, all my life ( now 50). I've noticed it in younger kids as well. One of my cousins was nicknamed "the blast furnace" at the age of 4 or 5, because if he crawled in bed with you, you'd have to toss off blankets. He produced some serious wattage, but was otherwise completely healthy.

I'm not a doctor but have observed a few things about this:

1. The high heat production seems to occur mostly at the beginning of sleep, in the first few sleep cycles. It tends to diminish the longer you sleep.

2. It occurs most often if I've had a significant meal before sleeping.

3. It can be mitigated by using fewer or lighter blankets. Sometimes this results in waking up cold later in the night, when generating less heat, but you can always add blankets.

4. When sleeping with a partner, the amount of blankets is usually determined by the coldest person, or the one with the lowest metabolism. This can result in a big mismatch in comfort level for the other person, and the sensation of being very warm during sleep.

From these things, I've drawn the following conclusions:

1. Your body continues to digest food and perform other metabolic tasks at the cellular level while you're asleep. Thus your heat generation can persist or even increase while you sleep, even though your muscles are at rest. This should diminish the longer you sleep.

2. If your hands and feet are cold during the day (body preserving core temperature) or you have other signs or reasons for reduced circulation, then at night during horizontal sleep under blankets, your circulation is restored and the body may do some catching up for tissues it couldn't address during the waking period of lesser circulation. In other words, some normal heat-generating metabolic activities are shifted to the sleeping hours. You might notice this as very warm hands or feet on waking.

3. If the problem occurs with a sleeping partner, you might try sleeping separately a few times and adjusting the blankets to your own comfort level. That will determine if a mismatch exists, and then you can work it out together.

I don't think that moderate extra heat generation during sleep is necessarily a sign of medical problems. People just have different metabolic rates and diurnal body cycles. Some people have mentioned excessive sweating at night. That shouldn't happen unless the body is unable to cool itself via circulation ( example, sleeping in a hot & humid environment). It could be a sign of other problems. If adjusting blankets or the sleeping environment to their own comfort level doesn't alleviate the sweating, then you might want to consult a doctor.
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replied March 4th, 2011
Please Assist with research
Recent research gave me an idea, I would like to ask you all a question. Does anyone with this condition ALSO
1. suffer from constipation?
2. have 'fast healing' for cuts/ scrapes?
3. thick hair (on head)?
4. Are you nocturnal?
5. any excessive peeing?
6. unexplained weight gain or loss?

I would really love your assistance, who knows - I may use this for my thesis!

Cheers

fi
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replied May 1st, 2011
1. Often
2. Yes
3. Yes
4. Yes
5. Often, Yes
6. Sometimes, not very often.

Why these questions? I'm intrigued!
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replied May 24th, 2011
Hi

Hope this helps.

1. Yes
2. Not really
3. Fine Hair
4. No
5. I pee a lot anyway, cause I drink heaps of water
6. No

Good luck, keep us posted.
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replied March 6th, 2011
The Body's Themoregulation During Sleep
I found an article which provides some useful information: The Body's Themoregulation During Sleep
Here's the link > http://www.sleepdex.org/thermoregulation.h tm It my not have all the answers but it does provide some clues to many of the symptoms everyone is describing.
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replied March 6th, 2011
Here is some additional information on the topic.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Body_temperat ure
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replied March 6th, 2011
I found this link and I think it's interesting, I am not alone. I am a female, just hit 40 and for the past few years my body temp seems to rise when I am asleep. It can be uncomfortable for me, since the bed gets very hot and it wakes me up, I have to move around to not feel my own heat. I have to sleep with the fan on and under the blankets. My partner pulls off the blankets because I feel so hot. Yet I am cold and need the blankets on me. Although many people seem to go through what I go through, no one seems to have a reason why.
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replied March 19th, 2011
I am a 34-year-old female and I have been this way for as long as I can remember. I am usually cold during the day, especially my hands and feet, but within 30 minutes of falling asleep my body is already warming up. I don't usually sweat, although there have been rare occurrences over the years. I wear socks to bed initially but they usually come off around 3-4am when I'm finally hot enough to wake up and shed them. We keep the house at 60 degrees during winter and sleep with a sheet, an all-season duvet, and one heavy winter blanket. We keep the house at 80 degrees during summer and sleep with only the sheet. The duvet is sufficient during spring and fall. My husband cannot lie next to me for any amount of time without becoming quite uncomfortable from the heat I'm radiating.

My blood work always comes back normal (thyroid, hormones, blood iron). I have carried two babies to term without complication, but I do not ovulate regularly. I function best when I'm "early to bed, early to rise" and I live in a city with four distinct seasons. I have an athletic build and have been 5'6" and 110-120lbs for the last 20 years (sans pregnancies). I don't eat red meat or pork, I don't drink alcohol or caffeine, and I don't smoke or use drugs. I drink adequate water during the day and don't wake with body aches or pains. The occasional headache I get comes from nights I didn't get the eight hours of sleep I so desperately need.

I've just always figured this is how I am and something changes in my metabolism while I sleep. Oh, and I am a VERY deep sleeper. Not sure if others are also deep sleepers, but I'll throw it out there anyway.
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replied April 12th, 2011
Deep Breathing
I think it's possible that your sleep temperature problem might have to do with breathing.
Some people breathe shalloly at night, while others, especially athletic people, breathe more deeply. Deep, full breaths begin to warm the body after only a few breaths.
You might ask your husband if you breathe "heavily" at night. Not snoring, just heavy breathing.

I'm not a doctor, but I know more than one person who's body temp rises during sleep, and they are all athletic and breathe heavily at night.
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replied March 19th, 2011
Have your doctors check your vitamin and mineral levels.....that is where all other ailment's start from when we do not get enough nutrtion....especially VITAMIN D3...Nature Sunshine is the best product's on the earth, they have a little Health Assessment you can do!.....Don't take no for an answer and make sure the complete test are done!

My husband is going through this heat thing..he does tend to drink a little more than he should and he is on two high blood pressure meds and also smokes! So...let's try to find out how to take care of this....keep in touch.
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replied March 28th, 2011
you better test your ABGs in sleep , this may give you a clue. Elevated CO2 levels in ABGs may be indicative of Sleep Apnea.I feel that co2 is shunted out in the form of chills. Any way study this angle also - Sri
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replied April 2nd, 2011
I read most of the posts on this thread...
I think it's the blood pressure/blood sugar/cholestrol levels.
Try to lower your energy as much as possible before sleep. You can do this by exercising before sleep, but DO NOT do it right before. Keep it at least 2 hours away from your sleep time.
Also, eating before sleep is a terrible thing-- it also causes a high body temperature at sleep.
Drink lots of water. Keep off the heart killing foods, such as meat and dairy. Don't eat too much sugar, even fruits can be bad. Just try to eat as many veggies as possible.
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replied April 2nd, 2011
I read most of the posts on this thread...
I think it's the blood pressure/blood sugar/cholestrol levels.
Try to lower your energy as much as possible before sleep. You can do this by exercising before sleep, but DO NOT do it right before. Keep it at least 2 hours away from your sleep time.
Also, eating before sleep is a terrible thing-- it also causes a high body temperature at sleep.
Drink lots of water. Keep off the heart killing foods, such as meat and dairy. Don't eat too much sugar, even fruits can be bad. Just try to eat as many veggies as possible.

Also, DO NOT EAT a big dinner at least two hours before sleep. First of all, it causes excessive heat production. Most importantly, it's extremely unhealthy, causes the accumulation of fat, and makes you wake up tired. You may feel like you're sleeping well, but your body becomes tired because it had to keep metabolising food during sleep. It's hard work for the body.

There's a saying from where I come from:
Eat breakfast like a noble, at lunch like a commoner, and dinner like a peasant.
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replied April 9th, 2011
Simple Changes to Help Reduce Sleep Sweats
There are some easy tricks you could try to regulate your body temperature before bed. Of course if it's more serious, consulting a doctor would be best. Try making some changes to your 'before bed' routine. Taking a warm bath is a great way to dissolve stress and tension, as well as relaxing you while preparing your body for sleep. The warm water raises your core body temperature initially but later it cools faster which helps pave the path to sleep. Careful not to take a bath right before bed though, as your core body temperature won’t have enough time to cool down to the temperature needed for bed time.

Also never under estimate the power your bed and sheets have over your quality of sleep. You spend an awful lot of time in your bed during your life. It's wise to invest in some good sheets and mattress. Purchase sheets that breathe and also when making your bed, keep it tight. This will promote a more comfortably sleep where there's little chance to feel suffocated on get wrapped up in your sleep.
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replied April 16th, 2011
wow I can't beleive how long this forum is going on for and there is still no real solution.
I am a healthy 22 yr old female and suddenly started to get really hot in the night. I actaully feel cold but my partner tells me I give off a lot of heat. It doesn't wake me up as much anymore. I have never been a sweaty person and the times that I do it doesn't smell. Now I wake up covered in dried sweat and its smells. does anyone else suffer from this? Also i sleep in a cold room, with cool bedding so it's definately not my environment. If I come across any solutions I will be posting.
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replied April 26th, 2011
I come with no answer, my apologies.

I'm female, and fourteen years old. I've been noticing throughout the last year or so that I too have been increasingly hot at night. Well, it's not just at night- if I lay down or fall asleep at any time I always feel this way. I live in Maine, and this occurs year round- even throughout the Winter season. It's April 26th right now, and for those of you who don't know, it's only about 45 degrees outside(it's night)- maybe 70 indoors. I kick the covers off constantly and throw the pillows to the ground in frustration- I can never seem to get comfortable due to my body heat. I've never thought to actually measure it, but I think tomorrow when my mother's awake- I'll ask to keep the thermometer. Anyways, my mother and I have both been diagnosed with insomnia- the "...difficulty getting to sleep or staying asleep, or having nonrefreshing sleep for at least 1 month". I stay up until 3:00 a.m. on school mornings, and wake up at 6:00. This is all because of the fact that I'm too hot to sleep! The worst part is, I have the coldest room in the house... it's in the basement. Obviously, I've never had anyone sleep on my bed with me for sexual reasons(I'm 14), but my now ex-boyfriend used to comment on how warm my face was- but how cold and clammy my hands were. My mom, I apologize for referring to her so frequently, says they're too dead-like and refuses to touch them. My once perfect straight A+ grades are dropping because I'm too exhausted at school to pay attention- I really need some advise.

I now sleep with sheets only, take a cold shower before "bed time". Nothing seems to help the condition though.
I don't know why this is happening, but if someone of age with the same problems could please contact a doctor, and post their recommendation, I would deeply appreciate it C;
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replied May 2nd, 2011
This is what worked for me.
I've had this as long as I can remember--my dad has the same issues too.

I stopped using feather blankets. I thought it would insulate but it did not for me. I wore blankets that had cotton, it helped to dispel the heat and soak up the humidity from my body.

I felt that my body was trying to tell me that there was some kind of "blockage" in my body so I started doing yoga. I figured, why not, I get some sort of exercise too.

My muscles started getting looser, my blood was flowing better, I was breathing better, I stopped feeling cold when the temperature dropped unnoticeable to most people, my hands and feet were not ice cold when everyone else was fine. I felt that I was able to regulate whatever in my body that was not being regulated or was not able to get regulated before.

It's almost like it relieved some kind of pressure that was developing in my body, something the body wasn't able to adjust before.

I liked this way better because it's more natural, without having to take medication. I know this might sound new-agey to some, but it's what worked for me, and I hope that this method works for others.
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replied May 11th, 2011
I have found the answer.....

O.K. after 10 years of suffering from the high heat whilst sleeping problem, I have finally found an answer. I not only suffer from extreme heat whilst sleeping, but when my head gets too hot at night I get a migraine headache that keeps me in bed for 4 days out of 7. This is debilatating and I am unable to hold down a job. My problems were all caused by a car accident that almost ended my life, until then I did not have the heat issue nor the migraines.

After much research and reading all of your comments and taking them into serious consideration, I believe that the problem is caused by the liver. The reason you cannot get an answer from your Dr is because they just don't know. I have been seeing a Naturopath who does iridology and many other modalities and I am seeing results.

The Chinese believe that certain foods heat us up and cool us down. I know this to be true for me as I use ginger tea in winter to warm me up and it does it like no other. It requires dietary changes and not a lot of people are prepared to go to this length. If you are interested I am happy to share what I have found is working for me.
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replied May 21st, 2011
Please can you share what you found out! Which foods and drinks cool can cool you down in summer?
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replied May 24th, 2011
High Temps
I have found eating chilli, garlic and ginger heat up your body temperature. I am a lover of all these foods.I am like everyone else, my feet and hands get cold and my body has lost the ability to control my temperature. I normally feel the cold in winter, so I was drinking ginger tea to help warm me up. Stick to the most natural of foods, such as lettuce tomatoes,carrots (fruits and veg) and anything that has not been messed with (like packet and tinned foods). This eliminates preservatives and chemicals etc. Even better if you can afford to buy organic fruit and vegetables.

For me I have found that I cannot drink any alcohol, this definitely raises my body temperature, even just 1 glass. I have noticed that a lot of people with this problem seem to be men. This begs the question of all the wives that have written on here about their husbands, do they have a beer or 2 at night or late afternoon after a hard days work?

Avoid hot drinks, coffee etc after lunch time. Try to have protein at each meal, just a small amount (size of the palm of your hand). Drink lots of water.

I will come back to you with a whole list of herbal teas and foods that lower your temperature.

Hope this helps for now.
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replied May 31st, 2011
Hi
Thanks for your post sure It can help some of us suffering of that strange illness...
Can you tell me what you did to help u get rid of overheating when sleeping ?
Thnaks
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replied May 11th, 2011
Can't sleep body temp to high help is on the way!
Have read everbody's posting and have the same issue, but try this tonight ok take a dish towel wet it with cold water and wrap it around your neck, your pillow might be a little wet in the morning but you'll sleep like a baby!!! Also if you ever don't want to vomit use the same principle towel on belly, after about an hour that towel will radiate the heat from the upset tummy and then just repeat the process until belly aching is gone!I'm sure this is all about to body Chemistry that pretty complex.
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