Medical Questions > Parenting > Parenting Debate Forum

Water Births/home Births? (Page 4)


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August 20th, 2007
Especially eHealthy
Anne123 wrote:
Lol. Oh, Georgia! Smile

I have heard that some insurance companies in the US do cover homebirths and midwife services (depends on the state - in some states it isn't technically legal).

If homebirth is something you're seriously interested in, you could check out your insurance coverage and make sure you're with a company that does cover homebirth.... before you even ttc.


If you're lucky enough to have a job that gives you good insurance. Otherwise you're stuck up a creek with no paddle- and paying WAY too much for simple procedures, like hundreds just for blood tests or x rays. I have insurance now but it sucks- it only covers accidents or death or procedures that are considered necessary to keep me alive. No birth control, no checkups, etc. Don't feel too bad for me because come January I am going to have better insurance, but the point is, our system sucks right now.

Sorry, it's just a topic that gets me going..... grumble grumble......
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replied August 20th, 2007
Experienced User
Sorry, I thought health insurance was something that each individual shopped around for and paid individually for (or for the family)... like car insurance.
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replied August 20th, 2007
Especially eHealthy
Anne123 wrote:
Sorry, I thought health insurance was something that each individual shopped around for and paid individually for (or for the family)... like car insurance.


Not really... most people get it from their job and it's often not good.
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replied August 20th, 2007
Experienced User
Okay.... sorry this is going way off topic.... I just have no idea how the system works in the US.

Can't you purchase supplemental insurance if your insurance at work sucks?
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replied August 20th, 2007
Especially eHealthy
Anne123 wrote:
Okay.... sorry this is going way off topic.... I just have no idea how the system works in the US.

Can't you purchase supplemental insurance if your insurance at work sucks?

Yes but it is very expensive, and if you're in a job that has bad insurance, it most likely doesn't pay a lot, so you can't afford outside insurance...
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replied August 21st, 2007
Experienced User
Right. That makes sense. That really sucks!!!!

Even if you have decent insurance you have to worry about copayment and deductibles, etc. which could be very costly.

(Making a mental note never to vote for a politician wanting to privatize the Canadian health care system)
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replied August 21st, 2007
Especially eHealthy
Anne123 wrote:
Right. That makes sense. That really sucks!!!!

Even if you have decent insurance you have to worry about copayment and deductibles, etc. which could be very costly.

(Making a mental note never to vote for a politician wanting to privatize the Canadian health care system)


Definitely don't or healthcare will be as crappy there as it is here. I was paying $290 a month for insurance (through a big name company) that covers nothing. Which I found out after I purchased the insurance. We're actually better off with no insurance. Since I have to pay full price for everything anyway at least I'm keeping that $290 in my pocket. Then again if I had $989 to spend each month on the insurance premium then the insurance company would pay for pretty much everything. Unfortunately I don't have a thousand dollars a month to spend on insurance...not if I want to have somewhere to live and food to eat.
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replied August 21st, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
My sister is a Labor and Delivery nurse. I asked her if the hospital she works at has the birthing tub, and they do, but the nurses refuse to use it because it's a pain in the butt to clean/sanitize before and after. She says "would you want to get into a tub with another human's bodily fluids?" which is exactly what happens. Someone has to get in to assist the mother when she's laboring and delivering. UGH gross
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replied August 21st, 2007
Experienced User
Well, in the case of homebirth I'd be purchasing a tub (or using my bathtub). My husband might get in with me, but probably not.

I'm confused... if it's been cleaned then you're not getting in a tub with another person's fluids. Also, there's no reason for anyone else to need to be in the tub with the birthing mother.
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replied August 21st, 2007
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I had a simple hand injury recently and ended up paying about $400 for two visits....

and that was when I had good insurance!! Why did my husband quit that job......??

ok we can stop talking about this now, I'll just get more upset.
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replied August 21st, 2007
Especially eHealthy
Anne123 wrote:
Well, in the case of homebirth I'd be purchasing a tub (or using my bathtub). My husband might get in with me, but probably not.

I'm confused... if it's been cleaned then you're not getting in a tub with another person's fluids. Also, there's no reason for anyone else to need to be in the tub with the birthing mother.


No, you're not getting in with someone else's fluids, you're in with your own. But whoever else has to get in the tub with you to help you, is *technically* getting into a tub with "someone else's" fluids.

Personally the concept of that doesn't gross me out at all, since they're natural fluids that are supposed to come out during birth.
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replied August 21st, 2007
Experienced User
Oh! Thanks Eiri - that's not how I read it.

Anytime I've seen a hospital or birthing center birth tub (on tv), the OB/midwife wears giant gloves that go all the way up to her armpit (like the ones a veterinarian wears to put their arm inside a cow). They sit/stand beside the tub and reach in with their gloved arm.

Any L&D worker who doesn't like something (such as a waterbirth) because of the inconvenience to them isn't thinking about mom & baby as a priority.
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replied August 21st, 2007
Especially eHealthy
Don't bodily fluids kind've get everywhere when you're having any kind of birth?
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replied August 21st, 2007
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Georgia59 wrote:
Don't bodily fluids kind've get everywhere when you're having any kind of birth?


I know, right? Birth isn't a "clean" process.
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replied August 22nd, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
I don't think she was saying it was an inconvienence, but more so that nobody is really comfortable with immersing their body parts in water that has amniotic fluid, blood, placenta, feces, etc in it. Would you be?
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replied August 22nd, 2007
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Mommy35 wrote:
I don't think she was saying it was an inconvienence, but more so that nobody is really comfortable with immersing their body parts in water that has amniotic fluid, blood, placenta, feces, etc in it. Would you be?


To my knowledge, there shouldn't be any feces or there's a problem... if a fetus defecates (unusual in the first place) don't they induce labor?

And for the other liquids, I don't really mind.

The only thing I find gross to be immersed in water with would be food particles (think, washing the dishes) or long wet hair (oh gross gross gross!)
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replied August 22nd, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
Eiri wrote:


To my knowledge, there shouldn't be any feces or there's a problem...


It's not unusual for a woman to defecate while in labour - particularly when the baby's head is moving down the birth canal and puts pressure on the bowels.

Ah the dignity!
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replied August 22nd, 2007
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Really???

Ewww!!! I don't want that to happen to me!!
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replied August 22nd, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
Yeah, your pushing and if it's in there, it's not in there for long. Even the docs that work in that hospital don't want to use it, so it isn't just the L&D nurses who hate it, it's everyone.
I gag at the sheer thought of it, but then that would be the #1 reason I didn't follow in my mother and sister's footsteps of being a nurse. Bodily fluids=gross for me
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replied August 22nd, 2007
Experienced User
Yes, women defecate during labor. It is very very common.... your body is pushing hard (even if you're not).

If you're able to move around during labor because you're not hooked up to machines/IVs (yay homebirth) you can keep going to the toilet whenever you feel the need.

If it happens in the tub, a little fish net is handy. Whatever.

Delivery attendents are so accustomed to it, it doesn't even phase them. One friend of mine had a hospital birth. She pooped on the bed during a contraction and the nurse had it cleaned away so quickly that she barely even realized it happened - and her husband didn't even notice it at all!

Again.... there's no reason for a birth attendant to get into the tub with you so it shouldn't be an issue.
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