Medical Questions > Conditions and Diseases > Hypoglycemia Forum

Time frame for reactive hypoglycemia ?

For over 9 years I have been having terrible fatigue and weakness episodes, which usually occur after meals. Have not been tested for reactive hypoglycemia. I have read that reactive hypoglycemia symptoms usually occur about 2 to 3 hours after eating. I have these episodes much sooner, sometimes 15-30 minutes after eating, sometimes before I'm even done with the meal. Is that inconsistent with reactive hypoglycemia, or should I ask to be tested for it?

Thanks,
Lovemycav
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First Helper Tesss
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replied February 1st, 2010
That is totally consistent with reactive hypoglycemia, particularly someone who is very reactive. I react like you do. Your body produces an enzyme called amylase that begins to break down carbohydrates almost immediately. Amylase is in your saliva. This means that if you eat a fast acting carbohydrate you will get the glucose from that carbohydrate into your blood stream very quickly. Literally within minutes. I know I have definitely eaten something wrong when that happens.

Take note of what types of food cause this reaction. My guess is that they are simple carbohydrates (bread, potatoes, pasta, white rice) and definitely sugar. I suggest you modify your eating habits. Begin by eating your protein. It is good to have a little fat as well to help slow down the digestion. Then eat your carbohydrates. Your carbohydrates should consist of vegetables for the most part. Avoid potatoes, root vegetables (squash, turnip, beets, rutabaga). Eat lots of green leafy vegetables and vegetables like brocolli and cauliflower.
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replied February 1st, 2010
Does healthy eating eliminate attacks?
Thank you so much, akrockley.

One more question, if I may... Do you ever have the symptoms even when you *do* modify your eating?

Yes, I have learned that eating simple carbs on an empty stomach will often provoke a bad attack, but on doctor's advice I went on the South Beach diet faithfully for several months, and still had attacks. That is why they didn't test for the hypoglycemia. Was that a valid reason to rule it out?
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replied February 1st, 2010
Yes I still have symptoms when I do modify my eating, though not usually in 15 minutes. Typically it is 30-60 minutes for me.

One of your issues may be what you are eating. For example, I can't tolerate grains except for rolled oats so even if I eat whole grain wheat for example, I will get a glycemic reaction. Milk, yogourt and cottage cheese (milk lactose) cause me to react. These are probably food intolerances (allergies). There are 5 hypoglycemics in my family and all of them can eat more than I can and each have different triggers!

The South Beach diet is a good diet for hypoglycemics but some of the foods may still be triggers for you. Watch very carefully what you eat. What triggers a glycemic reaction. Can you try taking foods out of your diet to test what works and what doesn't? Common triggers are grains and dairy.

A friend of mine discovered her trigger was mint and any food with salicylates in them. Once she removed them, food was pretty boring but she didn't get hypoglycemic attacks any more.

Are you getting enough sleep? Lack of sleep (less than about 7 hours) makes your system very trigger happy. Things that are fine when I feel well, push me over the edge when I am tired or stressed.

Good luck.
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replied April 13th, 2010
Hello, I find vinegar lowers my blood sugar immediately and any food with glucose in it (Tuc biscuits are bad - if you have those). Oats are good, I find milk good, although I see others can''t take it. Caffeine bad. Small meals often is the key I find. Any kind of sugar substitute is bad - does anyone else find this? We are told to avoid real sugar but I find asparatane worse and I have stabilised since avoiding all sugar substitutes (and real sugar as much as possible).
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replied April 29th, 2010
Hi Akrockley

I get a similar reaction time if I eat something that is causing me an issue. Last summer I had blood tests for food intolerances and it came back with a lot of items that caused reactions, dairy, wheat, eggs and preservatives etc but I am ok with rolled oats. I''m still getting to grips with this diet but having those tests have definelty changed my health
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replied October 21st, 2010
my heart goes out to all of you. i'm new at this but really struggling to find a balance in my diet. just a note to all too...my reactive hypoglycemia was found only immediately after i quit smoking. just a general tip

has anyone else ever experienced a very bad immediate crash upon eating eggs?

and is this thing ever gonna go away..?
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replied October 21st, 2010
Yes, fast drops
toot79, sorry to tell you, but it is not going away.

lovemycav, yes I also drop fast at times, 15-30 minutes is not unheard of.

Also even with the right diet, you can drop. With me this is due to catecholamine release that eats up the little bit of glucose I have circulating.

I have been "dealing" with RH now for about 3 years, and it is not getting easier. Even if I figure out something that helps, it is temporary, because my system just changes. I was taken out of work on disability and spend 24/7 taking care of myself. I wear a continuous monitor, but it doesn't catch the quick drops. I am using Sandostatin 30 meq sub-Q injections 3 times a day, it gives me some good days. I was able to drive one day this week, it was a good day.

It is nice, but sad to find others with ideas on how to handle this monster, thinking of you all. I think with the increase in gastric by-pass surgeries there will be more of us and maybe medicine will become more aware of ways to help. It is scary to know that you have to explain this problem to EVERYONE that takes care of you. I am a nurse and believe me, you want to make sure people are with you that know how to take care of you when you go for medical care or to the hospital. I have actually explained the "NO GLUCOSE" intake in the emergency room, then have them mix me up a contrast for cat-scan, only to ask for bottle the med was in, first ingredient-sucrose, OMGosh.......really learn all you can about RH. Remember that even IV fluids may have more glucose than you can tolerate. The last time I had dental surgery they had to order D5 1/2 NS to use if my glucose dropped while I was asleep, a bolus of regular D5LR has too much glucose for us with RH, we will spike to only drop quicker than they will check us. I have them check my glucose regularly when sedated, and not be fooled by the normal readings, it can change fast.

OK climbing down off of the soapbox, sorry, just worry about those who have this, there is so little known about it.

Bev
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replied October 22nd, 2010
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lululow wrote:
Hello, I find vinegar lowers my blood sugar immediately and any food with glucose in it (Tuc biscuits are bad - if you have those). Oats are good, I find milk good, although I see others can''t take it. Caffeine bad. Small meals often is the key I find. Any kind of sugar substitute is bad - does anyone else find this? We are told to avoid real sugar but I find asparatane worse and I have stabilised since avoiding all sugar substitutes (and real sugar as much as possible).


Stevia, actually, is totally fine. But ONLY purchase the kind you find at health food stores. I prefer raw (it's a green powder), but refined (white like sugar but more like powdered sugar) is fine. Everyone in this thread should be aware, when you start eating right, expect to feel HORRIBLE for a little while, sometimes a few months, before you start getting back on track.
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replied October 26th, 2010
Not to contradict anyone, but stevia contains fructose. If I have fructose my blood sugar drops like a stone-so just beware.
I have to avoid all fruit and some veg and anything pre-made. If you are suffering and can't control your blood sugar consider fructose as a potential trigger.
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replied October 26th, 2010
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But make sure you're tested for an allergy or sensitivity to it, which is VERY rare. And where did you get this information about fructose? I'm pretty sure that's totally incorrect. Stevia, if you get the kind at a health food store, is from a leaf. If there is any fructose in it, it's quanity is so low it would be impossible for it to make a difference unless you had a fructose allergy. Please keep in mind I'm talking primarily about the raw or processed form of Stevia found in health food stores, NOT the stuff you can get at Wal Mart or something. There is nothing on their information sheets that says fructose, which should be indicated if there is any. I'd like to see where you got this data.
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replied October 26th, 2010
No need to attack me Stan, aren't we all here to help each other? And we'll all know something different - everyone's contribution should be welcome.

Fructose intolerance is actually not as rare as you make out and can cause horrible symptoms, and in me it affects my blood sugar badly. I'm sure I'm not alone and I'm sure it'll also affect some others in the same way. I'm just trying to highlight something else that people might want to consider, that they may not have come across.

I'm not going to say any more because I don't feel welcome on this board - since I've been on it I've not found it to be very friendly - and I don't want everyone to jump down my throat if I say anything. Stevia isn't recommended for the fructose intolerance diet (source: UK National Dietician).
Pls remember also that products vary by country - the states may be big but it's not the whole world!
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replied October 26th, 2010
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Well, if that's the case then yes, but from information on the web concerning Stevia, there is no fructose in it. It must be not recommended for another reason. Link? I wasn't jumping down your throat, just wanted clarity on this issue. Were you tested for fructose intolerance? Keep in mind that it's a serious disease, not just something you 'feel'. If you had it you'd have kidney problems and sometimes jaundice. It's a very serious condition. Be very careful of fad diagnoses, that's how they push you out of the door to keep you happy. If you weren't tested for it and you think you have it, you should get tested before you face kidney failure, because that's what eventually happens. Not sure why you don't feel welcome here, if it's because you're afraid your ideas are incorrect, then good luck elsewhere. Otherwise, if you're here to learn something, stay.
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replied December 3rd, 2017
Kidney Problems and Jaundice
Goodness this is a forever old post. If you are still active will you please respond. I am super interested in the comments in reference to kidney problems and jaundice..
thank you in advance.
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replied October 26th, 2010
I don't feel welcome because no-one helped me in my plea for help. I was desperate for some help. I post on and use other forums that are more welcoming.

I don't have to justify myself here, but I suspect that I know a lot more about fructose intolerance than you. As a sufferer I know what it means to have it, and yes I've been diagnosed by a healthcare professional (and I'm not going to go into detail on the tests etc). Don't believe everything you read about it though, and be careful not to mix up hereditary fructose intolerance and dietary fructose intolerance.

Well hope I've helped a little, I think we should stop hijacking this other persons thread with our argument.

All the best.
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replied October 26th, 2010
Also
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replied October 26th, 2010
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To which plea for help are you referring?
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replied February 11th, 2011
listen, i had the same thing, chances are your a nervous person, right after i used to eat, i would feel faint fatigue, dizzy, extremely nervous, and i though it would never fix, if i didnt eat breakfast before i would feel terrible, like seriousley, thank god i found the answer, for my case and for many other cases its actually hyperventilation, we breathe too much, and its part of the hypoglyemia, insulin levels rise too quickly, and cause a fight or flight response which makes you feel like junk, u have to slow your breahing, because your breathing wayyyy to fast, by controlling your breahing your controlling your fight or flight, just like i was, try it atleast for one day, u really have nothing lose, go to youtube and type in bukeyko breathing, im helping becuase i looked for answers just like you and i was desperate, also becuase its an amazing thing to b able to help people in need, i dont ask for a thank you of any sort, just go and live a happy life, praise the lord, and id like to ask u to find the time to help someone else who experiences the same symptoms, becuase there are more people out there who really need help, i really hope this helps u like it helped me, P.S. im moderately hypoglycemic, i didnt have breakfast today, im concentrating fine, and feel great, (very hungry right now but very clear headed) thanks and god bless
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