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TB Survivor Report: 3.5 Years After Onset of Symptoms (Page 1)

Hello Everyone.

I wanted to write this report for all of you who 1) suspect that they have TB, 2) have decided and are undergoing treatment, 3) have completed treatment and are recuperating, and, 4) some time after treatment, wonder if what they're feeling post-treatment is normal or not.

The report's goal is to provide information, encouragement, and hope sunny

For reference, in 2008 I was 54 years old when I had active TB (when the TB bacteria, which I probably harbored for many years, finally overcame my immune system). My Body Mass Index was perfect; I wasn't taking any required medication and didn't smoke or take alcohol. I was physically active, had regular exercise, but had a high-stress job and was getting just 5-6 hours of sleep each night.

Here's my report:

1) 3.5 years ago (May/June 2008), I started having a feeling of malaise (like a very mild flu) and my voice was hoarse almost every morning when waking up. I didn't feel like biking and running, my regular weekly exercises. I felt mildly sick, but still able to work. I had a fever-like sensation most afternoons lasting about 3-4 hours. I began coughing - although not constantly and with some phlegm but no blood - around September, 3 months after the malaise condition. My doctor, if I remember correctly, believed my symptoms weren't alarming enough for a chest x-ray and the rest of the TB/pulmonary diagnostic routine but prescribed antibiotics. The antibiotics made me feel a little better but didn't restore my previous health.

2) After tolerating my off/on health condition for 4 months, which by then had deteriorated to feeling weak and having blood streaks in my phlegm, I decided to get a total pulmonary exam (x-ray, breath volume, bronchoscopy/biopsy). The bronchoscop/biopsy finally revealed the presence of TB bacteria in my right lung. The doctors immediately sent me to the Department of Health for treatment.

3) My regimen was the full TB treatment cocktail every day for 6 months. I never failed with this regimen (I didn't want to die!), which was helped along by the Department of Health requiring me to show up every day at their clinic for the entire period.

4) What I felt during the 6-month treatment: The sense of healing (i.e. disappearance of cough, fever-like sensation in the afternoons, and malaise) was very, very slow. It almost felt like I wasn't getting better. In retrospect, I realize now that the rate of TB overcoming the body is similar to the rate of the body overcoming the TB (slow to get sick, slow to get well). So, patience and faith that one will get well are crucial during the treatment stage.

5) The fever-like sensation in the afternoons persisted after treatment up to - unbelievably - 3 years after treatment. While I felt good enough to resume exercise after treatment, I was having the pseudo-fever about 4 out of 7 days. I considered taking antibiotics thinking that maybe "there's some straggling TB bacteria remaining" but really, all those germs were exterminated during the treatment. I believe now that the post-treatment symptoms are really from TB-damaged tissues that the body is trying to heal. You've probably read that TB is a "tissue- and cell-consuming disease."

6) After treatment, I decided to dive back fully into exercise and...under the sun. Prior to my TB becoming active, I remember not having enough sunlight. I was running and biking but those activities amounted to 90 minutes/week at most. Post-treatment, what I noticed was that I wouldn't experience any fever or malaise while under the sun, exercising. Maybe the physical effort is masking the symptoms, but I would feel better all the time while being physically active. So I began spending more time absorbing sunlight.

7) Diet: before undergoing full diagnostics and treatment, I thought that eating more nutritious food will help me fight my unknown sickness. I gained some weight (I wasn't really losing any during the disease) but didn't get any better. Certainly, a TB patient shouldn't starve, but it's important to eat smart (vegetables, minimal preservatives in food, etc.), not more. I've been a healthy eater anyway, so this wasn't a problem.

8.) 3.5 years after: I think today I can declare myself 98% free of TB symptoms. I've not taken any TB medication since the end of the formal treatment, have eaten well and exercised regularly, having been sleeping at least 8 hours/night, and gotten sufficient sun exposure. I'm turning 58 this month, and I feel very good. I still clear my throat every now and then of phlegm, and have some evening headaches, but other than those discomforts, I think I've got a good number of years ahead.

9) Reflection: I now realize that, without treatment, TB would have killed me. I'm almost certain of that. Just as important, I realize that I ignored the work/life balance where I over-stressed the importance of work and making money that I disregarded the other more important aspects of life. Faith has a lot to do with my recovery, in the sense that if I had been true to my faith, I would've taken at least one day of complete rest and rejuvenation per week. I'm following that very faithfully now. Also, mental stress affects physical health so again, it's critical to understand the intended meaning of life (work to live or live to work?/pursuit of love, peace, & harmony/etc.)

10) Final message at this stage: active TB is a fatal disease. If you have the least suspicion that you have it, seek treatment and religiously follow it. Reassess your life priorities and pursue balance. You WILL get well. You CAN live a more meaningful and fulfilling life after treatment. Be optimistic, positive, and spiritual, but combine these behaviors with professional medical treatment doctor

Wishing everyone a better life after TB! 2thumbs

TBFree
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First Helper TBFree
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replied February 8th, 2012
hello
hello TBfree, is it okay to go to the gym while still taking the meds? My bf started working out/gym on his 5th month of medication. He told me that it gives him a good feeling when he's doing it. Thanks!
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Users who thank jewelrybox for this post: TBGirl 

replied February 10th, 2012
Experienced User
I will recommend that he gets his doctor's clearance just in case.

However, as a TB victim and survivor my opinion is that working out is OK; aerobics in particular increases oxygen intake which in turn promotes healing of TB-damaged tissues/cells.

Although I started working out after treatment, I can confirm your BF's claim that it improves a sense of well-being.

The big assumption here is that one has adequate sleep & rest and is eating properly while working out during the treatment period.

Hope this helps.
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replied February 26th, 2012
hi there,

im a tb patient and has been in tb treatment for over 8-9 months
what i want to ask you is that in the last 2 month of my treatment, there is a moment that its hard to breathe and there is discomfort in my chest
when i ask my doctor, she said its normal, because the lungs in recovering from the damage tissue. Are you having the same post effect tb treatment just like me ?
Thx
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replied February 26th, 2012
Experienced User
Here's what I recall: at the peak of TB's effects on my body, there was slight but yet very abnormal pain in my chest area while, say, taking deep breaths. It was definitely uncomfortable.

The pain and discomfort stayed with me while I was taking medication (6 months) but diminished over time. The last time I remember having the pain was probably 12 months after the end of treatment.

You said "hard to breathe." That's true, although for someone who hasn't had TB, it's probably hard to understand. For us TB survivors, it means almost a total-body discomfort and difficulty, not only in breathing, but doing everything else. Am I right in saying that?

For example, I would feel restless because there's a sensation of unexpelled phlegm or, for lack of a better description, a "wounded lung." To test myself, I would exhale hard and would hear a whiz-like noise from my lungs. Many times, I would have a "prickly" sensation in my head, not really fever, but a feeling similar to a strange allergic reaction.

All to say, during and after medication, I would feel abnormal. One way of defining "abnormal" is remembering when we were at our healthiest stage, maybe as a teenager, a young adult, or even as a pre-teen (and when we weren't smoking, drinking, or doing everything in excess).

That would be my reference point, and I think you'll agree that we've become very sick from TB.

When I think about it today, I realize how I was marching slowly but surely towards death if I didn't have treatment.

Let's all think in terms of our lungs (if such is the case, since TB can damage other organs) as a visible part of the body that was, for the sake of illustration, a burned hand.

How would we feel while the hand was healing itself? The fire (TB bacteria) that caused the burn (damaged lung) has since been extinguished, and yet we continue to feel the pain and discomfort of healing. Meantime, we do everything possible to promote healing of the burned hand, right?

It's the very same scenario with our lungs. We just don't see our damaged lungs, but they're trying to heal. So, how do we accelerate healing? Nutrition, sleep & rest, exercise, and a positive attitude.

Hopefully I've painted a picture that explains our situation better.

The really good news is that almost 4 years later, I'm very near that state of pure health (my reference point is when I was 13-14 years old).

You'll get there. The pain and discomfort are, again, signs of injured lungs. Nurse those lungs to health by getting enough rest and sleep, nutrition, and exercise.
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replied March 25th, 2012
TB medication
I'm on my 5th month medication for TB and i'm still having trouble with the phlegm on my throat. Have you experienced this? or maybe i'm not responding well with the medication? My doctor also said that i should avoid eating chicken. I stopped eating chicken for 3 weeks and when i ate once, i seem to have more trouble with the phlegm on my throat.
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replied March 25th, 2012
Experienced User
I was producing phlegm up to 2 years after treatment, although in diminishing quantity. As I've posted earlier, the presence of phlegm and any other symptoms doesn't mean we still have TB; they're signs of tissues and cells damaged by the TB bacteria. It's important that we undertake a program to repair our bodies by having sufficient sleep, a nutritious diet, and plenty of sun and fresh air.

About sensitivity to chicken or any other food products, if your doctor has determined that you're allergic I would respect that. I don't think, however, that a chicken diet and TB are typically associated.
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replied March 25th, 2012
Thank you for the quick reply. Have you taken any additional medication besides the medicine for the treatment of TB for the phlegm(clearing of throat)? Its really irritating when working in the office and i always clear my throat.
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replied March 28th, 2012
Experienced User
No, I haven't. A month ago I took antibiotics for something else (sinusitis) which I thought might eliminate the occasional phlegm production but it hasn't. Even as I type this reply, I'm also clearing my throat.

In two months, it will be 3 years since I ended my TB treatment (ended May 2009). From May 2009 to the present, the TB symptoms have gradually diminished but at the 3rd year mark, the very slight phlegm production is still there.

I guess that will eventually go away 100% but for now the 99% recovery feels great!

Let me put it this way, after some time there will be days of 100% no TB symptoms and there will be days of 1% (more or less) a TB symptom like some phlegm clearing and/or slight fever.

To me it simply means that my physical constitution was so severely damaged by the TB that it's taking this long to fully recuperate. Again, I'm totally free of the TB bacteria but my body is still repairing itself. The post-treatment symptoms are indicative of the damaged tissues being repaired.

Meantime, what can we do, right?

I say, continue on with a healthy lifestyle and basically just try to enjoy life with the symptoms. The symptoms have become our life's imperfections in exchange for survival.
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replied March 28th, 2012
Have you tried consulting a doctor about the situation if it's normal? considering that it's 3 years now since you have completed the medication but there is still unusual phlegm on your throat.
Sorry for having lots of questions and thanks a lot!
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replied March 29th, 2012
Experienced User
No, I haven't.

I'll be getting a full physical exam shortly and will ask him. But it seems that not much is documented about post-treatment TB experiences, so I'm not expecting a definitive answer.

I did read very old (1960s) research about post-therapy occurrences of "bronchiectasis," where people were still found positive for the TB bacteria and had blood in their sputum. Surgical procedures were performed on those patients.

I think treatment procedures have come a long way since then, particularly where TB patients aren't released from treatment until smears and x-rays show that the TB bacteria has been eradicated.

Any event, good of you to bring this up so I can ask my doctor. I'll be reporting here what he says.
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replied March 29th, 2012
that would be great. hope you have a complete recovery!
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replied March 29th, 2012
Experienced User
OK, thanks.
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replied April 27th, 2012
Hi TBFree, thank you for posting your recovery process, as I am also about 3 years into recovery and have the exact same symptoms as you, so your post provided me a lot of comfort.

I also still have phlegm and for awhile, had a lot of anxiety over feeling sick all of the time because I was 100% healthy before contracting TB. I also was having low grade fevers for awhile, but those have subsided. I do have a compromised immune system and seem to easily pick up a cold, so I do try to as you said, eat healthy, sleep lots, exercise and I take lots of vitamins!

I would say that I am about 90% healthy....my energy levels are still not what they used to be, but they are getting there, and I just keep telling myself to be patient!

Thanks again TBFree for your post. Honestly, I occasionally look for information online about TB recovery and I can never find anything, but found your post and instantly felt better Smile

All the best to you in your continual recovery and to those out there who are in the beginning stages of recovery, no worries, you will get there! The best advice I ever received was to listen to my body.....if you need to rest, rest! Don't push it!

Cheers.
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replied April 27th, 2012
Experienced User
Hello NoMoreTB,

Glad to know you felt better after reading my post/s. Always good to be able to compare notes, and as you said, more so if the symptoms prove to be similar.

I'm now on my 3rd year after ending treatment (or almost 4 years after I first felt sick) and happily the symptoms are 99% gone. I feel as good now as I did before getting sick.

"...if you need to rest, rest! Don't push it!" That's great advice!

Wishing you and the others on the forum complete recovery in the near future as well...
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replied May 20th, 2012
Of all the resources on this topic, I have found your post to be the most informative, hopeful, and comforting. I am 54 years old and am 2 weeks into the standard 6 awaiting the final results of my bronchoscopy cultures. I am not allowed to leave my home without a mask during this period. I had a positive TB blood test after having a productive cough for 6 months which was not effected by treatment with antibiotics. I have also had the pseudo fever off and on and have been uncharacteristically tired. I thank you for taking the time to share your experience with others like me who are searching for information. While I wait to learn whether I have active or latent TB, I am encouraged by your post and by the fact that you are now TBfree. I wish continued good health to you and all survivors of this disease. I wish good luck to all those in various stages of discovery and treatment. God bless.
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replied May 22nd, 2012
Experienced User
Hi TBGirl,

Looks like you're taking the same path I did, particularly in having a bronchoscopy. That procedure apparently removed any remaining doubt about what I had (a lung ailment can be called a "non-specific pulmonary" condition or something like that).

The really good news is that you're taking the first of many but sure steps to getting well. It's quite a journey, but one where many points of enlightenment can be had. The TB experience can turn a person's life around for the better per my experience.

Sharing my story is the least I can do for others similarly affected. In most cases, the absence of information and the "you're not alone" assurance can be very difficult.

Thank you for your well-wishes. Have faith that you'll be back to normal in due time and try to gain some positives from the road back to recovery.

TBFree
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replied February 4th, 2013
Phlegm
hello
thanks from you on this post.
I have TB and I have one question:
as you know we must every two months have get Phlegm test.
I have one problem and I have not any Phlegm and so I want go to hospital to get the Phlegm with device.
So I must know do you know any Drug or fruit to can mage some Phlegm?
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replied February 4th, 2013
Experienced User
Hi Medhi4467,

I did a quick research on your question and found out that in some TB cases there is no phlegm production.

The 2 sources I found were the American Family Physician and Irish Lung Foundation (I believe the forum disallows links, so please search the web with keywords "TB Irish Lung Foundation," etc.).

Knowing that, I don't think it's recommended that you induce phlegm as this might cause further injury to your lungs.

There are other ways to confirm TB from tissue samples, like a bronchoscopy (w/c I had). Your doctor knows best how to approach your case. Doctors will make sure of the diagnosis through extensive tests so they prescribe the right treatment the first time.

My guess is that if a bronchoscopy isn't possible, your doctor will combine all symptoms (afternoon fever, weight loss, dry cough) with say a skin test to confirm your condition.

Let us know what you think.

TBFree
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replied April 7th, 2013
TB recovery - patience, courage and lower expectations!
Hi there
I wanted to thank you for posting this report. Your story sounds almost identical to mine. Same waiting period on antibiotics before I finally had a bronchoscopy and xray that showed the tb.
I was diagnonsed in Australia 2 years ago (at age 27) after an overseas trip, and finished treatment 1.5 years ago. I still have really reduced energy levels and get quite knocked around by colds. Its really difficult to explain to people that you cant do things like you used to and even people close to me I think forget, or dont realise how long the healing takes. It takes a lot of courage and patience with yourself I think to stay positive and try not to expect everything to go back to normal. I have been quite self critical lately as I haven't worked for 12 months and have started to think maybe I've become lazy over this time, like its not TB healing anymore that is making me tired, but just getting used to not doing as much. But its definitely a physical thing. Even typing this right now, I just want to sleep. I sleep 10 hours a night and could nap another 2-4 hours during the day if I could.
I'd like to hear your thoughts about how you found a balance in your work, ie. are you working full time now? I'm really worried about going back full time, and not knowing where my limits are. Also your thoughts about staying positive, and how to explain it to friends, would be really helpful.
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replied April 9th, 2013
Experienced User
Hi Littlemay,

I believe TB affects people quite similarly but at different intensities depending on genetics, state of health prior to infection, and a social support system (or lack of it).

That you feel sleep-deprived most of the time, in my opinion, suggests that your body is still in recuperation phase. But I think you shouldn't rule out other causes of sleepiness which may have been triggered by the TB episode, or possibly coincidental to it.

Coincidental causes of sleepiness are anemia (may be indirectly caused by the TB), fibromyalgia, diabetes, etc.

I'd recommend seeing your doctor to have an opinion.

About my personal situation, yes I'm back working full time and doing all the physical activities (more, it seems) before getting sick.

Having a positive mental attitude comes, I believe, from knowing and understanding combined with just a simple determination to make it.

What helped me a lot was researching the web about my condition to a point where I probably knew more about TB than 95% of the people around me.

Knowing from research that I could survive gave me confidence and the willingness to do what's needed to recover.

The attitude of "I'm going to overcome this," the knowledge and understanding of TB, and a recovery program - all of those are important.

Lastly, I say ignore labels, by you or other people, of being "lazy." Your're taking care of your body by sleeping more.

And if you're depending on those people for your daily needs, showing them this forum will probably help.

Hope this helps. You'll get better - just have a little patience and work on getting proper nutrition in addition to the rest and sleep you're currently getting.

TBFree

PS Would recommend seeing a doctor for other possible causes of the sleepiness.
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replied April 11th, 2013
Experienced User
I left out comments about sleepiness during my TB recovery period. I didn't have that feeling during or after treatment. But what I recall is that before treatment, I thought I could get better by sleeping more, which I did (had to force it).

As I mentioned earlier, I believe TB survivors may react differently to the disease. Your particular reaction in my opinion is perfectly understandable, especially if treatment came a bit later and TB caused more damage to your system. In that situation, anyone would involuntarily rest and sleep more.

It's also important to acknowledge the psychological effect of people in one's immediate circle not understanding the magnitude of the condition and therefore having unrealistic expectations of the survivor. This is probably your case, yes?

I think the solution is to educate them. You might have to be completely open about your condition (if you're not already) - tell them it's a slow but fatal condition that's only being reversed by treatment, and the road to recovery is just as slow. Provide reading materials, show them this forum. Don't fault them, as they don't know (for an outsider who's healthy, it's easy to project their own strength on others. But that's pretty normal).

PM me if you wish to share more (although doing it here probably benefits others). I'll be glad to continue our conversation.
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replied May 19th, 2013
Complicated TB
TBFree,

Thanks for sharing your story with us! I felt immediately better after reading it. I guess I could share my story here as well...

I'm a 25 year old male expat living in third world country (increased chance to get TB).

I got TB infection about 4-5 months ago and started non-stop medication only about one month ago. It took long time to find out what I actually had. I did bronchoscopy with biopsy and transthoraic needle biopsy with both came back indecisive. CT-scan and x-ray showed mass on my left upper lobe (about 3x3x3cm) and numerous minor nodules in the same area. About 3 months ago I started TB medication (4 standard drugs: isoniazid, ethambutol, rifampicin and pyrazinamide) because we ran out of good ideas. After eating the drugs for about 10 days I got severe drug induced hepatitis, was admitted in hospital and stopped TB medication. During my time in hospital getting my liver fixed we found positive pneumonia (bacterial growth on sputum sample) on my lungs and doctor thought I probably never had TB to begin with. I got moxifloxacin for pneumonia (since that was used when i was in critical condition with my liver to reduce fever) and it seemed to work. I continued eating moxifloxacin for about 3 weeks and I was starting to feel pretty good.

After not eating any medicine for a few weeks I suddenly started to feel weak again (with weird sounds coming from my lungs when breathing). I went to hospital where I was told bacterial results from bronchosopy just grew TB bacteria and now we finally knew I actually got TB. After waiting for about two weeks (thanks to public holidays) I got the resitivity results back: the bacteria is vulnerable to all the first-class drugs, great! After that I started gradual medication where we started with single drug with small dosage and gradually increased dosage and added other drugs. This way we figured out what was the drug that caused me problems. It turned out that the problematic drug was pyrazinamide. Now I have been eating three TB drugs (rifampicin, isoniazid and ethambutol) every day for about 3 weeks and feeling quite ok.

Since I started to feel better (no symptoms whatsoever) I decided to try to get back to my standard excercise routine, starting from swimming about 30 minutes per day. After a few days of doing this I started to feel sharp pain on my esophagus (something I never experienced before) while swimming and had to stop. This happened a couple of days ago and ever since I've been feeling like I have some weights on my chest as breathing is a bit heavy. Also I feel like I have a constant lump in my throat. I haven't been doing any excercises after that swimming incident. Did you ever have problems when trying to excercise while recovering from TB? How long did you wait before considering to continue excercising?

According to a couple of articles I've read from online excercise should be beneficial for TB but my experience tells me otherwise so far. Also some articles warned that excercising vigorously while lungs are still recovering from the disease can cause more damage to lungs.

About my symptoms:
==================
Beginning (before medication):
-Heavy to breathe

Progressing (just about to start TB medication):
-Heavy to breathe, daily activities very limited due to lack of energy
-Cannot breathe cold air, irritates lungs
-Chest pain
-Lump in the throat feeling

TB medication started, developing hepatitis:
-Stinging pain in abdomen
-Some weird nervous hallucinations all the time (these feelings are hard to describe, definitely not normal)
-Finally felt very bad nausea before admitting to hospital

While having hepatitis in hospital:
-Constant palpitations (not visible in EKG, probably "nervous hallucinations")
-Nausea
-High fever
-Abdominal pain and discomfort

After eating moxifloxacin (only) for about 3 weeks I felt almost 100% healthy, was doing regular excercise etc...

TB strikes back:
-Noise while breathing
-Heavy to breathe
-Lack of energy, limited daily activity

After eating 3 TB drugs for ~3 weeks (felt about 100% normal) started to do some excercises and from those I got some symptoms back:
-Heavy to breathe
-Lump in the throat feeling
-Minor pain in chest sometimes
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replied May 20th, 2013
Question regarding TB
Hi there TBFree and others,

Is there still anyone to answer???
Please reply so that i can ask my question.
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replied May 20th, 2013
Experienced User
Hello TBfighter,

I'll reply within the next 12 hours, after taking care of some business.

Thanks,
TBFree
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replied May 20th, 2013
Experienced User
Hey TBfighter,

Your case evidently involved some twists and turns before it became confirmed TB.

You mentioned a period of feeling OK after the initial dose of TB medication then felt pain and general weakness.

Best as I can recall, I also had a few "good" days but really more of the bad ones (malaise, weakness, fever, etc.).

It looks like you've settled down to a "classic TB" condition that involves chest pain, etc.

As to exercise, I basically took the cues from my own body. And the cues, or signals, were very clear. At the height of TB infection, when the bacteria was destroying body cells, just the thought of exercising was repulsive - I had zero appetite for physical activity.

I recall that around the 5th month of treatment (totaling 6 months), I felt 75% capable of exercise. So, with still a bit of the TB symptoms (wheezing and "sticky throat" mostly), I'd go out and run/walk/run.

When you reach that stage where your body is saying "looks like I can swim for 10 minutes," then go ahead and do it.

The good thing about exercising while recovering is - at least in my case - the TB symptoms go away during the exercise.

I also read about the sun providing recuperative effects (through vitamin D synthesis), particularly in increasing immunity and bone strength. Since you like swimming, you'll maximize benefits in an open pool.

By way of recapping, I'll say this about exercising during TB recuperation: 1) The body will provide clear signals if you can exercise, and 2) sun exposure while exercising is beneficial.

Hope this helps.

TBFree
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replied May 21st, 2013
Hi TBFree,

Actually you are replying to the wrong person Smile
Thanks for you answer!

I think I should take it easy for now. Even though I felt like doing some sports it was clearly a wrong thing to do. Now after the pain I felt in the swimming pool (open air pool btw, which is good) I've been feeling crappy every day with constant minor pain. Also breathing has been a bit heavy. If these symptoms will not go over in a week or so perhaps I'll need to call my doctor.
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replied May 21st, 2013
Experienced User
Yeah, I thought you were the same person wanting a Fedex delivery of my response.

Looks like your willpower to exercise is pretty strong; I didn't have that until I was almost at the end of my treatment.

The minor pain, labored breathing, malaise ("crappy" feeling), and - I've not mentioned it before - that sensation of slight nausea, are all part of TB before, during, and up to 3-4 years after treatment. It just diminished, though very slowly, post-treatment.

I think it's the snail's pace of recovery that makes people wonder if they're getting better at all.

Well, after a full 5 years from when the first TB symptoms do I now just feel 100% normal again.

The feeling of well-being really becomes obvious only on the 3.5 or 4th year mark.

Long road ahead, but given our remaining life expectancy as TB survivors, the recovery period is comparatively short.

You'll get there. Just take it easy as you said, be strict with your meds, and live healthy.

TBFree
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replied June 14th, 2013
hello TB free

i was on tb treatment 6 months ago.i was diagnosed with tb in 20011 november.i started to take medicines. i improved very quickly..i took all the doses.Didn't miss any dose..but after 5 months(2 months before the end of treatment),a follow up sputam test showed that the infection was not cured.so,i was shifted to category 2 regimen of tb treatment( streptomycin,rifanpicin,isoniazid,pyrizina mide,ethambutol).but during this phase,i started to develop somethiong unique.that is,after few days,like after evry 5 or 10 or 15 days i was having sweating,sweating which lasted till 10 hours-12 hours a day..it was not fever,because,i have taken temperature reading.my body temperature was normal.but the temperature of palms and foot were high..i completed my treatment on 31st december,2011 and my tests showed that i was completely cured.but till now,i feel those same thing..after evry 5 or 10 days,that sweating,that little increase in temperature in palm and foot,and a little kind of irritation in chest..did you feel the same????
other than that,sometimes i feel like that there is something in my throat.And i dont feel week.even i'm gaining wait.and as i am a student of martial arts,so i spend some time practicing.I didn't encounter any problem while practicing or excercising.But i seriously don't know why the temperature increases in my palms and feet..i asked a doctor friend,and he said that it was nothing serious and it has nothing to do with post tb symptoms..
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replied June 14th, 2013
hello TB free

i was on tb treatment 6 months ago.i was diagnosed with tb in 20011 november.i started to take medicines. i improved very quickly..i took all the doses.Didn't miss any dose..but after 5 months(2 months before the end of treatment),a follow up sputam test showed that the infection was not cured.so,i was shifted to category 2 regimen of tb treatment( streptomycin,rifanpicin,isoniazid,pyrizina mide,ethambutol).but during this phase,i started to develop somethiong unique.that is,after few days,like after evry 5 or 10 or 15 days i was having sweating,sweating which lasted till 10 hours-12 hours a day..it was not fever,because,i have taken temperature reading.my body temperature was normal.but the temperature of palms and foot were high..i completed my treatment on 31st december,2011 and my tests showed that i was completely cured.but till now,i feel those same thing..after evry 5 or 10 days,that sweating,that little increase in temperature in palm and foot,and a little kind of irritation in chest..did you feel the same????
other than that,sometimes i feel like that there is something in my throat.And i dont feel week.even i'm gaining wait.and as i am a student of martial arts,so i spend some time practicing.I didn't encounter any problem while practicing or excercising.But i seriously don't know why the temperature increases in my palms and feet..i asked a doctor friend,and he said that it was nothing serious and it has nothing to do with post tb symptoms..
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replied June 14th, 2013
Experienced User
Looks like you had a more advanced case of TB, considering that you went into "category 2" treatment.

That being the case, your post-TB symptoms are more intense than mine. But we have similarities: the chest irritation and the sensation of "something in the throat."

As I had the "personal TB experience" like many of us, I can say this with a good amount of certainty: the physical symptoms we feel before, during, and after medication are the effects of the TB bacteria.

The easiest analogy is this: TB bacteria is like a piece of coal that burns the skin. Remove the coal, and we can still feel the pain of the burnt skin. To feel normal again, the injured skin has to heal and, like TB, it takes time.

You say that you don't have traces of the TB bacteria, and that's true because medication has killed it.

What you're experiencing now are the effects of the tissue damage caused by the bacteria.

In my case, I experienced those effects for about 4 and a half years.

In your case, it will probably be a bit longer but, like me, you'll be back to normal after your tissues have healed.

By the way, about not having the symptoms during your martial arts activity, it was the same for me while engaging in a sport.
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replied June 14th, 2013
Experienced User
Looks like you had a more advanced case of TB, considering that you went into "category 2" treatment.

That being the case, your post-TB symptoms are more intense than mine. But we have similarities: the chest irritation and the sensation of "something in the throat."

As I had the "personal TB experience" like many of us, I can say this with a good amount of certainty: the physical symptoms we feel before, during, and after medication are the effects of the TB bacteria.

The easiest analogy is this: TB bacteria is like a piece of coal that burns the skin. Remove the coal, and we can still feel the pain of the burnt skin. To feel normal again, the injured skin has to heal and, like TB, it takes time.

You say that you don't have traces of the TB bacteria, and that's true because medication has killed it.

What you're experiencing now are the effects of the tissue damage caused by the bacteria.

In my case, I experienced those effects for about 4 and a half years.

In your case, it will probably be a bit longer but, like me, you'll be back to normal after your tissues have healed.

By the way, about not having the symptoms during your martial arts activity, it was the same for me while engaging in a sport.
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replied June 14th, 2013
there was a typing error in the previous message..i completed my treatment on 31st december 2012,not in 2011(as mentioned in previous message)
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replied June 15th, 2013
TBfree

thanx for your quick reply.. Smile it was really helpfull..sometimes i even think about creating a tb forum where people with tuberculosis can get mental support and share their personal experiences...thanx anyway..
and by the way,did you also suffer from that typical sweating and 'burning sensation' that is,increase in temeperature in hand and feet?
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replied June 15th, 2013
TBfree

Are you from india? actually i would like to know if you were on the DOT(Direct observation treatment) program..Thats why i'm asking this..
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replied June 15th, 2013
Experienced User
TBcured, I live in the US. Re your question about the sweating and the high temperature, no, I didn't have those.

We have a system here that might be similar to your DOT. When I was taking medication, I was reporting daily to the Dept. of Health to take it. A nurse was dedicated to my case so she could closely watch my progress.

I believe you'll recover full health; just be careful to get adequate rest and nutrition, and, obviously, avoid occasions of re-infection. Last but not least, have faith that you'll be back to normal in a few years as you continue to heal your body.

PM me anytime...

TBFree
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replied June 15th, 2013
Experienced User
TBcured, I live in the US. Re your question about the sweating and the high temperature, no, I didn't have those.

We have a system here that might be similar to your DOT. When I was taking medication, I was reporting daily to the Dept. of Health to take it. A nurse was dedicated to my case so she could closely watch my progress.

I believe you'll recover full health; just be careful to get adequate rest and nutrition, and, obviously, avoid occasions of re-infection. Last but not least, have faith that you'll be back to normal in a few years as you continue to heal your body.

PM me anytime...

TBFree
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replied June 19th, 2013
Gastrointestinal problems
TBFree,

I've recovered from the swimming incident. Doctor said it was a pulmonary edema caused by breathing in chlorine gas from the surface of the swimming pool. Quite possibly the person who is maintaining the pool didn't know how to do it properly. I have developed other symptoms now. I feel constant stinging pain on my abdomen for a week or two. Two days ago I thought I had heart attack and almost called ambulance. I got a very heavy feeling on middle of my chest and I wasn't able to stretch my chest (not even stand straight for a 10-15 minutes). Doctor told me my heart is fine but I have some spasms on my stomach. I've been eating buscopan now for a few days without help.

Did you ever have problems with your stomach or gastrointestinal system while taking the medicine?
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