Hey Guys,

I just had my most painful and prolonged gout attack since my diagnosis in 2005. I was able to prevent any flare up for 2 years by taking JYY2's advice of using Baking Soda. Thanks JYY2. I was able to do this without any medication.

About 4 months ago I thought I cured my gout and got complacent and stopped the BSoda intake. Then I had an attack 2 months ago. Took Colchicine & BSoda combo and it receded briefly.

My current attack has lasted 3 weeks already (1st week most painful). It's receding very slowly this time and I'm consuming BSoda with drinking water throughout the day for the past week.

I have done some research on this and found quercetin to be statisically significant in reducing uric acid with bromelain helping the absorpbtion of quercetin. I am not certain if this translates into practical significance as I do not have the medical knowledge or the experience like some of you on this board.

Do any of you guys take any supplements i.e. berry capsules, quercetin alongside BSoda? I also just read a post about Famotidine being effective in the prevention of gout. Any comments very much appreciated.
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replied June 17th, 2008
Experienced User
Everything that I tried to palliate my gout, either prescription or supplement, gradually diminished in effectiveness over time. The thing that cured my gout 5 years ago was the resolution of my sleep apnea.
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replied June 18th, 2008
I know what you mean. I'm still hopping around with crutches. BSoda is working but I do find it less effective than before. That's why I want to experiment with other supplements in combination.

I have taken BSoda continuously for 1 month and replacing that with Black Cherry concentrate juice today. Looking at bilberry extract as well.

There must be things to take to prevent Gout other than medications.
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replied June 19th, 2008
Experienced User
Since the time of the ancient Egyptians, humans have been seeking, but never finding, the magic elixir to overcome the excruciating pain of gout. Sleep apnea was recognized as a serious medical condition only 60 years ago. Since then, study after study has shown how very common it is, how many life-threatening consequences result from it, and how woefully underdiagnosed it is. Twenty years ago, medical journal articles began reporting how the depletion of oxygen in the blood leads to the generation of excess uric acid plus increased blood acidity which increases its propensity to precipitate out uric acid in the form of the crystals of monosodium urate that cause a gout attack. The medical profession hasn't yet figured out that sleep apnea is a direct cause of many gout attacks. I guess in another 20 years, it will be common knowledge. Are you willing to wait that long?

The cure for gout lies not in how we eat, but how we sleep.
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replied June 19th, 2008
sleep apnea
Painfree,

I just checked your website and it makes sense to me. Sorry didn't catch your hint earlier.

I'm told I'm a very bad snorer all the time but I never gave it 2nd thoughts.

Does sleeping on my front side make any difference in comparison to sleeping side ways? Its sounds strange, but I've also been told that I automatically elevate my head with my arms whilst I sleep in this position.

I will see my doctor about getting tested for sleep apnea as soon as possible.

By the way, I am a Thalassemia Trait carrier, which means I suffer a mild deficiency in Hemoglobin to carry oxygen around my body. This may also explain why I could be more prone to Gout according to your research.

Thanks again. Will let you know about the result when I get the test done.
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replied June 19th, 2008
Experienced User
I don't know whether it's advisable to sleep on your stomach. Side sleeping works for me and others that I have seen described in medical journal articles.

It's good to hear that you will be screened for sleep apnea. Your significant snoring sure is an indicator, but nonsnorers can also have sleep apnea. If you need to convince your doctor about the connection of oxygen depletion with gout, you can download the list of medical journal articles from my website to take with you to give to him or her.
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replied June 23rd, 2008
I have been referred to see a specialist in 8 weeks time (waiting list in UK).
I'll try the softball technique in the meantime. Thanks for the info- very much appreciated.
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replied June 24th, 2008
Experienced User
What you call a softball in the UK may be very different from our terminology here in the US. The ball that I used is the size of a US softball (bigger than a baseball) but was very incompressible. It has to be large and hard to make sure it creates enough discomfort to awaken you if you ever roll over onto it during your sleep.

Good luck with your sleep test. Just remember how important it is to follow whatever regimen is recommended to you as a result of it. Gout is just the tip of the iceberg of medical problems that can develop from sleep apnea. Most of the others are much more serious, even life-threatening.
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replied July 14th, 2008
Sleep Apnea
I was diagnosed for sleep apnea three years ago. This was a year after my first gout attack. I have used CPAP sleeping machine ever since. I use it regulary every night. The machine prevents sleep apnea by applying air pressure to airways. The bad news is that I still get gout attacks. So, there is obviously more to gout than sleep apnea...
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replied July 14th, 2008
Experienced User
Sorry to hear that your gout attacks are continuing. You're the first one that I have heard report that. I hope that the pressure setting on your machine is adequate for your needs.
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replied August 21st, 2008
Sleep Study Result
Hi Painfree,

Just had my results back from the hospital with the analysis of my sleep study.

Basically, I'm perfectly normal according to the results.

O2 saturation = 97%
no. of awakenings = 54
snore episodic (% sleep time) = 0.1


The test result was based on 1 night of study and at that time I was already taking your advice of using props to sleep side ways. 97% of the time of study, my body position was side ways. I am not surprised by this as I had several solid hockey balls on my back to wake me up if I didn't.

I haven't had an attack for about 90 days and I continue to sleep side ways.

I should be very glad that I'm proven negative. However, I feel the study was not extensive enough and that had I slept without hockey balls tied to my back and awakened many times, the results might have been different. They cannot extend the study due to resource limitation.

I am now discharged as a normal sleeper with minimal snoring!

I just hope this will be the end of gout attacks from sleeping side ways. Thanks Painfree, I fully appreciate your advice.
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replied August 28th, 2008
Experienced User
Hi Twentyfive,

So glad to hear that you probably have no sleep apnea and have had no gout attacks for 90 days since you found a way to prevent sleep apnea by avoiding sleeping on your back. If your gout attacks used to occur more frequently than every 90 days, then it is a truly notable achievement. Keep up the good work!
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replied September 9th, 2008
Some good natural remedies for gout are black cherry juice and Devils Claw. Both work to dissolve the uric acid crystals. Feel better soon!
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User Profile
replied November 30th, 2008
Community Volunteer
Tart Cherries
If you choose Cherries to help with gout it should always be Tart Cherries, it is the strongest and works the best on Gout and arthritis type pain. Also Tart Cherries helps with sleep. Google it and you will see.

Choose Softchews and not powdered form...

~Zig
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