User Profile
On the 15th august I decided to do a jump on my snowboard landed then i had cray sensation of a dead leg got about 2 meters and collapsed pain became agony. Went through all the stress of waiting for paramedics and they had to take my boot off... long story short went to hospital told i had a sprain.
Got a phone call on the friday to say come in its broken we need to cast it. Then the following friday went to see the orthopedic doctor then next Wednesday i was in theater 5 pins in my foot the bone was also dislocated from the tibia/fibia 6 weeks down still no wait bearing had pins removed last week and yesterday i was put in a moon boot brilliant... the wounds are still bleeding so im not aloud to bath my leg still and i start physio on thursday...only aloud to put 5/10kilos of pressure on it and the boot can come off when im around the house. I have to go to christchurch for an mri scan as he is still worried about the condition of the bone... whether it may die or not... What are the chances... and how do i start my own exercises i've but the boot back on today as it feels very odd.. just to give my foot some structure... How often shall i do my own physio why am i only aloud 5/10kilos of weight?
Did you find this post helpful?
|

User Profile
replied October 15th, 2012
Especially eHealthy
Jessicajane22,

Sorry about your injury.

Talus fractures are very difficult to treat, not only because of their location, but because of their blood supply. A large portion of the talus is covered by articular cartilage, where it articulates with the other bones of the hindfoot. It is considered the lynch-pin of the hindfoot, as every bone in the hindfoot and ankle touches it.

This is why it is very important to reduce any displacement in the bone when it is fractured. Depending upon where the fractures are located will usually determine if it will undergo avascular necrosis (AVN). Fractures across the neck of the talus tend to lose the blood supply. Fracture of the talar dome can also undergo AVN. Fractures of the articular facets of the talus tend to go on to traumatic arthritis.

But, even if a talus does develop AVN, that does not mean that it is destined to collapse. Some do, but a portion of the taluses that do develop AVN actually undergo revascularization. The important thing is to protect the bone from collapsing, if it does develop AVN, to give it the chance at revascularization. Which is why there are usually pretty strict limits on weight bearing in these injuries.


As to activities that are usually recommended at this stage, they are usually limited to range of motion of the ankle and foot.

Unfortunately, you still have open wounds. But, once your wounds are cleared up, you might look into getting into a pool for some therapy. The warmth of the water makes the tissues more pliable. The buoyancy makes activities none weight bearing (in chest deep water). And, in some pools, they have weighted vests that can be used to “run” in the deep end. Many athletes do this to stay in shape when they have lower extremity injuries.


But, again, talar fractures are very significant injuries. Follow your surgeon’s instructions on what you are allowed to do, and limit your weight bearing. Work on range of motion of the ankle, foot, and toes. Keep the foot elevated to reduce swelling. Do not smoke, as this can significantly hamper bone healing. Eat a proper diet, with extra protein, calcium, vitamin D, and magnesium.

Good luck. (Where were you snow boarding in August?)
|
Did you find this post helpful?

User Profile
replied October 15th, 2012
Thank you for your reply.
So do you recommend that i keep the boot off when im around the house? I only got my cast off yesterday so it feels very odd...Can't quit explain it.
My toes are always cold now too.

Looking forward to going swimming as this will be were i can really excel myself since i love the water.

I'm in new zealand i ended up missing the last two month of the ski season too. Not Happy!
|
Did you find this post helpful?

User Profile
replied October 15th, 2012
Especially eHealthy
Jessicajane22,

If you feel more comfortable with the boot on, that is fine. Just be sure to remove it several times a day to work on range of motion. Be careful of the weight bearing, that has to be avoided till the fracture is healed.

But, since the talus is basically covered with articular cartilage, motion is started as early as possible, for the health of the cartilage. About the only way for the articular (hyaline) cartilage to be nourished is through the synovial fluid (joint fluid). The only way for the fluid to be moved around the joint is through range of motion.

Motion also helps reduce the chances of stiffness developing.

The coolness in the toes/foot is basically because of a couple of things. One is that you are not using the muscles on the leg normally. The venous blood and lymphatic fluid is pumped back to the body by the contraction of the muscles in the leg. So, when the muscles are not being used, the circulation does not work as well. Also, the veins and lymph channels have been disrupted due to the injury and surgery. These have to reconstitute themselves, make new ones through and across the site of injury. This too causes problems with the circulation.

Thus range of motion is good for several reasons.

But, if you are more comfortable in your boot, that’s fine. As long as you maintain the motion. You can gradually wean yourself out of the boot as time goes by.

Work on the wounds also. It sounds like you would do well in pool therapy. In some pools, they have a weighted vest which patients can use to "run" in the deep end of the pool. Many athletes use this technique to stay in shape when they have a lower extremity injury. Of course, you can also swim.


Again, talus fractures can be very significant injuries. Be sure to follow your surgeon’s instruction closely. Good luck.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied January 10th, 2013
sorry for your injury

I too borke my talus and calcanis i broke mine if february and have had 2 surgerys and now in a external halo with 12 pins going all the way thrue my bones holding the 4 halos please be carfull about walking so that it heals right
|
Did you find this post helpful?

User Profile
replied January 11th, 2013
Especially eHealthy
John,

In your other posting, you state that you had the ring fixator (Ilizarov fixator) place just two months ago. But, then you also state that you sustained the injury in February. So, something is amiss. Did you actually sustain your injury almost a year ago (as February is next month), and then just had the fixator placed a couple of months ago when it did not heal? Or, are you mis-stating which month you actually sustained your injury in?

Anyways, hope you heal your injury well. Good luck.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied January 11th, 2013
I did injure my foot in february and did not have my first surgery till may becouse of the swelling the first one did not heal and now i have had my second surgery the end of october with the external device hope this answers some of your questions thanks
|
Did you find this post helpful?

User Profile
replied January 11th, 2013
Especially eHealthy
John,

That makes a lot more sense. Thank you for clearing things up.

Sounds like you have had a long and rocky course. And, you still have a long ways to go.

Wishing you the best.

Good luck.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied June 14th, 2013
Shattered Talus 4 months ago
hey im 17 years old and I shattered my talus bone 4 months ago doing a motocross jump and have 8 pins and an 2 plates holding it together now. im allowed to start weight bearing and am now beginning to walk with a bit of a limp and in a bit of pain. the bone does have AVN an i wanted to see how your dealing with your injury now and the chances of the talus revascularizing.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

User Profile
replied April 17th, 2015
Hi, i am 31 and i badly injured falling from my balcony at 10m height...fractured by talus neck and dislocated.

Immediately rushed to the hospital, ortho advised for the X-ray and informed about the fracture of my talus bone and complication of its recovery. And advised for ORIF within 24hrs as this is the golden time not to be missed,

As planned, ORIF is successfully done and the fracture positioned with two screws and discharged from hospital after 5 days with hard cast/foot elevated/nil weight bearing for 4 weeks. + providedwith lot of supplements and pain killers/antibiotic...

Next review with Ortho after 4 weeks..reviwed with X-ray and ortho informed me that fractured joint in in good condition and healing is started as expected...cast removed and instructed to start physio with NWB and all pain killers antibiotics were stopped.

Now during physio, i could move my ankle only 20-30% in up/down and no movement in other direction...physio giving hope of returning to normal movement with in 2 weeks.

After going through many stories in various forum, i have series concern of below....as I could not predict my stage of the healing...

1. After 4 weeks, doctor informed me that bone is started healing, Is still there is possibilities of AVN??

2. Can I get the complete movement of my ankle..

3. When i was walking with forearm crutch, I accidentally hit my injured toe on floor which led to big pain inside my ankle and went off in 10 min... will this type of accident lead to delay the healing process??

4. After ORIF, doctor informed me that there are few small piece around the fracture and there may be possibilities for arthritis... when can i confirm that I am out of danger from arthritis.

thanks for your answer.
|
Did you find this post helpful?