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Q on PTSD & psychological affects of house fire

Hi,
First time posting here. Not sure its just PTSD, but here's the situation. Our family suffered a house fire in October. Thank goodness we all got out ok. Unfortunately, we were evacuated, displaced, relocated twice, and finally settled into temporary housing.
My son, literally lost all or most of his electronics, and has been seemingly withdrawn and depressed, no desire or motivation, and barely making it to school.
Of course, we salvaged some of his stuff/restored, and even bought him a few new consoles. He is 15.
The other day, in school, he pulled the fire alarm, and the whole school evacuated. He was given a suspension, and when asked why he did it, he had no answer.
He will have a hearing, and I've been thinking - is it possible that the trauma and loss and stress of the fire and the after effects, could have had some motivating factor in pulling the alarm? He also said he's afraid to ever go back to his room, even after its all reconstructed. Thanks!
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First Helper How2life
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replied January 5th, 2018
I was in a house fire too. November 2017. I am 70 years old and recognize this as PTSD.
It is very much like what I experienced some years ago after a hospital made an error and I overdosed (at home). VERY traumatic event. This recent house fire has me in the same state of fear and uncertainty as that prior event did. I understand why your son pulled the fire alarm. I have this urge to build a large bonfire and then...fight it. It's "crazy"... but that's a real urge. I need to do SOMETHING. But I won't. Not at this time, because I'm a rational, wise old woman. Your son is young, just a boy. This fire has overwhelmed him, just as it did me. Actually, our claims adjuster instructed me to get therapy. I had NOT mentioned that I was in any way upset. She told me to sit still and listen to what she had to tell me. And then she gave me the low-down on what a house fire does to a human being. We all respond in our own way, but it is TRAUMATIC. I completely understand his fear about entering the house again. A very powerful message was sent to him that his is NOT safe in there. Of course, there is help for me and for him. I'm already set up with my therapist, who specializes in this problem. I hope you can do the same for your son. He needs it, he deserves it, and it will enable him to grow from this traumatic event. Best wishes to you all.
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replied January 5th, 2018
This was a VERY helpful link for me. I urge you to read it to understand what your son (and you) are experiencing. It's an excellent article.



https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/psychology- surviving-fire-having-return-its-normalcy- after-penney
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