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Prolotherapy for ligament laxity

Hi, everyone.

I'd just like to ask if anyone has had prolotherapy for ligament laxity and how it went as I am considering this for my problem of an unstable spine as I have been told not to have a fusion as this will make it worse in the long run.

I also would like to ask if any of you may know if it is available on the NHS?

BTW, I am UK based.
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replied August 20th, 2008
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I'm not sure about NHS coverage of prolotherapy for ligament laxity of the spine. However, you can find a list of prolotherapy practitioners who are members of the British Institute of Musculoskeletal Medicine BIMM
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replied August 21st, 2008
Experienced User
Thanks for your help and advice, rooted. Smile

Thanks also for the link.
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replied August 25th, 2008
Supporter
You're welcome DS. Please let us know if you find a prolotherapy expert and/or how the treatment goes. Good luck!
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replied August 25th, 2008
Experienced User
Thanks for your reply, rooted.

I'll let you know if I find someone and how it goes. Smile

I'm still awaiting to be seen by a consultant at the moment as the one I was originally sent to see by G.Ps choice doesn't want to see me for reasons unknown so I am now going to see a different one as alarm bells rang when I heard he doesn't want to see me as I've read that this is a sign of a not-so-good consultant.

So far I'm still waiting as, for some reason I was told that now my condition is chronic and not acute I have to wait for ages, I don't know why. Sometimes I think so-called health care professionals don't take their patient's conditions seriously at all.

Once I have seen a different consultant and he's told me a bit more about my condition, I'll ask him about prolotherapy as I think it will be particularly suitable for what I've got (as far as my G.P made out that I've got lax ligaments, making my spine unstable, though he isn't a spine specialist so I would certainly appreciate seeing a spine specialist - a good one though, not one that says he doesn't want to see me and not give me a reason why. I think some consultants are awfully rude to their patients and they constantly think they are God! At the end of the day they are only human but, seriously they should start treating their patients with much more respect than they currently do.

Thanks once again, rooted and I'll let you know what happens. Wink
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replied August 25th, 2008
Experienced User
Hi, screaney and thanks for your reply. Smile

My G.P and physiotherapist didn't specify a particular part. I think they meant I had it generally but it could be affecting my spine. I did do some tests like those ones where they look to see how far your finger can bend or similar sorts of tests like that. After I'd done these tests they then came to the conclusion I may have hypermobility syndrome or some sort of syndrome that makes me extra bendy as I did seem more flexible generally, even my hands/fingers. I haven't noticed it affecting any of my other parts as in giving me pain or problems. My hands have long, slender fingers which I think could be a sign of bendyness as apparently tall people are prone to it mainly. My spine seems to be the main part that is affected.

I don't exactly remember doing anything immediatly and feeling the pain but my physiotherapist said that he reckoned it could've been an old injury that has flared up now from 10 years ago when I was a kid and I perhaps did something like falling over. He thinks it is from an impact like falling on my bottom or something. The only thing that I can remember doing is falling out of a hammock onto my bottom from when the hammock broke and fell onto the floor. I don't remember feeling injured or any pain as such then. I just remember getting back up and that's it. Apart from that I can't really remember doing anything as far as I know.

I am UK based and am finding it hard to find many ones with testimonials as there isn't a great lot of them currently around my area. rooted gave me a good link to the BIMM site which I found helpful. I'm in the West Midlands area so a bit rural.

Thanks for sharing your advice and link. Smile
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replied February 19th, 2011
Prolotherapy for back pain
I'm an ex PE teacher, two children (both long and difficult births) with a history of back pain since I was 20.I have a marked 'short hamstring lordosis' and mild scoliosis. I started prolotherapy in the early 1960s when I could hardly walk, was in severe pain for 2 years and had tried physio and osteopathy with minimal effects. I have since had treatments varying between every 6 months to 3 years depending on how I felt and what I was doing.The 'jabs' enabled me to live a reasonable life, realtively pain free, play golf, dance, garden with care - in other words a fairly normal life. I've been living in France for several years - where they don't seem to have heard of prolotherapy - and have just got worse so have now gone back to UK for treatment. It's costly with air fares and hotels but worth every penny. I wouldn't claim its perfect but has allowed me to live an acceptable life. I suffered a crushed L3 last year in a motor accident but am now - with prolotherapy - getting back to walking, housework, and mild gardening. I'll be 80 in May so count myself as a success! My advice is try it - you've nothing to lose and it's money well spent. Originally PPP paid for the jabs but stopped as it isn't considered a 'cure' but I think its the best money I spend.
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replied February 19th, 2011
Prolotherapy for back pain
I'm an ex PE teacher, two children (both long and difficult births) with a history of back pain since I was 20.I have a marked 'short hamstring lordosis' and mild scoliosis. I started prolotherapy in the early 1960s when I could hardly walk, was in severe pain for 2 years and had tried physio and osteopathy with minimal effects. I have since had treatments varying between every 6 months to 3 years depending on how I felt and what I was doing.The 'jabs' enabled me to live a reasonable life, realtively pain free, play golf, dance, garden with care - in other words a fairly normal life. I've been living in France for several years - where they don't seem to have heard of prolotherapy - and have just got worse so have now gone back to UK for treatment. It's costly with air fares and hotels but worth every penny. I wouldn't claim its perfect but has allowed me to live an acceptable life. I suffered a crushed L3 last year in a motor accident but am now - with prolotherapy - getting back to walking, housework, and mild gardening. I'll be 80 in May so count myself as a success! My advice is try it - you've nothing to lose and it's money well spent. Originally PPP paid for the jabs but stopped as it isn't considered a 'cure' but I think its the best money I spend.
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replied May 10th, 2012
Me too!
Hi there,
I've been diagnosed with hypermobility syndrome and all the threads on this post are very familiar to me. I have had to give up my dream job-training guide dogs and am desperately trying to find the right treatment, exercise etc. Have had physio with some success but not great. Am doing pilates which is great as my teacher undestrands the condition. However, it still rules my life and i seem to be on this rollacoaster of one week feeling like I'm really getting somewhere, which in turn lifts my mood a great deal. Then all of a sudden my back or hips start to really hurt for a few weeks and its back to feeling miserable, and quite obssessed with thinking about it non stop. Its so hard as I'm used to being really active-running, my job, triathlons etc. I had an awful time with the NHS getting misdiagnosed over and over, put on treatments, made to feel like a hypercondriact. Went private and got diagnosed quickly (but 6000 later!). I am very interested in prolotherapy too. It sounds (if it works) amazing. Just the thought of doing activities again thrills me. I am seeing a consultant on the NHS finally in a few weeks and will ask him about prolotherapy, and any other treatments. Will add to this post after. Good luck.
Sonia.
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