Medical Questions > Conditions and Diseases > Hypoglycemia Forum

permanent ketosis, unable to eat carbs (Page 1)

Anyone ever experience such a thing?

It's been 4 years since my symptoms initially started where I could not have sugar.

I used to have a reactive response after eating simple sugars such as pancakes and syrup within a few hours, so I adjusted my diet to complex carbs and that worked great initially.

However, slowly over the past 4 years I had to remove most carbohyrates because the reactive response would get progressively worse.

Most recently in the past six months I have not been able to even eat broccoli, peanuts, soy nuts, or anything usually considered to be highly complex.

What happens is I now get an extraordinary adrenaline rush, anixety, panic and lack of mental clarity within 20 minutes. It's as if my body has become accustomed to the intake of carbs and then over reacts quickly.

I've been living off of beef, pork and eggs and it seems to be holding okay even though I still don't feel as good as I did more than 4 years ago. At least I can go 4 to 6 hours without eating during the day, but I can't imagine that I have to live off of such a rediculous diet.

Endocrinologist said it's not an endocrine problem, but I can't eat carbs anymore. I'm afraid a may eventually lose the ability to eggs too.

Went to psychiatrist and they suggested that the brain may be causing this bizarre dietary response. However, I'm not convinced. I've experienced the systomatic removal of food items and can't imagine prescribing a benzodiazipine will enable me to eat pancakes again (or even broccoli) for that matter. Very frustrated.
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First Helper ballroomeast
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replied March 20th, 2008
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There has to be something you're doing wrong, otherwise you have something else going on where your sugar is a symptom of it. What are you eating (post EVERYTHING)? There has to be something you've been doing improperly.
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replied March 21st, 2008
Extraordinary Reactive Hypoglycemia
Thank you for your response.

Unfortunately, there is nothing I am doing wrong. Systematically, my body has become used to certain foods and over compensates.

Sister was diagnosed with reactive hypoglycemia in her mid 20's when she used to pass out and have crying spells (still can continue to this day, but she seems to have it under better control), mine started at 32 and has progressively become worse.

As I stated, my initial dietary control workd just fine with complex carbohydrates, but as time progressed, the interval of time between eating decreased to the point of where I can no longer eat anything except for beef, pork and eggs. The last food group to be eliminated was cheese. I was able to do pretty good with slices of American Cheese until one day, I felt the change coming on where the adrenaline and reactive symptoms would kick in prematurely. The same thing happened with a particular brand of pre-cooked sausage that had raw sugar in its contents. I was able to eat several links for three months until the same type of response. To my surprose, I changed to this brand's other type of sausage that didn't have any sugar because it need to be cooked. Fortunately, I have been eating that successfully for 6 months now.

Bizarre, I know. This is why I'm searching for answers or those with similar problems. I have had an ultra-sound performed on my upper right quadrant and your standard battery of endocrine tests. Insulin levels are low after a 12 hour fast.

Things happen so fast now (within 20 minutes), I can't even record a drop in sugar if I were to eat carbs. A few years ago, I was able to document the drop an hour and a half after eating with a glucose meter (i.e., 115, 110, 95, 75 and then as it shot back up to the 90's, I would then feel the adrenaline rush).

So my theory is that my body has become accustomed to overreacting.
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replied March 21st, 2008
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You'd be surprised. Give me a list of everything you've been eating. For you to have this happen, you didn't do something right, that's the only possibility other than your body breaking apart. For example, you mention a sausage with SUGAR in it. You should have NEVER eaten this at all. Doing stuff like this simply progressively brings you back to the same state, I know you did something wrong just on the fact that you mentioned that little thing. What sort of complex carbs are we talking here? If white rice, bad one, you just jacked yourself for years if you ate that for awhile, it's not a complex carb and I know a few people who have made that mistake. No sugar in the other sausage? You sure? If there's anything in there like molasses, honey, turbinado, dextrose, corn syrup or a plethora of other even sneakier names, it doesn't matter. Very few sausages I've found have stuff that you can eat in them, and these types I've only found made at health food stores made IN the store. How about starch? If there was wheat in it you screwed yourself again, trust me, you did something wrong, but I need a thorough list to tell you. American Cheese? You ate processed cheese? I can't even begin to explain how much that sucks. I bet you'd do fine on raw, organic cheese. 20 minutes is also quite odd because digestion really doesn't complete for 30 minutes, otherwise any sugar you eat is immediately put into the blood through your stomach and mouth, but it still takes a bit if it's not a simple sugar. And your sugar 'shooting' up to 90 is great, that does not explain the adrenaline rush at all. If you truly have a sugar problem, I'll tell you what you did wrong, but I need a thorough list. Trust me.
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replied November 28th, 2009
I'm not a doctor, but it sounds to me like you have the classic signs of a Panic Disorder. Physically, you can probably process carbs like everyone else, but mentally, you are oversensitized to the normal effects of sugars. I would, with medical advice, try and break through this barrier you seem to have put up. When you feel the effects, tell yourself you are just being overly sensitive and it's completely normal.
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replied September 14th, 2010
your story is a Sad but ture one im now suffering from the same thing and cant seem to gain weight or eat anything its horriable and plp just dont understand how it affects your relationships and Bonds you can go to dinner enjoy food or drinks for holidays its SAD and there are No answers????
hopeless!!!
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replied January 30th, 2011
Hollowpoint, I wish I could, but it's a significant rush of adrenaline, a panic attack times 10. There' no way to think it through.

I can manage panic attacks, but the carb reaction is too intense.
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replied June 14th, 2011
I have the same thing and have reached the same point. My endocrinologist said I have panic attacks due to reactive hypoglycemia. Both times my fasting insulin was tested recently, it was nondetectable. I think this is why he believed me when I said I couldn't eat carbohydrates. He gave me a prescription for Acarbose but it did not work on fructose, so 2 small strawberries made me weak within 5 minutes and made me breath fast awhile later (20 min?). All plants have fructose so now I can tell that's what it is and I unwittingly had 1 tsp of celantro on my pork at a restaurant and felt weak for 2 hours afterward. It began by the time we left the restaurant, maybe 20 min after eating it. I have gradually given up tomatoes, cucumbers, broccoli, lettuce and now celantro which was the last one I'll try for awhile. Nuts and sesame tahini also give me reactive hypoglycemia.

I would like some help too. My endocrinologist told me my idea of only eating meat and fat might help me to get well, and that he did not think I needed to see him again. Guess I'll try the "Protein Power Lifeplan" diet by Mike Eades and search some more on the internet.
May God help us to find a cure.



Cindy
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replied July 3rd, 2015
Extremely eHealthy
you need to eat something every 2 hours that you are awake.
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replied June 16th, 2011
You need a glucose meter to see how low you go. I now have been able to document a drop and think its NIPHS or a glucose-stimulated insulinoma. I drop to 58 with just a 1/3 cup of plain oatmeal. Get a meter and see what happens to your sugar level.

I would suggest an Accu-Check Aviva meter and the multi-clicks lancets (virtually painless). I set the puncture gauge at 2 so the needle barely pricks the finger's surface. Try monitoring your glucose in the morning right before your first meal, then check it every 30 minutes after for at least 3 hours or until symptoms occur. I took me years to finally record a low sugar because I never pushed to much sugar on my diet. You may want to try drink 1/2 cup of orange juice (without eating anything else) and see what happens with your glucose levels over the next few hours or just eat some plain oatmeal (about 1/2 cup) and see what happens.

Keep us posted. The problem with these forums is that the poster never follows up. So let us know what's happening. I've been struggling for years (since 2003) and still check in. I've never met anyone with my level of sensitivity - have only heard about similar stories in medical journals. So I'm anxious to hear what happens to you...
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replied July 2nd, 2011
I do have the same type of glucose meter you describe. I was on an all-meat and fat diet which was all I could tolerate of the Protein Power Lifeplan, for 3 weeks, ending 1 week ago. I noticed I felt weak most of the time on the meat and fat diet although I was more alert and sleeping better than ever in 6 years. I found with my meter that my fasting blood sugar level was about 65 each morning and most of the day. I could barely walk after work due to weak muscles and thought it might be from this low blood sugar. I also seemed quite constipated. So, 1 week ago I went back to my primary care physician and showed her my results. She said it isn't good for me to have such a low blood sugar. She recommended adding those complex carbs to which I do not react as much as I do to other carbs (for me, the reaction includes a weak feeling for 2 hrs beginning about 5 min after I eat it, so it is easy to tell what foods I react to, and fruits and vegetables are the worst). She cautioned me not to let my blood glucose exceed 140 though. I followed her advice. I ate small amounts of corn or rice with meals, (alternating them by 4 days at a time each as recommended by an alternative MD so as not to develop food allergies). I have done as my primary care doctor said and added carbs to my diet throughout the past week. Because I couldn't bear to loose the ground I may have gained on my all meat/fat diet, I decided to try something else I found that night on the internet which was to following a 5 to 6 hour delay between meals recommended in this link: http://lowcarb4u.blogspot.com/2008/10/reac tive-hypoglycemia-experiment.html So during the past week I have delayed the time between meals religiously, even when sometimes eating meals of only meat/fat, not just for the meals with carbs, because I wasn't sure whether the rule applied to meals with meats/fats only or just to meals which included carbs. I picked 6 hours for the delay period just to be sure I'm doing it right. I think delaying the time between meals as recommended in the link above has helped me improve my tolerance for carbs during the first week of trying meal-delaying, because I seem to be less reactive to carbs than I was a week ago, and have been able to add more carbs and reduce the meat, daily. At lunch today I doubled yesterdays' carbs which seemed to make me react more during the last 3 hr of the delay time but I was ok after eating dinner 6 hr after the lunch, and for dinner I also ate more carbs than I did in yesterday's meals, only slightly less carbs than I did earlier at lunch today, but after dinner did not experience the reactions I felt after the lunch. It seems like by pushing my body to take in more carbs I am increasing my tolerance for them. (Too early to celebrate, though. I have had too many false hopes throughout the past 6 years in which I seemed to sleep better and then my sleep deteriorated again). I would like to report that 2 nights ago I had a bedtime snack of 2 T of almond butter without waiting the 5-6 hours between meals. It was about 2 or 3 hrs after dinner that I ate the almond butter bedtime snack, and it caused reactions so I had a hard time going to sleep with my airway collapsing and vowed not to do it again. I am convinced that waiting 5 1/2 to 6 hrs is important even for incidentals, for those containing carbs, at least. Maybe not for those of only meat and fat. I don't know if this is part of how it works; but, waiting the 5 1/2 to 6 hrs between meals feels like it gives my body a chance to clear out carbs that are floating around and giving me brain fog and symptioms, and my brain is definitely clearer around the 5th hour and after.

Last Sun. I tried your oatmeal experiment and with 1/4 c. of cooked plain steelcut oatmeal, with butter, I had mild reaction symptoms and my blood glucose went to 135, which is about the right target level according to my doctor's advice since it was below 140, but seems kind of high for only eating about 25 gm of carbs, the amount I estimated in the oatmeal. That level occurred at 90 min. after eating the oatmeal. My blood glucose level then went back down to 73 at 4.5 hr, 78 at 5 hr, 74 at 5.5 hr and remained 74 at 6 hr. This shows me that 5.5 hrs was the time it took me to level off, just like the length of time for my brain to clear of fog and symptoms.

On another front, last Wed. I had a cat scan of my abdomen (3rd one in 6 years, and the others yielded only minor comments of an enlarged pancreas and lakes in my liver, neither thought to be serious) which my primary doctor ordered and am waiting to hear from her if anything useful was found this time. Still, I will post the results once I hear back. I am blessed with a very patient primary care doctor, which I think the world of.
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replied July 9th, 2011
I have experienced amazing progress in my ability to eat carbohydrates without reactive hypoglycemia, following the last time I wrote, by following the recommended 6 hour meal delay that I found in the link in my message above. I am now eating everything, including starches, meat, vegetables, a daily chocolate bar, and most recently fruit; provided everything is eaten within one big meal which is eaten 3 or 4 times per day, each meal followed by no food until the next meal, and spaced by 6 hours apart. I am happy to say I am sleeping like a baby, too, ever since going onto this method of meal spacing. I consider myself to be blessed by God to be rid of the symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia, after seeing it get progressively worse since the end of 2004. I believe I've had it since I was 13 years old to some degree or another, and now am 59. It was only diagnosed this year. In my early 20's a Kaiser doctor said he thought I had a problem with sugar even though an oral glucose tolerance test he had prescribed came back normal. He recommended I just not eat sugar based on his feeling. I followed his advice for awhile and then relapsed. But now I have a way of eating carbohydrates without the symptoms.

Meanwhile, my CT scan results promised in my message above were received and are summed up in the report as, "Normal CT abdomen. Incidental cyst and hemangiomas are again noted in the liver," (as compared with the last, 2006, CT scan of my abdomen). Also stated in the report is "The pancreas also remains slightly prominent in thickness but this is also unchanged and felt represents a normal variant." "The spleen, kidneys, gallbladder, and adrenal glands are normal." As far as I can tell from this report, nothing was found that would explain reactive hypoglycemia in the CT scans of my abdomen.

My strength continues to return gradually but daily, so that now the weakness is almost gone from my legs when walking.



Cindy
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replied July 24th, 2011
Exercise Timing and Reactive Hypoglycemia
I would like to share an article about athletes and reactive hypoglycemia with others with the problem, who are not necessarily athletes. The article which is cited at the bottom can help us understand and therefore manage our reactive hypoglycemia.

It says in the article that athletes are prone to getting reactive hypoglycemia when they over-train. Maybe I am reading too much into this, but it seems to mean reactive hypoglycemia is not always an illness but can be a normal physiological response to some abnormal physical condition or combination of conditions. The conditions might be identified and controlled.

Here are the recommendations and information from the article, to which I have added my experiences with each item listed. I would like to hear from others on their own experiences so that we can learn from each other:

1. Those with relative hypoglycemia should not exercise without having eaten in the past 4 hours. (My observation: For me, Yes. I get weak if I haven't eaten for 4 hrs+ and shouldn't exercise. Not only that, but my mental state fades progressively after 4 hours. However, due to my spacing of my meals 5 to 6 hours apart, for the reason described in one of my previous messages, I can't always eat within 4 hours of exercising.

2. Those with relative hypoglycemia should not eat sweets after stopping exercising. Eating 50 gm of glucose after stopping exercising caused a 3-fold increase in insulin in the test subject in the article. (I will just take their advice rather than trying this).

3. Having one reactive hypoglycemic event puts a person at greater risk of a second reactive hypoglycemic episode for about 24 to 48 hours or more. (My observation: I haven't noticed but hadn't been looking for it. In the future I will see).

4. The time of day has an effect on an athlete's blood glucose during exercise. There is more chance of an athlete having lower blood glucose if exercising at midnight, when the body's cortisol level is lowest. (My observation on this: At night I am not actually exercising, but am having a similar activity, since I have upper airway resistance and have to struggle a little to breath. I used to get nocturnal reactive hypoglycemia regularly, waking me up at 3am and then feeling that everything was back to normal at 5:30am or after. I still do get nocturnal reactive hypoglycemia when I am not careful to space meals during the day before, as mentioned in my previous message, or if I am stressed out at bedtime. I do not know if my nocturnal reactive hypoglycemia is caused by low cortisol. I had assumed it was due to my eating habits during the previous day, but it would make more sense that it is caused by both, since if it happens it always occurs at the same time of night although I eat at different times.

5. There appears to be a complex interaction between low blood pressure, dehydration, and stress that predisposes an athlete to a reactive hypoglycemic episode. (My observations:
a. Well, I usually do have low blood pressure.
b. Drinking water does help me overcome hypoglycemic light-headedness, briefly at least. And the more water I drink seems to keep helping and to make the effect last longer. I tested my blood glucose, before and after drinking one cup of warm water, and saw a 10 mg/dL increase in blood glucose.
c. For me, a stressful situation at work depletes my brainpower rapidly to the point where it is hard to focus. Before I knew what my problem was and began to manage it I sometimes lose the ability to even speak coherently on the phone, when nervous).
So yes, to all 3 of the above, for me.

Does anyone know whether sports medicine MD's or even personal trainers or those sports supplements stores know about reactive hypoglycemia that our doctors seem to be not know?

Source: "Reactive Hypoglycemia - is it a real phenomena among endurance athletes?" by Trent Stellingwerff, PHD.
My appologies: I wish I could make a link to this article but could not because it was just a PDF floating in the internet. But it can be found it by searching for the title on the internet.

Cindy O.
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replied June 25th, 2012
Deydration Cause of Reactive Hypoglycemia, Adult-Onset Diabetes?
I have reactive hypoglycemia, and wish to report very good progress, both in sleeping and in eating carb's, which I have obtained by rehydrating. I got the idea to try this by reading internet descriptions of a water cure for early adult-onset diabetes which was discovered by the late Dr. Batmanghelidj, author of several books. Although I might not have diabetes, I decided to try rehydration since a lot of my symptoms matched internet descriptions of dehydration. After 3 weeks I began to see a reduction of my reactive hypoglycemia symptoms and now that I'm almost 4 weeks along have had about a 60% reduction in reactive hypoglycemia.

Explanation of why it might have worked, in my case of reactive hypoglycemia:
Dr. Batmanghelidj's information about diabetes, in the above link, said that during dehydration, the release of insulin is inhibited to prevent insulin from pushing water into all body cells. My lab tests showed that my fasting insulin level was nondetectable, which according to my doctor was not normal, so it seems this may have been going on in me.
I will let you know if this new treatment continues to help me by posting a follow up later. In the meantime, I will read Dr. Batmanghelidj's books. I think there was another author I got useful information from and if I can locate the reference I will post it also.

Methods I have been using:
Not having read Dr. Batmanghelidj's books, I used various information found on the internet that quoted him and miscellaneous items about correcting dehydration, and followed them.
1. Drinking 10-13 cups of plain water per day. I am 112 lbs and it is based on body size. Directions for rehydrating sometimes said to add salt, but I left salt out due to a friend's advice who reminded me that the tap water in this city, well water, is already high in sodium and that too much salt (sodium) can be injurious.
2. I drink water especially when my tongue is burning, which I notice happens after I eat too many carbohydrates or too much sugar.
3. Included in the total is a cup of water each time I wake up at night feeling hungry or thirsty, trying water as a first resort for hunger, and it seems to work most times for making me comfortable so I can go back to sleep.

If you try this, please read first about doing rehydration safely, specifically, the maximum amount of water that can be taken in without it causing death, and electrolyte balance.

Cindyo
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replied September 8th, 2012
I have continued rehydrating and rehydration has allowed me to eat a full range of foods without experiencing reactive hypoglycemia. I now am almost completely over my reactive hypoglycemia and my energy has returned. The only problem remaining is a light-headedness that feels like hypoglycemia when my blood sugar falls below 91, which happens 2 1/2 hours or more after eating. This is immediately remedied by drinking or eating.
I have read Dr. Batmanghelidj's book, "Your Body's Many Cries for Water," which describes how the pancreas is affected by chronic dehydration. It says that the pancreas withholds insulin when stressed by chronic dehydration. I believe this was the case with me.
I will continue to rehydrate. It is a miracle for which I am grateful to God.
Cindyo
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replied March 18th, 2013
hypoglycemia
how are you doing today Cindo? I too have the same symptoms and am going to try this. How often do you drink the water.. do you sip or drink it all down at once?
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replied March 18th, 2013
Update on Water Cure for Reactive Hypoglycemia
rbella
You are smart to double check on my current status. Things aren't going well currently. I am sorry to say that now I am just as limited in my diet as I was before I increased the water. Maybe this is because I had to stop drinking so much water since my hair was falling out, and I read that this may occur from drinking too much water that can wash out the minerals from the body and cutting back on the water did seem to help stop this. So now I am probably only drinking about 8 cups per day. So my problems have returned:
1. Return of my ongoing sinus problem that is proportionally linked to the amount of carbohydrates taken in, in which I get a very light to medium bloody nose soon (maybe 60 minutes - I haven't checked the timing) after eating carbohydrates, and again in the middle of the night. If I eat way too much carbohydrate I get a 2 to 3 day migraine-like headache, beginning when I wake up the next day.
2. A new problem of itchy skin such as ringworm at many locations on my face and body especially around my eyes, nose, and mouth if I eat carbohydrates. Originally I only had athlete's foot between several toes and it has returned there again. So now it's worse overall.
3. Return of a pain in the front of my pubic area that is relieved by urinating after eating carbohydrates or in the middle of the night after doing so..
4. Brain fog happens whenever I accidentally eat carbohydrates, such as at a restaurant: marinated meat, scrambled eggs probably made with cream (the lactose probably did it) and if I make new foods like grilled mushrooms. I usually notice it about 1/2 hour later, I think. Am not sure of the timing.
5. A pain in my left eye after eating carbohydrates or in the middle of the night after doing so.
There are probably more problems that have returned that I can't think of right now.
Your question is very timely. Today my sleep dentist who my HMO was kind enough to refer me to called and asked me to take my bloody nose problem up with my general practitioner, because a sleep study showed the dental appliance he gave me is not helping my sleep apnea. I have a new HMO so have a new GP and I hadn't told him any of these problems at our first meeting last April. So today I complied by making an appointment to see and tell him on Friday. My sleep dentist also recommended a CT scan of my head to see why I have sleep apnea even though I do not fit the criteria (am female and slim). So today I scheduled one for three weeks from today. Also, a few days ago, I noticed a new problem of my forgetting to inhale even while awake, when I was, tired and checked the internet and came up with "air hunger." A doctor had once told me it sounded like I had this I think after I told him I breath real fast after eating carbohydrates, and I thought he was just trying to describe my symptom back to me. I didn't realize until now it was a diagnosis. So I researched air hunger on the internet and come up with a new idea - Babesia. It is a protozoan spread by ticks that can mimic hypoglycemia. And I did have 3 ticks. I read that maybe mosquitoes can spread it too but it hasn't been proven. A blog by the victims showed they eat the same limited carb's we do. And I saw on the internet that there had been a mouse study where they gave the mice green tea to drink that cured the Babesia that they had injected into the mice and it was successful, the info I read suggesting 4 c. of green or white tea per day for 16 days, for humans. I didn't bother to read the article yet, but should to make sure the lead wasn't a cruel hoax. So, why not try it, I thought? and began taking the green tea regimen 3 days ago. Too soon to tell if it's helping. I will post the results of all of these upcoming tests that are suddenly going on when I get them.

However, here is the answer to your question. I spread the water out throughout the day. I drink 1 to 1 1/2 c. of water at a time. This is done when thirsty and if I wake up at night, and also am sure to drink this amount at 45 min. before eating, since drinking 1 cup 30 min. before eating backwashes the stomach lining and prepares the stomach for digesting according to Dr. Batmanghelidj, and I noticed I become ravenously hungry 45 min after drinking the water so I use 45 min.
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replied March 19th, 2013
hypoglycemia
Wow.. I'm so sorry about your current situation. Thank you for your reply and recommendations however..
You know I grew up eating so much junk food I was never intolerant to anything. I was however a depressed and negative type person. Not clinical depression just always in a low mood my whole life. Probably all the sugar but also just my personality. Anyway, my point is that now I cannot tolerate a lot of food. I do not go to doctors because I KNOW they cannot help me with this. I remember that show Mystery Diagnosis and felt so bad for all those people who no one could figure out what was wrong.. I cannot believe I am now one of them. My worst thing is the hypoglycemia at night. I can control it in the day as long as I eat and stay away from sugar. Although if I eat date sweeten raw deserts I can feel fine but it's at 2am when my liver seems to be doing it's cleansing that I get the reactive hypoglycemia. What has me stumped is I can go days without any sugar or hidden sugars and still wake at 2am and get hypoglycemic. This is new this year. I use to control it by not eating sugar during the day. So things do progress and get worse over the years. Another point is that I am now 46, this all started at 40. I do believe my exaggerated symptoms are now due to peri menopause. I think that having high estrogen compared to progesterone creates all these issues. Maybe this could be you too. If you google estrogen dominace you may find your symptoms match. Progesterone cream and pills make me feel better the first couple days then my estrogen gets higher so I don't think I want to go that route. Or can't. I believe I have liver congestion due to years on sleep medications. When I started to withdraw from the benzo (klonopin) this is when my hypoglycemia actually became unbearable at night.
Okay, so now the good news. After writing here to you yesterday. I googled hypoglycemia cure.. I came up with a webpage (cannot remember the name of it but may be able to find it again if you want to read it.) It says Inositol/choline in high does cures this. I had some from when I withdrew from my benzo. I wish the heck I stayed on it. Because last night was the first night without hypoglycemia in years.. it is like a miracle. I must stress a normal dose is not going to do anything. This vitamin is non toxic so you can take majorly high doeses. I have a 500mg combo of inositol/choline and took like 4 or 5 before bed and when I woke at my usual time I took four more.. I also took a gaba supplement to get rid of the adrenaline rush I get before my hypoglycemia hits. Anyway, it worked and you may want to try this out. I'm almost afraid to recommend it or say anything because seriously whenever I do it stops working for me. So I hope and prey me trying to help someone else doesn't shoot me in the foot so to speak. I can't say this will help you we do seem to have different issues. I had to cut out meat because it gave me body aches so I came to realize protiens were my issue. Isn't that bad luck since we need proteins to survive. I can have beans, rice and veges and that's it. I am finding my lack of cardio excersise could be the reason for a lot of my issues with my body. I do have other symptoms going on but I think it's peri menopause / high estrogen related. So I'm taking measures to lower my estrogen by taking calcium d glucarate.
if you try anything please let me know if it works for you. Try googling the inositol/choline and see if it can help you. I myself believe that our declining health is due to a congested or diseased liver. I think the liver is what keeps us healthy and as we age it gets weaker. So these two products I mentioned help the liver immensly.

good luck too you.. I wish you well and to find the cure you need. I also hope and pray my cure lasts. Although there is no cure for declining hormones I think we can deal with them in various matters to make us comfortable.

I forgot to mention that my hypoglycemia is in part due to anxiety but not coming from my own mind I don't believe. My body some how is just creating adrenaline at 2am on it's own. I'm fast asleep not thinking of a darn thing and I wake up with a racing heart. This could be low progesterone/high estrogen or not. But I read that once your body starts doing this it creates a highly acidic environment which creates that hunger feeling in your stomach and you then get the hypoglycemic symptoms. So I would ask you do you get the racing heart/ night sweats? This is adrenaline.. if so, then this could be your reason also for hypoglycemia and you would definately benefit from the inositol/choline in very high doses like me. Also, not sure if the gaba is necessary but it really helps. I take a good combo.. I can recommend products if you want so let me know.
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replied April 18th, 2013
rbella, I'm reading your posts and I'm thinking Wow! your frustrations are the same as mine except I'm suspecting my case has something to do with an estrogen deficiency, not dominance. Yes! I too think the night time hypoglycemia has something to do with a sluggish liver since a healthy liver is supposed to bring up our glucose during our fast when we're asleep.

Every night I keep a snack next to my bed so that as soon as my body wakes me up I wolf it down before the jitters sets in. Sometimes I wake up too late and find myself in a sweaty mess. I try to keep my adrenaline in check because it can worsen hypoglycemia, so I keep my self hydrated (I often have low blood pressure), try to eat every 3 hours. I avoid caffeine and alcohol, but I don't know ... I think the hypoglycemia adrenaline is worse than having 5 cups of expresso! It's so hard to fall back asleep once the heart pounds. Then if I don't get enough sleep I feel irritable, can't handle stress, and my adrenaline is up again. A vicious cycle.

Have you had your hormones tested? I started have premenstrual migraines at age 32 around the same time as my night time hypoglycemia wakenings. I'm 35 now. I'm wondering if the night time hypoglycemia could be from a hormone imbalance or a sluggish liver, or maybe both? Some hypoglycemics sleep through the night. Could it be that their livers are doing their job keep the glucose in supply while they sleep? But ours are not? My liver shows up fine on my recent blood test but I heard that a sluggish liver is undetectable with tests.

"Waking up between 1am - 3am means it's the time when the liver is healing itself by releasing toxins but if it is not working properly they get sent back to circulate in our blood supply. Symptoms of an overloaded liver: insomnia, migraines, vision problems, tendon issues, yellowish sallow skin, itchy skin, dark patchy skin, puffy eyes, feeling cold, mental fog, low libido." ~ Dr. Michael Galitzer

I've been taking birth control pills for 15 years non stop. Aside from the sleep issue, intolerance of supplements is a new problem for me. I can't take even small doses of certain vitamins like C and D because they cause me insomnia. Never had this problem before. I did experimented taking extra estrogen and it helped my anxiety, migraines, and blood sugar but had to stop because of side effects. Plus the oral estrogen is an assault on the liver. I ordered some milk thistle so hopefully it'll help. I used to take inositol, gaba, taurine but they don't help much with my hypoglycemia but then again like you said, maybe the dosages were too low. My Dad has insomnia and I think it's caused by his fatty liver.

How are you handling the hypoglycemia? How are you doing?
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replied March 19th, 2013
water
Oh I wanted to say also, I have the book Many Cries for Water and the reason he recommends salt is for the exact reason that you were depleted of minerals. So I can't remember if you have book or not. If not, maybe you should get it. Or just add a pinch of sea salt to I think it is a quart or liter of water. That's all you need. I also use Cell Salts ( a homeopathic) mineral collaberation. That is great. It's very popular they say at my health food store. I think I went through this mineral depletion as well back when I was drinking a ton more water than I am now. If the water thing was working for you try it with the salt. 11 to 12 glasses or cups as you said isn't really that much to cause too many issues.. but then again we are here for a reason.
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replied March 19th, 2013
rbella,
Thanks,I will begin using your salt suggestion and try drinking more water right away. Yes, I had a lot of adrenaline all the time before getting the sleep appliance two months ago, with night sweats and racing heart and fast breathing upon awakening. The adrenaline problem is the one thing the sleep appliance seems to have helped with. It seems to help my airway not to collapse while I am falling asleep so these few things I just mentioned seem to have thankfully cleared up. I am 61 years old, 61/2 years after menopause but am thinking of trying the progesterone you mentioned. My hair loss has normalized since the adrenaline problem was helped. I had forgotten this in my last message and in the message I blamed all of the hair loss on drinking the extra water but this wasn't so. Probably a good part of it was the adrenaline judging by the lack of hairloss ocurring after adrenaline was helped.
I too had a junk food diet before these problems began. Your thoughtful reply was like medicine to me. I believe God has helped us to help each other and others who share these problems. I will pray for you.

cindyo
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replied March 19th, 2013
apnea
You know I do have breathing issues. I don't think it's apnea although there is a form of apnea that isn't due to collapsing airways but due to the brain not communicating. I probably have that if I have it. Reason I think this is because there were times when I would do concentrated breathing during my adrenaline rushes and I would fall back to sleep. I give on doing then when It doesn't work just once. I should try it again. I wear those breathe right strips at night. I also have very narrow passages so said my dentist. So this is probably part of my issue. I do think there are certain things to do to relax to create a smoother breathing. Since I didn't get adrenaline last night I can only suspect it relaxed me enough to keep my breathing smooth. I took large doses of the inositol/choline which helps with people with apnea's. As well as the gaba supp which had high doses of magnesium. I took too much because I had diareah this morning. I'd rather sleep though at this point. Magnesium is very important. So if your not supplementing with it you might try it.

Well good luck to you with the water and all. I hope we both find our cures/miracles.
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