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Narcotic Addiction - Hydrocodone and Oxycodone

6 months ago i finally got rid of the addiction that was controlling my life. I dont crave for it but i feel out of my mind and have so bad of anxiety that i sometimes feel like i'm dieing. I fear everything. My body trembles and hurts so bad. I have times where i cant breathe or stop breathing. I'm worried and don't know exactly what is going on. My mouth stays moist and full of saliva and mucus. What can i do to get rid of this. It's mentally messing with me and driving me nuts to the point to where i dont feel like getting out of bed. I was very active in high school, played all sports. But after graduating i had problems with a girlfriend and drugs became my comfort and now i'm paying for it. I just want it to stop! Pls Help. And is this normal?? and for how long??
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replied June 3rd, 2009
Extremely eHealthy
This isn't normal. You need to either go see your regular physician, an addiction medicine specialist, or a psychiatrist. This may or may not be a result of you going off the pain medication. It's been a while, so it may be something else. Sounds like you are having symptoms of anxiety and depression, in addition to your physical symptoms. Don't let this go.

If you feel you need more help, there is no shame in asking for it. If you need to go to rehab to reaffirm your sobriety, then do so. You deserve to live a full and normal life.
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replied June 3rd, 2009
What else could it be honestly? Its pushing me over the edge and i just want to feel normal again.
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replied June 25th, 2009
know the feeling!! I"m a recovering stadol addict,for those of you who are not famalir with the drug it is liquid morphine that you shoot up your nose.It is used for those who suffer from migraines.I have a year and a half sobriety and it is still hard for me.I found out a lot of the symptoms that you have I had to.I went to see a professional and found out it was linked to depression and anxiety.I have been taking the medication that the doc prescribed,I attend AA/NA meetings about 3 times a week and I have found that the meetings and meds have really worked.Some people dont agree to these meetings and at first I didnt either,but you would be suprised about how many people there have been thru exactly what you are going thru.It helped me maybe it can help you,it wont hurt to try.
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replied June 26th, 2009
Narcotics Anonymous or AA (yes, alcohol is a drug) is the only thing that has ever worked for me and I tried everything. I was addicted to drugs for 13 years and physically addicted to pain meds for 7 of them. It took me a long time to admit I had a problem. I tried to disqualify myself in every way because I don't meet the stereo-type, but today there is no doubt in my mind I am an addict. Addiction is a serious, medically proven disease, and treatment is the only way to get better. It's a disease of the mind and drugs are only a symptom. It's a lot to swallow, or at least it was for me, but I know exactly how you feel. I've been there. Try to be open-minded. I needed to ask for help, will-power doesn't help someone with addiction it makes us sicker. I have been clean for 18 months, and my life is better than ever, not always easy, but I have some freedom and happiness. There is hope. I was ashamed to be in NA at first, because omg what would people think of me. Surprise! they like me a lot better in NA than before, and its not like I have NA tatooed on my forehead, you would never guess I am a drug addict. I'm an intelligent, beautiful young woman, graduate of a top NY design school, gifted artist and recovering drug addict.

LOL... good luck feeling normal. I know if normal existed it wouldn't be an addict. I am just blessed.
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replied June 28th, 2009
Yes ditto what the 2 above me said. I was addicted to perscription pain pills and got involved with AA and NA. These groups are truly miracles. Ive been clean for 3 months now and mentally I feel great. I have my moments but I've learned how to deal with them. Good luck!
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replied June 30th, 2009
Im a 27 year old female. I was addicted to pain pills and then methadone for four years. NA saved my life. It sounds as though you are having panic attacks. If you were to go to the Dr. they usually prescribe anti anxitey meds that again are addicting.I am not a Dr. there my be new drugs on the market. Talking to a therapist works. Also when I get that feeling I make myself get up and do something different. I have to quickly get my mind off of that feeling. Rapid heart beat, hard to breath, feeling dizzy. Its and awful feeling but it is amazing what your mind is capable of. Best of luck! Its a best feeling in the world to be drug free.
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replied June 22nd, 2010
pain addiction
What most addicts do not think about is the long term effect of it. My sister started taking pain meds in 2000 for back surgery , then she got hooked. She now has a condition of the stomach which is permanent and very serious, where her stomach no longer empties into her colon, bile will now build up in her stomach, weight loss is severe sometime where a feeding tube is required. Her condition was brought on from the pain and anti depressants she has used for the last 10 years. She has been off the pain meds for about 1 month and has to take reglan for her stomach, she has lost 28 pounds and does not eat. So all out there get off the pain pills as soon as you can if you want to live a good life. My sister has not accomplished it yet. And she has a permanent illness now. Thanks for all the comments on NA I am going to help her get into NA.
cw
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replied June 29th, 2010
Anyone who has anxiety, depression, chronic pain, chronic fatigue, diabetes, addiction issues and a host of other medical conditions, but especially those with chronic pain who have developed dependency on opiates in any form MUST READ Dr. Mark Starr's book: Type 2 Hypothyroidism: The Epidemic

YOU WILL BE AMAZED AT THE RESEARCH THAT HAS BEEN IGNORED BY THE MEDICAL ESTABLISHMENT THAT COULD HAVE SAVED MILLIONS FROM NEEDLESS PAIN AND SUFFERING.

I have had fibromyalgia, depression, chronic fatigue, IBS, and a host of other problems for 30 years. All of it can be attributed to Type 2 hypothyroidism which went undetected until recently and was NOT FOUND with the standard thyroid blood tests. I started totally natural treatment and I have been able to kick the opiates FINALLY. I am feeling better every day. There is hope!
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replied July 13th, 2010
Narcotic Addiction
Introduction:
Addiction is a psycho-behavioral, neurobiological disorder that compels the addicted person to seek illicit drugs, to satisfy his/her cravings, despite knowing there is harm, dysfunction, and despite adequate pain control.

Study Methods:
We reviewed several review articles using Medline, English only, key words of ‘chronic pain’ and ‘addiction’, between 2000 and 2007. A few articles were picked.

Findings:
Several pain management authorities attempted to agree on a conventional definition of addiction. This has been quite difficult because of the stigma and myths about the “difficult pain patients”, and because of behavioral, spiritual, and societal factors. In addition, there is controversy on the role of narcotics in the treatment of non-malignant pain and the very subjective nature of pain. To complicate the issue further, providers confuse pseudo-addiction, tolerance, physical dependence, withdrawals syndromes, and other substance abuse with addiction. This creates chaotic treatment plans. Providers are nor well-versed nor well-trained to dealing with this. Many pain patients suffer in the meanwhile.

Conclusion:
More addiction research and health care provider education has to occur to clarify the saga on addiction to narcotics.

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replied November 16th, 2011
I am the person who loves the addict...questions.
I am reading all of what you are saying. My fiance is currently detoxing off of a physical addiction to hydros. He is alreayd in the process and has reduced his intake to a fourth of a 10 daily. I have not been able to see him for three already and he does not know how much longer it might be. He is going to try and go without starting a couple of days from now. I am not meaning to be or sound selfish because his goal of sobreity means so much more to me than this...but for me, on the side of the person going through this process in a completely different viewpoint...what do I do? I know he is protecting our relationship by staying in touch via text and calling when he can. I don't want there to become a strange distance between us either. How do I help protect us as well-or do I not have a choice here if I'm really on board? I feel confused. What does a detoxer/recovering addict need from their significant other? I went to my first al anon meeting today but advice can't be given there.
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