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must clear up styes before Chemo / Stem Cell Transplant

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My wife has recurring Styes (Chalazia) that must be addressed before Chemo / Stem Cell Transplant for Multiple Myeloma. We believe that the previous chemo drugs (Dexamethasone, Thalidomide/Pomalyst) contributed to the eye styes. They have been recurring for over a year now. She has tried antibiotics, antibiotic eyedrops, hot wash clothes, hot tea bags, and had one stye surgically removed. She was free from them for about a month following a break in chemo treatment and hitting them hard with antibiotics, but they came back. She has to clear them up again before she begins a Stem Cell Transplant because her immune system will be very weak.

Please help! Our Oncologyst and Eye Specialist both seem to be at a loss and just trying the same antibiotics over and over. We are looking for some unique suggestions here please!


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replied September 29th, 2015
Vision and Eye Disorders Answer A54050
Hello,

Welcome to the ehealthforum and I am really glad to help you out. Your concern is regarding the recurrent chalazia that your wife is having especially when she is planning for chemo/ stem cell transplant.

A chalazion is an accumulation of material in the eyelid as a result of a blocked oil gland and there is no underlying cause for the same. For recurrent chalazia, your wife can use pre-moistened eyelid cleansing wipes to maintain hygiene.

Other than that, regular use of topical or oral antibiotics can also be prescribed to prevent any further recurrence. However if the size is big or it is obstructing field of vision then it may need to be removed surgically. Patients with underlying conditions such as rosacea, seborrheic dermatitis or blepharitis are more prone to multiple and recurrent chalazia. So your wife needs to get evaluated for these conditions also as they may be responsible for recurrent chalazia.

It is very difficult to precisely confirm a diagnosis without examination and investigations and the answer is based on the medical information provided. For exact diagnosis, you are requested to consult your doctor. I sincerely hope that helps. Take care.


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