Hi, I really need help with my mother! She is a single mother, and had her first episode of schizophrenia when I was 12. That left me extremely traumatized, as I have no other family, only her, and at the age of 12 she was tearing apart walls with a knife and was really paranoid of people recording her/videotaping her; she didn't sleep for two whole days and was becoming quite aggresive and protective of me (she threw a blanket on me and shielded me with a tray as to protect me from some supposed gas attack from outside). Now, I'm 22 and still I tremble everytime symptons of this problem prop up. It happened again about 2 years back, and we lied about my grandpa being sick so she quickly boarded a flight and flew to India. There is our whole family for support and she was treated there.

Now, the problem seems to be back. She keeps telling me to ask doctors about microchips being planted into her body which read her mind and than broadcast those thoughts on radio and tv. I need help!
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First Helper User Profile MyrahU
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replied August 31st, 2011
Extremely eHealthy
I think you should try to get her help closer to home. It sounds like she needs to see a psychiatrist on a regular basis and needs more consistent medication. Getting care just when she has a mental break isn't the best way. The less consistent her care is, the worse she could get going forward. In her current mental state, she might be resistant to seeing someone, but since she did agree to get help in India, you might be able to get her to voluntarily get care now. Since she did ask you to ask doctors about the microchips, she might agree to see a doctor, thinking that it's about the microchips, when it's actually a psychiatrist who is going to help her. Even if she has to be in the hospital for a little while, you have to trust that the professionals want to help her and know what is best.

If you don't know where to start, start by calling your local mental health department, or look up what providers are covered under your mom's insurance and start calling them, or call local hospitals mental health departments. Someone will be able to direct you.

I think it is also important for you to get some support, either from friends or from some kind of support group for family members of people with mental illness. You've been dealing with this since you were very young and no child should have to be expected to take care of their parent at such a young age, but you didn't have a choice. I'm sure you have a lot of feelings of fear, anger, loneliness, frustration, and a bunch of other things that you really wish you could talk to someone about. Reach out for help for yourself, too.

I wish you and your mom all the best. I hope she gets the help she needs very soon.
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replied August 31st, 2011
Myrah, thanks for your reply. After her first episode, she was hospitalized here in Canada. She ran out into a mall with her head covered with a tray fearing she was being gassed. Onlookers called 911. Things were going steady for a good 4-5 years after that episode, she went back to college, started working as a Health Care Assistant. Things changed again after her psychiatrist retired, who would follow up with every few weeks. The hospital never referred her to a new psychiatrist and pretty much told her she was on her own, and to just stick to her medication. Sadly, when I was in grade 10, another episode happened again despite the medication and this time she refused to venture outside the house. She pretty much barricaded herself in a room, even moved a bed to keep the door shut. Not knowing what to do, this is when I convinced her to go to India to her family, where her parents could actually deal with her issues. I simply freeze in fear at this condition and don't know how to react or respond. She was in India for a good 3-4 months, and they put her on Olanzapine. She had been taking it consistently, but since early this year reduced her dosage from 7.5mg to 5mg. She told me a month or so back that she is starting to feel it all coming back and therefore she will increase her dose. It is hard for me to find out if she has done this; the moment I ask her about her medication, she will think of me as "naive" who does not know about the evil cunning people recording her. I don't know how to handle her. In Canada, I don't even know how to take her to a doctor. She already doesn't trust me regarding doctors and her medication. During her last episode, she explicitly told me when I brought her a glass of juice that she will not drink it and get it herself, fearing that I probably mixed medication in it.

I will try to talk to her tonight, although I feel petrified dealing with her in her condition, that the voices she is hearing on tv and radio talking to her are her hallucinations and she should try to get medication and rest. Only problem is, once she starts shooting down my explanations, I don't really have much but to sit there dumbfounded, scared, and not knowing what to do.
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replied August 31st, 2011
Oh and an important thing I forgot again Myrah, she didn't agree to get help in India. We convinced her to fly to India saying that her father was ill.
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replied September 1st, 2011
Extremely eHealthy
Try contacting the department of mental health and maybe you can get some guidance from them. Is she covered under the Canadian medical care system? If so, try to get her into a psychiatrist under that. I don't think you are equipped to deal with this on your own, you don't have the training and you don't have the emotional where-with-all to tackle this by yourself. You can't reason her out of this or into getting treatment, not at this point. You need more assistance. Maybe try to get some relatives to fly in from India to help you, if you can.

You also need to talk to whom ever provides her care and get some on-going guidance on how to deal with her in her condition, so you don't feel as frightened. You have a lot of previous experience with this that has understandably traumatized you and every time you deal with this, it brings all that back up again. Get some professional to help you with this, if you can.
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replied September 2nd, 2011
Active User, very eHealthy
Being ill all of the time I will always be jealous of canadiens, and hockey isn't bad either, the only sport where you can have a fist fight if someone pisses you off.

You don't seem to know much about the disease, if it is one anyway, learn all that you can about it is my advice.

Oh, and try not to do that thing that people do, you know when you look at us like horrible monsters, it totally hurts bro!

I didn't want "help" either, I knew what was happening to an extent anyway, so of course a pill can't help.

So I got "help" and now my body is very ill. Probably should've stuck it out. I didn't really have any help though and couldn't have done that.

And stop calling them "episodes", thats so annoying.
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replied September 2nd, 2011
Extremely eHealthy
What would you rather they be called? Psychotic breaks? That's what they are clinically called. I thought "episodes" was a nicer term.
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