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miscarriages - connection with male spermiogram ?

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In the last two years I had two miscarriages, the first in 6th week of pregnancy, the second in 11th week. Do you think it could be a result of the bad morphology of my husband's sperm? The diagnosis is TERATOZOOSPERMIA.
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replied November 9th, 2009
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First, I am deeply sorry for your losses. Losing a baby, born or not is unspeakably difficult to overcome. May you find some good out of such horrible situations.
Yes, it could, as any morphology in the sperm raises the risks of genetic defects in the embryo/fetus. Many early miscarriages are due to a genetic defect of some sort and teratozoospermia may increase the incidence of miscarriages due to genetic defects. There are tests that can be done to determine what type of teratozoospermia your husband has, as there are three types and each type has its own risks as far as genetics are concerned.
The three types are:
-“polymorphic teratozoospermia'', where a majority of spermatozoa display more than one type of abnormality.

-The second group, named “globozoospermia'', is characterized by round spermatic heads, absence of acrosome and disorganization of mid-piece and tail. In this case, some studies have shown a significant, but moderate, increase in the aneuploidy frequency for acrocentrics and sex chromosomes. (This type may have a significant increase of genetic abnormalities resulting in a miscarriage)

-The third group consists of “enlarged head teratozoospermia'', where almost all spermatozoa have an enlarged head, multiple tail and abnormal acrosome. In this case a very high level of missegregation is observed, leading to nearly 100% aneuploidy. In this particular group, ICSI must be refuted, and patients have to be redirected to other possibilities, like sperm donation.(This one carries the most risk of genetic defects or even infertility itself)

I would advise your husband get tested to see which type of teratozoospermia he has and to get a geneticist involved, as they can help determine the best route of fertility treatments for you. It is possible for you to conceive a healthy baby, although there may be options to do so that you may not want to try, such as conception via sperm donor or IVF, if not all of his sperm are affected. Best of luck to you and I hope your doctor or geneticist can help you determine a good way to conceive a healthy baby.
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replied November 10th, 2009
motherofthehighspiritedones thank you so so much for your reply!!
I find it very useful. I will try to find a geneticist and we will talk with him. But in my country- Macedonia, the health care (especially in the area od fertility) is not very developed, so I am afraid if there are any analysis of the type what kind of teratozoospermia my husband has???

I wish we get our answers and get blessed!

Thank you
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replied November 25th, 2009
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aleka wrote:
motherofthehighspiritedones thank you so so much for your reply!!
I find it very useful. I will try to find a geneticist and we will talk with him. But in my country- Macedonia, the health care (especially in the area od fertility) is not very developed, so I am afraid if there are any analysis of the type what kind of teratozoospermia my husband has???

I wish we get our answers and get blessed!

Thank you
The only thing that is needed to find out what type he has are a microscope and a sample of his sperm. This will show the shape of the sperm.
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