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I was wondering if anyone could give advice whether or not mint addiction is due to lack of certain vitamin or whether or not there is any other medical condition related to being addicted to mint?
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First Helper GuruMeraki
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replied December 30th, 2008
Community Volunteer
I don't think it means you have a vitamin deficiency, but it has wonderful healing properties for the digestive tract, and who doesn't like a clean minty freshness?

Here's what this site has to say:

http://health.learninginfo.org/benefits-mi nt.htm

For centuries, mint has been enjoyed for its wonderful aroma, its great taste, and its healing power. Long known for its ability to settle a nervous stomach, mint has a great many other health benefits as well. Whether as a soothing mint tea or part of a recipe, mint has long been part of both the cuisine and the medicinal cultures of societies as diverse as the Middle East, India and Europe.

Mint is well known for its ability to sooth the digestive tract and reduce the severity and length of stomach aches. In addition, mint teas and other herbal preparations have shown great promise at easing the discomfort associated with irritable bowel syndrome, and even at slowing the growth of many of the most harmful bacteria and fungi. The well-documented antifungal properties of mint are thought to play a role in the treatment of asthma and many allergy conditions as well.

It is even thought that mint may have benefits as an anticancer food. Mint is known to contain a phytonutrient called perillyl alcohol, which has been shown in studies on animals to prevent the formation of colon, skin and lung cancer. Further study is needed to see if this important benefit extends to the human world.

Mint is used in a variety of ways, but the most common is through the brewing of mint tea. There are many excellent mint teas on the market, and fresh mint tea can be made by pouring hot, but not boiling, water over fresh leaves of mint. When preparing mint tea, it is important that the preparation be covered while it is steeping to prevent the valuable volatile oils from evaporating.

For those who prefer their mint in pill form, there are a number of preparations on the market that make it easy to enjoy the many health benefits of mint. Supplements containing mint are widely available at health food stores, at supermarkets and of course on the internet.
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replied April 10th, 2009
mint addiction
i have been addicted to any kind of mints, the more menthol the better and i mean like eating 10 to 15 mints per day.
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replied December 9th, 2015
the same with me I love altoids like 20 a day
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replied August 21st, 2010
the Altoids with natural flavors get me, if i do not pay attention i will polish off the whole tin in less than an hour and start on another. the only real problem i see with this is the sugar which makes up like 95%+ of the ingredients by weight. and the sugar free Altoids are not nearly as strong, not to mention the studies that have shown that 'fake' sugar is worse for you than real(but still better than high-fructose corn syrup).
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replied December 14th, 2011
mint tea addiction
i drink strong mint tea, and chew up the bags, up to 40 bags a day, now I have orthostatic hypotension, which means that I am close to fainting with quick motion, have have heart palpitations, I don't know how to help myself, especially since I haven't been working
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replied February 28th, 2012
Problem???
I eat bags of mints a day. Do I have a problem?
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replied March 5th, 2012
peppermint toxicity
are you being sarcastic - I am not getting the sugar like I was when I could polish off a tin of altoids in an hour - postural hypotension, feels like pre-syncope, anyone educated around here?
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replied April 20th, 2015
same there 75p what a BARGIN ayyyy x)
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replied June 23rd, 2012
I know this post has gone stale for a bit, but yes you can get addicted to mint. It gives a distinct sensation in your mouth which makes it addicted more in the way that marijuana is addictive, rather in the way that alcohol is. The sugar intake you are experiencing is why you are suffering from postural hypotension. The high levels of sugar, at first, most likely gave you energy. Now your body has probably adapted to the volume of sugar and expects to receive that amount and/or more. This is the difference between addiction and abuse. Addiction grows. But I digress: To overcome the postural hypotension, I'd suggest a B Vitamin complex as it aids hemoglobin in transporting oxygen with the assistance of sugar, as well as Cinnamin supplements because they are known to balance out the body's sugar levels. To decrease your consumption rate without going through withdraws, I'd suggest getting the mouth spray or growing a legitimate mint plant (oh no, work) and making homemade tea out of it. That way your brain gets it's satisfaction and you are consuming fewer synthetics which will eventually cause problems down the line as well.

Hope that helps!
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Users who thank GuruMeraki for this post: kristybarnes2010 

replied June 5th, 2016
I'm addicted to mint, but not particularly minty sweets, just mint flavour in general, the refreshing, cool taste. I drink sveral cups of mint tea per day and I've been doing that for years, I don't know why I never get enough of it. And it's not just tea, I crave anything minty all the time. Does my body ask for mint because I have a shortage of vitamins or minerals or anything else that I should be concearned about?
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replied August 10th, 2012
Menthol to Mint
I have recovered from an addiction to menthol cough drops but lost a molar out of it. The it changed to peppermint as I began eating and chewing mints to soothe my nervous stomach. Now I will get dressed and go out to the store at night just to get mints. I read about the benefits of mint just now. I have weird lesions on my skin that could very well be cancerous, and I have suffered from irritable bowel since I was in college. So perhaps it is my body asking for mint.
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replied August 10th, 2012
Menthol to Mint
I have recovered from an addiction to menthol cough drops but lost a molar out of it. The it changed to peppermint as I began eating and chewing mints to soothe my nervous stomach. Now I will get dressed and go out to the store at night just to get mints. I read about the benefits of mint just now. I have weird lesions on my skin that could very well be cancerous, and I have suffered from irritable bowel since I was in college. So perhaps it is my body asking for mint.
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replied October 11th, 2012
I'm addicted to mints, I eat a share size bag a day of various types, and I get all irritible if I don't have any, and HAVE to go buy some.

I have made a Facebook group to see how many other people have the problem/addiction
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replied September 16th, 2016
fine
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