Hello, I am 14 so to young to do anything now, but I was wondering if you could give me some info or input on my plan

1 Be a lifeguard from 16 - 18
2 Become a paramedic (Be a lifeguard during school)
3 Practice as a paramedic for year or 2
4 Take med school
5 Be a doctor doctor

Thanks, I don't know much about anything so any feedback or info into how I do these things would be awesome.

Thanks!
Did you find this post helpful?
First Helper User Profile Gaelic
|

User Profile
replied November 10th, 2012
Especially eHealthy
RSEW,

Sounds like a decent plan. Are you going to go to school while you are working, or are you going to go to college after you work for a couple of years?

You can major in anything you wish, as an undergraduate, and still go to medical school. In fact, most medical schools are looking at students who are not "straight science" majors, as better candidates for medical school.

You still have to take the pre-med required courses. Be sure that you check the requirements of the medical school(s) you want to apply to. They are basically the same, but some have a couple of extra required courses that others may not have.

Usually, you have to take:
1. One year of inorganic chemistry, with labs
2. One year of organic chemistry, with labs
3. One year of physics, with labs
4. One year of biology, with labs

Most schools also require calculus level math courses and English composition. Again, you have to check the specific school’s requirements, there may be other requirements.


So, be sure that you take the courses in high school that will allow you to take the science requirements. But, you can major in anything that you like in college.

Some students find it hard to take the required courses and work full time. But, some students can do it. It is up to you, but you do have to maintain a high GPA to have any chance of getting into medical school.

Some students also find it hard to return to school after being out for a while. But, again, many students do just that.

Towards the end of your college, most medical schools require that you take the MCAT (medical college admissions test). So, you have to plan your courses so that you are prepared to take this exam.


Being a paramedic may help you some with medical school. Just because you will be used to being around patients and working in that environment. But, medical school is a whole different world from that of a paramedic.


Good luck with your plans. If you have any other quesitons, ask.
|
Did you find this post helpful?
Users who thank Gaelic for this post: RSEW 

replied November 10th, 2012
Gaelic wrote:
RSEW,

Sounds like a decent plan. Are you going to go to school while you are working, or are you going to go to college after you work for a couple of years?

You can major in anything you wish, as an undergraduate, and still go to medical school. In fact, most medical schools are looking at students who are not "straight science" majors, as better candidates for medical school.

You still have to take the pre-med required courses. Be sure that you check the requirements of the medical school(s) you want to apply to. They are basically the same, but some have a couple of extra required courses that others may not have.

Usually, you have to take:
1. One year of inorganic chemistry, with labs
2. One year of organic chemistry, with labs
3. One year of physics, with labs
4. One year of biology, with labs

Most schools also require calculus level math courses and English composition. Again, you have to check the specific school’s requirements, there may be other requirements.


So, be sure that you take the courses in high school that will allow you to take the science requirements. But, you can major in anything that you like in college.

Some students find it hard to take the required courses and work full time. But, some students can do it. It is up to you, but you do have to maintain a high GPA to have any chance of getting into medical school.

Some students also find it hard to return to school after being out for a while. But, again, many students do just that.

Towards the end of your college, most medical schools require that you take the MCAT (medical college admissions test). So, you have to plan your courses so that you are prepared to take this exam.


Being a paramedic may help you some with medical school. Just because you will be used to being around patients and working in that environment. But, medical school is a whole different world from that of a paramedic.


Good luck with your plans. If you have any other quesitons, ask.


Thanks a ton. Well, can you work as a paramedic during med school? i thought it wouldn't really work, but that would be sweet if I could. Also, why not the science majors, that's what i was planning to do as i am fairly good at science and math. Thanks for your help Smile
|
Did you find this post helpful?

User Profile
replied November 10th, 2012
Especially eHealthy
RSEW,

You can be a science major; in fact, most medical school students do have a science major. What the medical schools are looking for is a well-rounded student. They do not want someone who is a total book worm, who has not gotten out and done other things. So, extracurricular activities and jobs are really looked at by the medical schools. They also look at other majors, because a physician has to be able to interact with people. Many times, the straight science majors are great at the book work, but they have a hard time working with patients. So, the medical schools are looking for students who can not only do the required studies but also work well with others. In my medical school class we had music and ballet majors, psychology, education, business, as well as the usual biology and chemistry majors. So again, the medical school requirements are not very much of the time you will spend in college. If science is what you are really interested in, then major in one of the sciences. But, if you are interested is something else, you can major in that and still get the required medical school courses.

It is very difficult to work and go to medical school. In fact, some medical schools will not allow the students to work while they are a student. The curriculum in medical school is very intense and takes a lot of studying after hours. Be sure to check with the school as to their policy on working while going to school.

If you are going to need assistance going to school, there are a lot of scholarships out there. But, you do have to look and do research. The military is one way that a lot of students pay for med school. The military has two courses; one is the military medical school in Bethesda, MD, and the other is the HPSP (health professions scholarship program) where you can go to just about any credited med school and the military will pay for it. You do owe service time for the scholarship. So, be sure you want to be in the military if you go this route. But, there are also a lot of other scholarships out there.

When you get to the clinical years (three and four), you will be in the hospital for long periods of time. While the hours required of med studs and residents have been reduced in the past few years, you are still looking at up to 80 hours a week in the "house".

So, again, just check the requirements of the school that you want to attend. It is never too early to write to the admissions office of that school, stating that you are entered in attending, that you are still in high school, but do they have any advice of courses you should take in high school and college. Ask what they are looking for in a candidate. Do they want to see extracurricular activities? How about work in the medical field (some schools want to see a candidate have paid or voluntary experience in a hospital or even as a paramedic). So, again, it is not too early to write to the admissions office of the medical school you are interested in attending.


Good luck.
|
Did you find this post helpful?
Users who thank Gaelic for this post: RSEW 

replied November 10th, 2012
WOW. thanks so much, i got more from you in 10 mins then anywhere else combined. I am going to go research schools and see where I want to go and, basically, do everything you said. Thanks so much, RSEW
|
Did you find this post helpful?

User Profile
replied November 10th, 2012
Especially eHealthy
No problem. If you come up with further questions, just ask.
|
Did you find this post helpful?
Quick Reply