Hello, I know it's long but please read! Very Happy

I am not trying to push anything upon any of you, but if someone had not informed me I would have never known that I did not have MS.

I am a 22 year old male formerly a resident of Vancouver Island British Columbia Canada. I was bitten by a tick in my right shoulder when I was ten years old. I did not have the classic target rash that doctors state you must have to have contracted Lyme disease. Obviously being young I was quite alarmed and pulled the tick out of my shoulder leaving the head to continue burrowing into my shoulder. I went to the doctor had the tick removed and the tick was sent to a lab to be tested for lyme disease. The test came back "negative".

Through my teens years I can now recall many problems now that I am aware of the effects of Lyme disease. I became very tired, often not being able to keep my head up or my eye lids open. My cognitive functions began to decrease. Quite often I was plagued with flu like symptoms as well as sleep issues and memory loss. When I was fifteen numbness and tingling began in my left foot progressing through my left leg up the left side of my back and into my left arm and hand lasting for 3-6 weeks I cannot remember accurately. Being quite concerned I went to see my family GP at the time and he told me just wait it out see what happens your probably fine...... I then requested an x-ray of my spine and everything came back normal. He told me I would be fine and just to wait it out, it will go away at some point. Being young I took his advice and yes after a few more weeks I was fine. Then it happened 4 more times from 15 years of age to 20 years of age. Every time I went to my GP and was told the same thing oh just see what happens it should go away... Each time it did after several weeks. Then in march 2006 at the age of 20 my vision in my left eye became severely distorted. I went to an optometrist which immediately rushed me to a retinal specialist. Who through a series of visits determined that I might have optic neuritis, something common in Multiple Sclerosis Patients. However the retinal specialist said it was not classic optic neuritis, it seemed quite different. The retinal specialist then sent me to an opthamologist who determined I was partially colour blind and there was nothing more he could tell me. By this point it was june of 2006 coming up on my 21st birthday and I was lost with no more doctors willing to help me and fearing that I may go blind. After about 6 emergency room visits I finally found a doctor who sent me to a neurologist which led me to an MRI. The MRI detected brain lesions. I went to my new GP at the time who sat me down at the age of nearly 21 and said, "The MRI has found Brain Lesions that suggest Multiple Sclerosis, this is a life altering diagnosis you need to plan around the fact that your body most likely will not function as it is now. Do not rely on being able to work and use the function of your legs properly for much longer". How could he even have the right to say such things...??? Or how could he even tell me I have Multiple Sclerosis off of an MRI result that says "Brain Lesions that may suggest Multiple Sclerosis". There are so many disease and other issues that can cause these Brain Lesions. Immediately I requested a Lyme disease test because of my past, this was actually my second Lyme Disease test "requested by me" in Canada and both came back negative. So on I went with the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and began to see a doctor at one of the MS clinics, who reviewed my case and confirmed the diagnosis from my MRI result and no further testing. The MS Doctor said to me "Your brain lessions and your symptoms refelt Multiple Sclerosis and I believe your case is very cut and dry and does not need more testing". Multiple Sclerosis is NOT an easy disease to diagnose, nor should a diagnosis of MS being taken so lightly... In less than 4 months I went from possible optic neuritis to Multiple Sclerosis to being put on MS meds "Rebif Interferon Beta 1". Which has a whole list of scary side effects by the way. So I remained with my diagnosis for the next 15 months, taking my MS meds 3 times a week, doing self injections of the rebif at home. Rebif constantly left me feeling worse than better. I would get awful flu like symptoms, horrible joint aches and many other issues. The worst of all was waking up the next more after my shot and my spine felt like it was completely drained of fluid. It felt as if my spine was stapled together and when I would move it felt like everything was being ripped apart. Anyway I stuggled through the side effect and my condition was rapidly becoming worse. After about 8 months I was beginning to have trouble getting up stairs and my vision was so bad I could barely see the TV clear from 10 feet away. At about 15 months I had to use the hand rail to get up a flight a stairs and even that wasn't easy! "I have not listed the other 28 symptoms of my condition that I had been having because the story would go on forever"... Then one day my girlfriend saw something on the discouvery channel about this girl that was having the same issues I was, and the doctors were telling her the same thing and that she needed psychiatric help she was mentally unstable. She then on her own found out she had Lyme disease through some testing lab in Europe. I then began consumed on the computer researching which led me to a lab in California that would test for Lyme disease and they were acclaimed to be the most accurate testing in north america I believe. So I sent my blood down there and after three weeks I had a positive Lyme Disease Result. That was about the best Christmas present I think I have ever received! I know that's kind of odd to say but Lyme Disease is much better than MS!!! A week Prior to my Lyme positive result I was informed that my liver enzymes were quite high and I had to discontinue the MS medication. So with my positive Lyme result I saw a amazing doctor in Hope British Columbia who has led me on the path of recovery through antibiotics! My vision has drastically improved since being on the antibiotics and my legs feel like they used to 5 years ago!!! My other 28 symptoms have began to go away as well! I only hope I will continue to improve as I am and now I am trying to create awareness about this ever growing issue. I can only imagine how many people are going through what I have gone through and I bet many of them will never find out that they have lyme disease, not one of the many other disease commonly mis-diagnosed as Lyme Disease!

Sorry if I rambled and this may be long but please don't let people around you go improperly treated or mis diagnosed if you have even slightest idea that they may have had some exposer to ticks. Which could very well be something as simple as gardening or hiking.

Thanks for your time.

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First Helper andrewjf
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replied October 5th, 2008
Community Volunteer
MS is NOT a death sentence
I understand your concern and it is unfortunate that apparently you were 'mis-diagnosed' however keep in mind that a person can have more than one disease at a time. Not saying that you do.

Also MS is a manageable disease...I've had it since my mid 20's and I'm now 44 and I work full time, walk, think and speak clearly, etc.... not saying every day is a good day but I have so many good days that it out weighs the bad ones and I injected Copaxone for 3 years and I stopped due to the bumps it left. The drug that you were injecting, Rebif, good grief the main side effect was flu like symptoms each and every time you injected...copax was a breeze other than maybe a little burning and itching at the site and then later on...bumps, icky.

Glad you are doing better....

~Zig
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replied December 22nd, 2008
I am on a different side
I dont want to ramble but I do want to say that I have been to doctors years after years and just reciently told I have MS then went back only to find I have Lime Diasease. But on meds I am not better and just getting worse. I cant walk barley and the pain is hellatious. I have severe migranes and my hips and knees are falling off (at least thats how it feels). I have severe neck and sholder pain and spine pain. My back and spine burns 24/7. I am at the point I dont want to go back to the doctor due to all this confusing babble that the doctors call good care. I think I have MS and just so happen to show up with Lime. I never been to an area with ticks and never been bit by one either. So what am I to do. I dont want to live my life on meds and its hard cause I am a single mother of 4 children under 10, and I cant be high on pain relivers all the time. What should I do? I need to get better but I have always been getting worse. I have all the signs and symptoms of secondary progressive MS just like the doctor first said. Now Lime how is it possible. What should I do.


Thanks for listening.
Concerned and need the enegery
Mother of Four.
Tiffany
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replied August 12th, 2012
Tiffany, don't give up. I have been diagnosed with MS, Relapsing Remitting in 2004. I am now being tested for Lymes disease. I have 3 children (youngest is 16), I refuse to give up. My legs are horrible, I still work for a great company (30/hrs week). I tell my girls everything about what is happening, so they are not afraid. I take them with me to appointments, etc. Please remember that although our legs don't work right, we are still great parents and our children need us. See a doc about pain management. I hope that they will give you something that will not make you a zombie. Please keep trying. There are many diseases out there that mimic MS. Don't give up.
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replied December 22nd, 2008
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A person can have more than one disease. It could be that you have both or the doctor is wrong.

Ask your doctor why he / she now believe it is Lyme and not MS. There has to be a reason why he / she feels this way.

Do you have plaques on your spine and / or brain? If anything, get another opinion...from a reputable MS specialist.

~Zig
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replied January 4th, 2009
Lyme vs MS
Hi tiffmom42005,I have had Chronic Lyme disease for about 6 years now. I was diagnosed in June 2007 by blood test(ELISA and Western Blot) and MRI(have leisons in my white matter in my brain). Was in a wheel chair for a year. I've had numb legs, numb arms and hands, numb spine,face,and my head feels numb sometimes. I am extremely fatigued since the onset of this. Short term Memory is bad. I'll never forget the first time I got the burning sensations in my thighs, I woke out of a sounds sleep and thought someone had put a hot iron on my right thigh. Extreme pain!! My legs, back, spine and arms burn alot. My neurologists says it is pain from nerve damage from the Lyme disease.I am on neuroton for the pain 600mg 5 times a day. It really helps.In June 2007, I Was put on high doses of axomicillin(875mg 4x's a day)They tried doxycycline but I was allergic after 45 days. I was on 7 months of IV rocephin antibiotics. After 4 months on IV rocephin I started to improve and by the six month was walking again I too thought I had MS! But I don't. Now I am back on Amoxicillian(2700mg a day) again and Miocycline 100 mg a day. Still improving, but Lyme never goes away only goes into remission. Still think it must be better than MS diagnoses.Jane
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replied June 12th, 2009
Hi,i have numb face arms and legs most days i also have massive pain in both butocks and down the back of both legs 24-7. Have spent many years travelling to africa, india and thailand. Had mri and ct brain scan in December which come back clear.My short term memory has gone bad and my balance is a bit off. My GP doctor said he thinks i have MS, i think i have Lyme disease. i asked gp if i could have lyme disease he said no because my blood markers would have shown some abnormality. help i'm worried. caz
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replied July 13th, 2009
Lyme disease with me too. Thought I had MS. Well, MS is just "multiple lesions". They don't know what causes it!! So, after 3 years of neurological problems, I finally tested positive for Lyme. I have been poked, prodded, etc etc and nothing was positive (even went to Johns Hopkins) except the ELISA for Lyme (after 3rd try) and then the Western Blot from Igenex Labs, CA. You'll have to research Lyme to see that it is controversial, but it all makes sense to me now. It is really the only answer I have, so I keep a healthy skepticism, but even so, I cannot deny the positive lyme tests. Period. I am so sick for no reason, but Lyme. It is a disease like Syphilis. The bacteria are the same shape - spiral - and they are called spirochetes. Why can't the Lyme spirochete make you just as sick as Syphilis will without antibiotics? Riddle me that, batman.
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replied July 21st, 2009
need encouraging news for my little sister..
last week my sister went blind in one eye. she was told within 2 days after an MRI that she had MS. Several lesions were found in her brain and throat. A week later results of her spinal tap confirmed Lyme Disease. I want to help..Does she have both or is the Lyme disease a culprit causing lesions in the brain? Other family members are gloomy about her prognosis I feel she could get better if treatment for the Lyme disease is started..Should we concentrate on the MS or is that a mistake? She said Johns Hopkins has registered her in their MS department..She lives in rural Maryland and yes ticks lots of them.
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replied July 27th, 2009
If she had Lyme in her spinal tap then get treated for Lyme ASAP in my humble opinion. MS is just short for "multiple lesions" which can be caused by Lyme. Nobody knows what causes MS. Hopkins will not treat for Lyme - they are idiots about Lyme, sorry John Hopkins, but it's true. They are NOT Lyme literate. My friend got treated for MS and it made his Lyme worse! Interferon made it worse, terribly worse!! Steroids made it worse also. He went blind in one eye too. What did they say about her positive spinal?
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replied July 27th, 2009
I forgot to say welcome and I'm sorry she is sick. I get anxious when I see people going through this with no prior knowledge about Lyme and MS. Please take the Lyme disease very very seriously because most doctors are not Lyme Literate and will not take it seriously. Check out the website MedHelp.org. It has a Lyme disease forum that I am on. I can't stress enough how seriously you/she should look into Lyme! I'm not a weirdo who believes anything people tell me. I am a skeptic, but I cannot dismiss the possibility that Lyme disease may in fact be one cause for MS. I have read and researched about this subject until I am blue in the face:) Let me know how she is doing.
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replied July 27th, 2009
Thanks for your knowledge!
She has been put on intraveneous antibiotics and within 2 days is regaining the sight in her eye. Her voice which has been hoarse for years is sounding normal. Her energy level has also dramatically increased! The words 'I feel good' have been heard! WOW! She says that her contact at Johns Hopkins is a "Lyme" doctor and they are treating her for the infection first. How interesting this invading disease is. I live in Florida and we have ticks but our physicians don't view them as a threat...I wonder how long that will last. I believe we have to be our own health advocate in todays healthcare system. I am more informed about Lyme Disease and its effects than most just by a bit of research. It's a shame that the medical community does not want to go out on a limb when things have yet to be proven without any doubt..Sadly how many people suffer from this ignorance. I know in my heart and in my brain my sister will be OK and hopefully because of this correlation of symptoms and diagnosis a another door can be opened for the next patient. Thanks so much for your energy and enlightning information!
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replied July 29th, 2009
You are so welcome! That is wonderful news! I can't believe Johns Hopkins has a Lyme literate doc. They missed mine by a mile. Oh well, at least there is a good doc there now! Take care and stay vigilant with her treatment. It could be a lifelong thing to monitor, but it sounds like she is making an amazing recovery already.
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replied July 29th, 2009
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Hope752 wrote:
MS is just short for "multiple lesions" which can be caused by Lyme. Nobody knows what causes MS.


Hope752,

MS is short for Multiple Sclerosis in which Sclerosis = plaques (lesions).

The exact cause of MS is not known but it is known that some people have the MS gene and something as simple as a virus, toxin, drug will turn that gene on. And not everyone who has MS will have lesions or they will have lesions on their spine but not their brain.

There are several diseases that could cause these lesions / plaques. Migraines, TIA / Stroke, Multiple Sclerosis, Lyme, etc.

Whenever one is in doubt about a diagnosis they should seek a 2nd or 3rd opinion and to learn as much about a disease that they can so he/she will understand and know what questions to ask their respected physician(s).

One should never rush to give a diagnosis without ruling out other potential diseases. With that said, a person can have more than one disease at any given time.

There are specific tests / clinical findings that can lead to a correct dx. May not be a quick answer.

Doctors are not without fault. Sometimes the patient needs to bring info that they found to their doctor. There are always new tests / techniques being developed that he/she may not yet be aware of. A good doctor would welcome such.

Zig
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replied July 31st, 2009
Yes, that's pretty much what I said. I know that MS stands for Multiple Sclerosis, which means multiple plaques. I had the entire MS workup: MRIs brain and c-spine w/ and w/o contrast, lumbar puncture, visual-evoked potentials, auditory brainstem response, electronystagmography - you name it. Thus, I'm painfully aware about all things MS.

My point is, I'm not sure why you are trying to school me? I know what I am talking about, so feel free to say what you disagree with, instead of beating around the bush.

You obviously do not believe in the Lyme diagnosis from reading your posts, and this is the exact reason for our frustration as sufferers with Lyme disease. I've read your posts and they are just watered-down versions of what docs that are not Lyme literate have told me and then brushed me to the side because I have only one lesion on MRI. One doc said MS stands for Multiple Sclerosis - MULTIPLE and since you only have one, you do not have MS. I am fully schooled in the subject of MS and Lyme, so thanks for your concern, but no need to "enlighten me" any further.

Sorry, but you need to research the Lyme controversy and you'll find the reason for my frustration. I apologize in advance if I have misread your intentions.

Sincerely,

Hope
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replied July 31st, 2009
Community Volunteer
Hope752 wrote:
Yes, that's pretty much what I said. I know that MS stands for Multiple Sclerosis, which means multiple plaques. I had the entire MS workup: MRIs brain and c-spine w/ and w/o contrast, lumbar puncture, visual-evoked potentials, auditory brainstem response, electronystagmography - you name it. Thus, I'm painfully aware about all things MS.


This is the general protocol for a neurologist to take when trying to pinpoint or rule out a disease.

Hope752 wrote:
My point is, I'm not sure why you are trying to school me? I know what I am talking about, so feel free to say what you disagree with, instead of beating around the bush.


I never said that I disagree with you. What I did say is that a person can have more than one disease and I will add that some diseases have similar or same symptoms. Therefore tests and process of elimination of other diseases should be ruled out and in some cases that is not easy so a clinical diagnosis is made after a lengthly observation based on symptoms.

Beating around the bush? Yeah, right...

Hope752 wrote:
You obviously do not believe in the Lyme diagnosis from reading your posts, and this is the exact reason for our frustration as sufferers with Lyme disease.


Where did you get the notion that I do not believe in a lyme dx? I know people who have Lyme.

Hope752 wrote:
I've read your posts and they are just watered-down versions of what docs that are not Lyme literate have told me and then brushed me to the side because I have only one lesion on MRI. One doc said MS stands for Multiple Sclerosis - MULTIPLE and since you only have one, you do not have MS.


Watered down versions...Is that the best you can do? Remember you are their employer and they can be released at anytime that you choose. MS dx is not given just on lesion or lesions alone.

If you have read my posts I do say that there are diseases that mimic MS and visa-versa. Doctors are not perfect and neither are tests. It is always a wise move to get a second or third opinion when such a dx is given.

Hope752 wrote:
I am fully schooled in the subject of MS and Lyme, so thanks for your concern, but no need to "enlighten me" any further.


Not much to say here since you are already 'enlightened'

Hope752 wrote:
Sorry, but you need to research the Lyme controversy and you'll find the reason for my frustration. I apologize in advance if I have misread your intentions.


There is always a controversy going on, not just MS / Lyme.

Why not take your fustrations and become a Lyme Disease Advocate...find a way to get the word out to those doctors / staff to what they need to be looking for / latest tests, etc.

Not every doctor is the on the same page when it comes to diseases / disorders. One may be up-to-date on the latest tests / findings while another one totally relies on what he/she learned in school or they pick and choose what they want to use. This is not always the case however it happens.

Best Wishes,

Zig
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replied August 3rd, 2009
A little insight into my frustrations may offer clarity:

1 - a friend was diagnosed with MS at a highly reputable MS clinic based on multiple lesions and neurological symptoms. After the first treatment, his symptoms spiraled into a neurological hell of sorts. It turns out, he has Lyme disease, and the drugs he was given for MS allowed the spirochete (B. Burgdorferi) to run rampant and make him more ill. He would have been much better if he were initially and correctly diagnosed with Lyme and treated with antibiotics. Now, he can barely walk.

2 - When you have someone that posts this:
"Thanks for your knowledge!
She has been put on intraveneous antibiotics and within 2 days is regaining the sight in her eye. Her voice which has been hoarse for years is sounding normal. Her energy level has also dramatically increased! The words 'I feel good' have been heard! WOW! She says that her contact at Johns Hopkins is a "Lyme" doctor and they are treating her for the infection first. How interesting this invading disease is. I live in Florida and we have ticks but our physicians don't view them as a threat...I wonder how long that will last. I believe we have to be our own health advocate in todays healthcare system. I am more informed about Lyme Disease and its effects than most just by a bit of research. It's a shame that the medical community does not want to go out on a limb when things have yet to be proven without any doubt..Sadly how many people suffer from this ignorance. I know in my heart and in my brain my sister will be OK and hopefully because of this correlation of symptoms and diagnosis a another door can be opened for the next patient. Thanks so much for your energy and enlightning information!"

The person needs advice about Lyme, not MS. The first conclusion is often MS (as in this posters case), especially if lesions of the brain are present, and the treatment for MS is horrible for a Lymie. My entire point is that MS has no firm etiology and is a diagnosis of exclusion. Lyme can cause lesions on the brain and can be detected with the correct lab tests, with emphasis on correct. If they treated this woman as an MS patient, they were jeopardizing her chances at recovery from Lyme disease and jeopardizing her health, for that matter. Nobody answered his/her post for what, 6 days? I'm just glad they took the Lyme diagnosis seriously. Your post is meant to be objective, which was your intention, but it is not in my eyes. Or, at minimum, it was not perceived as objective by myself and possibly others. It is swayed toward the diagnosis of MS, in my opinion. One can't fool around with the Lyme diagnosis b/c the % of LLMDs is so small that it gets blown off. I suffered for three years and nobody could give me a diagnosis because all of my symptoms were "MS like", but I had one lesion and a normal lumbar puncture. I was hoping for MS b/c at least I would have a disease process as an answer and start treatment. Instead, they said nothing is wrong and they didn't know why I was in chronic pain and having neurological symptoms.

I guess I can't get past the idea that doctors would rather pin a diagnosis on someone (like MS, Lou Gherig's, Parkinsons, etc) that has no clear etiology. I know people that are diagnosed with MS with no lesions. Whether their diagnosis is correct is beyond me. Lyme disease has a clear etiology - a bacterial infection. The Lyme controversy comes in when you claim "chronic" Lyme disease is causing you grief as most docs don't recognize Lyme as a chronic issue.

Either way, if our debate or difference of perspective allows others to think about the MS vs. Lyme debate more closely, then we have accomplished something positive. I am a Lyme advocate and hope that we can continue to both learn about both illnesses, since Lyme is the "great imitator".

Regards,

Hope
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replied August 4th, 2009
Community Volunteer
Hope752,

Very well put and I agree that there are imitators, Lyme being one of them.

We do have a debate forum here @ eHealth. Smile

Patients need to be aware of their diagnosis, whatever it would be, and empower themselves and ask questions. Get a second or third opinion if that is what they need....

Zig
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replied August 5th, 2009
MS or Lyme?
I have many symptoms similar to both MS & lyme.
I have had 3 negative tests for lyme & i'm waiting to see an immunologist.
Can I just ask, does MS tend to be one sided or equal symptoms on both sides? I alway thought it tended to be mostly on one side on the body, especially in the early stages.
My symptoms are the same both sides.
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replied October 8th, 2011
Experienced User
Hi Middlesizedpanda, Has your doctor also tested you for co-infections? I have had 2 negative lyme borrelia tests, but by chance my doctor tested me for a co-infection, ehrlichia (HME) and it was positive. By the CDC standards which are controversial at this time, I tested negative on the Borrelia, but there were some positive bands that were important to consider. Testing needs to be done from a special lab who specialize in this type of testing and I'd be happy to recommend it privately as we cannot mention those things on this forum. Maybe you could ask your doctor for a copy of the tests you did have done, so you can look if there are ANY bands that were positive and even if it does not qualify by CDC standards, it may qualify by the ILADS standards and be significant. One lyme specialist I just saw in a conference, said the lyme tests can be unreliable up to 50% of the time. Even the co-infections are difficult to test for. There is a huge need for better diagnostic testing as this is a horribly disabling disease in its chronic state. This is why it is so important to see a lyme literate doctor if this is of concern to you. They have to evaluate all the symptoms of the patient not just diagnose from the tests. Once I started learning about it, it all fits. My illness mimics Fibromyalgia following meningitis. I have been suffering 10 years trying to live through the terrible symptoms slowly going downhill. I just recently found out it was lyme. I would encourage anyone with MS diagnosis to also see a lyme literate doctor for a differential. It wouldn't hurt. Lyme can mimic many other diseases, including MS, ALS, Alzheimers & others. That is why patients go so long with being misdiagnosed. And, it can be difficult to tell the difference on a brain scan. Because the tests are not reliable for Lyme, I would not completely rule it out. You're best bet is to find someone who specalizes in it and also can tell the difference between it and MS. My very best wishes to you in finding answers. I only share my story in case it may help. I know it did not answer you question about equal symptoms on each side. I cannot answer that. I just thought you may like to know that even though your tests were negative, it does not rule it out. Actually chronic, latent Lyme is even harder to test for. Never give up searching for the answers and asking questions. Smile
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replied August 6th, 2009
My symptoms are the same on both sides and I have Lyme disease. I think the best thing I can tell you is that it can be both sides or only one for both disease processes - according to what I've read. I'm not a MD, but I think anything goes with Lyme and MS. I could be wrong, so research this yourself as well. It's just been a long time since I've read up on MS symptoms, since I essentially ruled it out a while ago. They are so similar is why I'm inclined to say both.

However, thinking about lesions, one could see how one side of the body could be affected according to where the MS lesion is in the brain? But, there are MS'ers that have symptoms on both sides. They possibly have lesions on both sides, and I don't think they have ever really traced the cause of a symptom back to one lesion. I believe that in both diseases, anything goes, or never say never.

On the negative tests for Lyme, I also had 3 negative tests, until Johns Hopkins got a positive screening (ELISA). They did a Western Blot and it was negative, so they didn't even give any weight to the idea of Lyme disease because they use the old, faulty, criteria for diagnosing and testing for Lyme. You need to be tested by a Lyme literate Lab. The best one is in CA - Igenex. I sent my bloodwork there and bam, CDC positive for active Lyme disease. They use different criteria and data on your labwork. As far as I'm concerned, it's worth every cent I paid. (Most insurances don't pay the full amt. and they don't bill - you have to).

In a nutshell, keep both in mind. Get the work-up for both, but MS is much more accepted in the medical community than Lyme, so be prepared for many naysayers. They'll brush you off re: Lyme disease. You can find some good info on MedHelp too. There is a Lyme and MS forum on that site. Take care and hope you feel better:)
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replied September 5th, 2009
Hello, my name is Chelsae Dumbauld and I am participating in the National MS Society Bike Event. I plan to ride 25 miles or more in order to raise money for people with MS. My goal is to raise at least $200, but more would be wonderful! Please visit my page here:

http://main.nationalmssociety.org/site/TR/ Bike/NCTBikeEvents?px=6986657&pg=personal& fr_id=10800
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