hi,

have been married for over a year and we are just trying for a baby. we just realize that we are AS and SC. my question is this, what options do we have opened to us having children
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replied July 8th, 2012
Especially eHealthy
folarin,

The genotypes of sickle cell disease (anemia) do not have anything to do with the actual process of conception. What it does have to do with is: what genotype the children will be (the odds that they will not have the disease, will be a carrier, or will have the disease).

However, I am not sure what you mean by SC. The usual abbreviations of the genotypes in sickle cell are:

AA - Normal. The person has two normal hemoglobin genes.

AS - Carrier. The person has one normal and one abnormal hemoglobin gene. Thus they are considered sickle cell trait or carriers.

SS - Disease. This person has two abnormal hemoglobin genes. This person will have sickle cell disease.


Using the above notations, this is Genetics 101 in a nutshell.

1. Two AA parents: All children will also be AA. All children will be normal.

2. Two SS parents: All children will also be SS. All children will have sickle cell disease.

3. One parent AA, one parent SS: All of the children will be AS, all will be carriers. There is no possibility of having any normal (AA) children or children with the disease (SS).

4. One parent AA, one parent AS: Half of the children (2 out of 4, or 50%) will be AA and the other half will be AS. That is half of the children will have normal hemoglobin and half will be carriers. It is not possible to have children with the disease (SS).

5. One parent SS, one parent AS: Half of the children will be AS and half will be SS. That is half of the children will be carriers and half of the children will have the disease. It is not possible to produce any normal (AA) children.

6. Both parents AS: Here, one fourth of the children will be normal (AA), half will be carriers (AS), and one fourth will have the disease (SS).



Of course, the above are the odds of having these genotypes, when a whole population is looked at. What a child actual ends up having depends upon what genes they actually get from each parent.


You should sit down with a geneticist and discuss all of your options. Genetics is often difficult to understand. So, it would be best to speak with someone, face to face, so that all of your questions can be answered.

Good luck.
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replied May 20th, 2013
Just saw this response to the question asked and I'm a tad disappointed this was all the answer Folarin got.There's a genotype called SC,and the people affected are carriers of the sickle cell trait too.Please read up and help people get answers not leave confused.
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replied May 5th, 2014
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iT DEPENDS WHAT PART OF the world you are in. There is a procedure called Pre Implantation Genetic Diagnostic (Think IVF) but the fertilised eggs are screened for the genotype before being transferred into the woman and only non sickle ones are placed in her womb.

You could also check while pregnant for the foetus' genotype but unless you are willing to abort a baby if it has the disease, there is no point due to the risk involved.

Thats the only medical option I know short of taking a chance and seeing if you child carries the trait.
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