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Danish Christian Patient told to remove his cross.

I arrived at the Danish hospital with broken bones, was there 10 days waiting for bone operation.

At a Danish univercity hospital in Copenhagen area the docter told me to remove my cross neclace or I would be treated badly. The doctor later returned to check me. And told me again: You have to remove your cross or you will be treated badly.

The next day I was in bath and was told to ring the bell when finished. When I rang the bell nobody came. I rang the bell repeatedly for 30 minutes before somebody came.

For a few days I continued to ask to see the X-rays images, but nobody had time to show me or I was told that I could not understand them.

I had a another cross placed close to my bed. Then a nurse asked: "Who put a cross there". Its mine, I answered. "Why did you put it there" the nurse asked. Then I moved close to my head and asked the over patients: Does anyone have something against this cross being here?. Another patient answered: "We did not notice it.".

After a few days a doctor told the nurse that my broken bones needed cold ice, to lower the temperature, so an operation could take place. The doctor had to raise his voice to make the nurses help me.

After this touch incident, I wrote a complain to the hospital and one year later they answered that they did not remember.

Am I the only patient being discriminated for wearing a cross?
What right does public hospital hold to discriminate its patients?
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replied July 21st, 2012
Errata: "Then I moved close to my head" should be "Then she moved close to my head"
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replied December 18th, 2012
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http://www.teol.ku.dk/ceit/religare/Danish _Report_Final_2012.pdf/

On pages 117 & 118 this report explains that Lutheran is the generally accepted religion in Denmark, but in 2009 the hospitals got together and created a task force of sorts that involved the United States. As their (US) insistance, there were stipulations about religious freedom, so this is new to Denmark. It's worth checking out a country's culture (even the details you think you'll never need to know) before you go there. Hope your wounds healed. Smile
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replied December 18th, 2012
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According to a report I just read online, Lutheran is the religion of Denmark.

In 2009, the hospital in Copenhagen created a task-force for reconstruction of the policies on patient care. Among those countries included in the task force was the United States. Members from the US insisted on policies of religious freedom and freedom of expression, so Denmark is just recently (3 years) learning to be comfortable with it.
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