Medical Questions > Nutrition > Nutrition Forum

Cream in raw milk ?

User Profile
I drink raw, whole milk with my cereal in order to have a healthy source of pro-biotics and nutrients and vitamins. The cream separates from the milk and floats to the top. Sometimes I'll skim the cream off the top and dump it in the sink, sometimes I can't be bothered to do that and just mix it back into the milk. I exercise every day and stay away from junk food most of the time and have a standard body type.

Should I be removing the cream every time? Is it bad for my heart or vascular system or something to be ingesting that cream? When I remove the cream, am I removing most of the nutrients and pro-biotics of the milk?

Thanks in advance for any help!

[Raw Milk] = Milk straight from the cow. No pasteurization, no homogenization. The raw milk cow is raised in a clean, hygienically sane environment, so pathogens are not an issue as would normally be the case with a standard filthy cramped industrialized farm setup. Because raw milk is not cooked to kill off pathogens, all the vitamins and nutrients stay intact and aren't denatured.
Did you find this post helpful?
|

User Profile
replied December 6th, 2009
Supporter
First, I'd suggest that you look into the science again of the risk of bacterial infection before drinking raw, unpasteurized milk. People who drink raw milk tend to make three arguments against pasteurization:

1) pasteurized milk changes the nutrients
2) pasteurization destroys enzymes and hormones
3) the process destroys healthy bacteria

Science tends to contest each of these points (http://news.cals.wisc.edu/newsDisplay.asp ?id=1870) and milk, like many other foods and the environment around us, contains bacteria which can be harmful...or can carry viruses which are passed on to humans. Although pasteurization does destroy some bacteria which may be healthful, the benefit gained by destruction of harmful bacteria and viruses outweighs the disadvantages.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied December 6th, 2009
Extremely eHealthy
I'm with rooted on this. Pasturization doesn't heat milk to the point of alterring the proteins or vitimins. Back when pasturization studies were done there wasn't a lot of interrest in pro-biotics but as I understand the pasteurization process they would survive as well. There are farms that add supplements to milk during pasteurization to enhance shelf-life but the FDA approves the process so there's nothing inherently dangerous in those chemicals.

The cream from Raw milk isn't any less dangerous than the milk itself but it's high in milkfat which isn't doing you any favors. If you're health conscious it would be wise to get rid of it.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied January 22nd, 2011
Pasteurization or any type of cooking denatures proteins and most water soluble nutrients are destroyed - that's common knowledge in the biochemical world. Milk fat on the other hand contains a great amount nutrients. Many cultures including the Masaai have consumed it for hundreds of years with a far lower incidence of obesity and heart disease than all other cultures on "low fat diets." Low fat diets kill. Get the facts.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied May 16th, 2013
making butter from raw milk
I am so sad you have thrown that precious cream down the sink! Beat it with a mixer past the whipped cream stage,and eventually it will separate into butter and buttermilk. Use the buttermilk for pancakes, or whatever. Cream up the butter in a bowl with the back of a spoon until all the buttermilk is extracted. Add a little salt, and you'll never want to eat anything else ever again!
|
Did you find this post helpful?
Must Read
What is the medical definition of obesity? How is obesity different than being overweight. Basic medical facts on obesity here....
We review the simple cause of obesity here, and help you evaluate whether or not you are at risk of becoming obese. ...
Click here for basic signs of weight gain, and information on when to seek medical help if you think that you are becoming overweight....