Had a cat scan ordered by urologist and I picked up my report. Called the doctor but apparently he is on vacation and nurse said she couldn't talk about it until the doctor signs off on it - which means a long wait for me.

What do the following mean? Can any of those be attributed to blood in urine? Also, the technician who did my scat scan only did it WITH contrast (he said that the prescription aid with oral and iv contast -- not with and without).

There is homogeneous attenuation of the liver parenchyma without a focal lesion.
There are duplicated collecting systems bilaterally with duplication of the ureters. There is mild bilateral upper pole cortical thinning.
There is a stable mildly prominent right lower quadrant lymph node.
Evaluation of the pelvis reveals the bladder to be collapsed.
There is a dominant right ovarian follicle.
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replied January 12th, 2012
Especially eHealthy
concerned_about,

I may be able to help with the terminology.

"There is homogeneous attenuation of the liver parenchyma without a focal lesion."
>> The liver tissue looks the same throughout, without any sign of tumors, cyts, or masses.


"There are duplicated collecting systems bilaterally with duplication of the ureters. There is mild bilateral upper pole cortical thinning."
>> You have a congenital anomaly, in which your have two ureters on both sides, coming from both kidneys. Also, in the upper portion of the kidneys, the outer layer, the cortex, is thinned. This could be from a problem arising from your congenital anomaly.


"There is a stable mildly prominent right lower quadrant lymph node."
>> You have an enlarged lymph node in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen.


"Evaluation of the pelvis reveals the bladder to be collapsed."
>> Your bladder was empty during this test.


"There is a dominant right ovarian follicle."
>> When you ovulated this month, the egg came from the right ovary.


The following is some information about duplication of the renal collecting system:

Duplication of the renal collecting system is the most common upper urinary tract anomaly, occurring in 1/125 or 0.8% of a nonselected population. The anomaly is identified with a female-to-male ratio of 1.6:1, or 62% female. Unilateral duplication occurs about six times more often than bilateral duplication. In double ureters, the two orifices into the bladder are characteristically inverted in relation to the renal collecting systems they drain. The orifice to the lower pole ureter occupies the more cranial and lateral position, and that of the upper pole ureter has a caudal and medial position. This relationship is so consistent that it has been termed the Weigert-Meyer law. Rare exceptions to the Weigert-Meyer law have been observed, in which the upper pole orifice is cranial.

* Complications of Duplex Systems
There are several complications frequently associated with duplex systems including:
>> vesicoureteral reflux (Lower Pole)
>> hydronephrosis
>> ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction (Upper Pole)
>> ureteroceles (at bladder junction)


If you do have some obstruction at the ureteropelvic junction, that could account for the cortical thinning seen in the upper pole of the kidneys.


This anomaly of the collection system could be causing hematuria. But, this is why you need to discuss the findings of the study with your physician. All findings need to be correlated with your history, symptoms, and physical exam.

Good luck.
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replied January 17th, 2012
Thanks.

How do I know for sure whether a collapsed bladder on the report means that my bladder was empty or if it is the same thing as a prolapsed bladder? When I googled it, those were used interchangeably at times.
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replied January 17th, 2012
and is an enlarged lymph node something of a concern? I remember I had that show up on a cat scan I had done years ago too.
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