I just started the hypoglycemic diet yesterday all day and continuing today. I feel there is a giant lethargic fog lifted for the first time in years but, I can't seem to bring my sugar level back up to normal range. I am still feeling the pressure dizzy feeling and my blood sugar is low. I was very shaky this morning and couldn't seem to raise my sugar level.
What do I do? I need my sugar level up some here. Please any advise quick I will love to hear.
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replied February 16th, 2009
it will take patience...
I just read "Hypoglycemia: The Classic Healthcare Handbook" by Jeraldine Saunders and Dr. Harvey M. Ross. I take everything I read about hypoglycemia with a grain of salt because there is so much contradiction, but they indicated that there are 3 phases you will experience as you go on the diet. They could each last a month or two and you could feel worse before you feel better. It will take patience, but stick with it. For me, I experienced the same things you describe, and I found that if I make sure to eat every 3 hours a lot of the symptoms go away. I have a tendency though to wake up and reach for my laptop to check email, and the next thing I know it is after 12pm and I'm on ehealthforum and haven't eaten yet Smile.

I'd suggest reading all that you can but being wary of false truths. The more you read the easier it is to see what is false. Where did you get your diet? The book I mentioned has some recipes but nothing to write home about. I found a diet online yesterday that was terrible. Half the things on it I know I shouldn't eat. Also it recommended using artificial sweetener and I don't trust that junk. I was diagnosed with the glucose tolerance test but haven't gotten to a specialist yet (no insurance). I'm figuring it out on my own, but a specific diet would be really helpful if you have one. Certain things I can't figure out. Like popcorn, polenta, barley groats, etc. Are those ok? Beer seems to be bad (too bad I work at a brewpub and get free drafts) but wine is ok maybe in my experience. Twinkies are obviously bad, but there are a lot of grey areas. The problem is, as I think I can tell and also the book I mentioned said, you feel the effects of a particular food up to 3 days after you ate it. And it is different for everyone. Also I'm still trying to figure out the different variations on hypoglycemia. I think I have reactive hypoglycemia, but my doctor didn't give me any specifics. I hope this wasn't more confusion than help, haha. I'd be interested to hear about your progress and diet. Good luck!
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replied March 3rd, 2009
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Did you guys check out my diet on this forum? Lots of people have had great success with it.
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replied March 3rd, 2009
thanks!
Thanks Stan! That is GREAT. I've randomly figured out a couple things that work well for me that you mentioned, like hard boiled eggs and unsweetened almond milk but still have some things I was wondering. This helps a lot.

I tried to find Ezekial bread actually and couldn't, which is weird because I live in Taos, NM which is a total hippie mecca. We do have a great selection of bins of bulk stuff at our grocery store and I've been eating a lot of nuts and stuff from that. I thought that maybe I could eat some whole grain stuff, like tortilla wraps, which I probably eat about twice a day and that seems to be ok. I made a wrap with preservative free deli ham, cheese, kimchee (thank god spicy stuff seems to be ok for me) and veggies. I think that whole wheat pasta was no good though. Polenta too and you are the first person who came out and said corn is bad. I couldn't find an answer to that one until now. Do you ever eat any other grain products besides the Ezekiel brand? I don't eat bread any more but I was wondering about maybe whole grain rice. I used to make sushi at home but I can't figure out a way around the rice factor.

I have a juicer and used to make carrot/apple/wheatgrass juice before I knew I had this but now I've been avoiding juice. Do you think that would be ok if I made it myself? I guess fruit is naturally so sweet that even 100% real juice in the store is too sweet. I wondered if I could make something at home that would be ok. When I get things with moderate amounts of sugar, like the deli meat, tomato juice, etc. I try to keep it under 5 grams and that seems to be ok. But then again its hard to tell if you forget what "good" feels like.

I don't think I have this as severe as some people, especially when it comes to WHAT I eat. It seems to be very important that I eat every 3 hours though. I feel better when I get up and eat a small amount of barely sweetened granola with flax seeds and hemp (oil maybe?) which was from the bulk bins I mentioned. I mix in walnuts, more flax seeds, and bran and use unsweetened almond milk. I wonder if the granola is not as good as I think though. I often eat a hard boiled egg with this too. I experimented a little with low-sugar baby food (you should have seen me reading all the labels in the baby food isle, haha). I thought maybe if I felt really shitty it might help me feel better quickly but I think it had too much sugar.

Any thoughts on my diet? How did you figure yours out? Since I found out in December that what I had after 10 years of being told I had low blood pressure was hypoglycemia, learning about it has pretty much been my hobby. The thing that sucks the most is that I bartend at a brewpub and get a free pint 4 days a week and can't drink it now! Ugh! Do you drink any alcohol now that you are pretty stable? I think wine seems to be better but I'm still avoiding it. Well, that's enough for now. Thanks for posting. I'm so glad I found your diet.
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replied March 4th, 2009
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Hmmm, that is odd. Ezekiel is pretty common now at most major supermarkets even. I find it all over the place. Don't eat that ham. I'm glad you noticed there's sugar in it, but even a teeny amount is NOT good. You should avoid it entirely. Any type of ham has some form of sugar in it. Also, be careful of root vegetables, as I mention. I know Kimchee has some carrots in it at times. I currently only eat Ezekiel products, mainly because they're already sprouted, I don't feel like sprouting myself, and it's cheaper. Getting bulk grains that are the good quality kind and sprouting them is a pain. Bitter berry juice seems to be okay in small quantities, especially straight cranberry juice, NOT cocktails. I would say it seems like you're eating a few things you shouldn't be eating. I know from experience that every hypoglycemia book out there is wrong in some way, none of them give you the whole picture nor did any of them provide me with proper eating habits and ideas. Hypoglycemia for Dummies, for example, made me want to die. Terrible book. After struggling through those books I weeded through thier information and was able to isolate the best things for ANY hypoglycemic. After turning my body into a living lab, I figured out the best diet. It took me about 5 1/2 years to get better, but that also factors in the time wasted with books like Dummies. Once I got the right diet, I would say it took me approximately 6 months to be 100% and then some better. Let me know if you have any questions.
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replied March 14th, 2009
Re: thanks!
Hey there, Keb

I live in Taos county as well, on the other side of Three peaks in the Star Earthship community (Carson). Hope to talk soon, but I am running out the door. Hope your having a great day!

Patrick
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replied May 1st, 2009
Hypoglycemic awareness!
Why is it that (non-diabetics with hypoglycemia) are not treated with the same degree of concern as (diabetics that develop hypoglycemia) through insulin?
We all suffer the same low blood sugar symptoms. Without taking food in short order, we could go into a coma and die, since our organs don't seem to replenish the stored sugar that our body requires.
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replied May 1st, 2009
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It's because of the vast difference in ways it manifests. Diabetes has a clear diagnosis and it's treated through money and doctor visits. Only the hypoglycemic can help themselves in the end, and you can't make much money off of that.
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replied May 2nd, 2009
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Sometimes if you're very low you can resort to fast carbohydrates. Yes normally you should consume proteins, a piece of cheese, a slice of hard boiled egg, 1 oz of meat. But if you're very low and can't raise your blood sugar carbohydrates alone might help.

The problem is that I have seen people trying to use carbohydrates to raise their low blood sugar by eating a whole loaf of bread, a whole packet of biscuits, a whole bottle of juice, half a jar of jam. Of course you will have a pretty bad rebound effect half an hour later.


1 gram of sugar raise blood sugar level 4 points. So when you have low blood sugar 10 grams of carbohydrates is all you need to bring blooo sugar up to normal levels without spiking them. Not 50 grams, not a whole bottle of juice.
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replied May 2nd, 2009
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Stan wrote:
Hypoglycemia for Dummies, for example, made me want to die. Terrible book. After struggling through those books I weeded through thier information and was able to isolate the best things for ANY hypoglycemic.


Can you explain what wrong ideas the book promote.
Also can you list other books about hypoglycemia to stay away from and why?
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replied May 2nd, 2009
glycemic index
I recently read the Glycemic Revolution and it's companion book that was a little handbook to 100 low glycemic foods. It explains some interesting things from a molecular level. For example, yogurt has 2 kinds of sugar, (lactose and galactose I think) that compete for absorption. This slows down how fast this food affects your blood sugar thus making it low glycemic. I was going by sugar content alone for a while. I feel a lot better now that I am eating a more balanced diet. Also I was surprised to learn that fructose is a lower glycemic sugar than others and many fruits are ok. I had stopped eating fruits entirely and I think this had the biggest impact on my diet. I'd recommend looking into the Glycemic Index and why exactly certain foods are rated low. I found a little bit out about it online but this book helped me understand what the values actually mean.
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replied May 2nd, 2009
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Niklas89 wrote:

Can you explain what wrong ideas the book promote.
Also can you list other books about hypoglycemia to stay away from and why?


I unfortunately don't have it in front of me anymore because I got rid of it long ago, but there were many dietary recommendations in there that are not wise to follow. It has some good features, like the symptom list, but the food recommendations were off-base in certain ways. All the books I read had their good points and bad points:

1. Hypoglycemia: A New Approach is probably the best, it has some errors in it, but it's better than most.

2. Sugar Blues is a cool book about the history of sugar and its usage (pretty shocking in many cases), but it doens't really give any dietary information.

3. Body Mind Sugar is a good one too, but it focuses mainly on alcoholism and such near the end, which though I get in connection to hypoglycemia, overall it focuses on this too much and doesn't give enough information on proper eating and such.

4. The Do's and Don'ts of Hypoglycemia is probably the worst out of all of them, absolutely terrible. The dietary information is minimal and hardly gives you a clue of what you should do and she focuses too much on issues that are so childish and pointless they seem more like ways to get a higher page count. I remember some of the lines being like 'DO check the floor for puddles when you go to the gym so you don't slip'. Seriously?

5. Hypoglycemia is a nother good one (by Saunders), but it has some misinformation in it. Overall it's probably one of the better ones, right up there with the New Approach.
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replied May 15th, 2009
Hey Stan, is the book in your list at #1 called Hypglycemia: a Better Approach? I don't see anything listed on Amazon for "A New Approach"

Thanks
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replied May 15th, 2009
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Re: glycemic index
keb wrote:
Also I was surprised to learn that fructose is a lower glycemic sugar than others and many fruits are ok. I had stopped eating fruits entirely and I think this had the biggest impact on my diet. I'd recommend looking into the Glycemic Index and why exactly certain foods are rated low. I found a little bit out about it online but this book helped me understand what the values actually mean.


Yes but fruits are 30 to 50% glucose
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replied May 16th, 2009
I can eat them just fine though and that's all that matters. Higher fiber ones are best, particularly apples. That is commonly known.
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replied May 16th, 2009
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oh dear
diabetes & blood sugar, high or low is a thyroid related issue. Click my username picture "look behind the 8 ball", then profile, then posts, read them study the suggested searches & sites. Help yourselves & i'll help you if you want, all FREE, How silly am i? i just want to help people! what a nut, who would want to do that?! MAYBE SOMEONE WHO GENUINELY CARES?
God bless.
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replied May 16th, 2009
This is ridiculous. I'm leaving this forum.
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replied May 16th, 2009
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stan
So what your saying is the medical industry want to maintain an illness like diabetes so they can make money out of it instead of helping people return to pre diabetes state! Typical!
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replied May 16th, 2009
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I'm not saying they're doing that, I'm saying that because of how the medical industry is generally run here, it isn't easy to market something for hypoglycemia, because there's nothing to market. No help centers, whatever. You have to do most of it yourself. Niklas, though fruits have sugar in them, fructose does not activate insulin the same for them as it does white flours, simple sugars, bananas, or whatever. I forget why, I read it in a medical article awhile ago. But, basically, it explains why many hypoglycemics don't have much trouble eating them.
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