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Can inguinal hernia surgery lead to thyroid disorder?

I had successful surgery a year ago for an inguinal hernia. I was otherwise in overall very good health and fit for a 55 yoa male.

Here is where my curiosity lies: About one month after my surgery in Feb. 2011, I was diagnosed with a thyroid disorder (Hyper). I find it very questionable and coincidental that out of no where the thyroid condition appeared! Could it be related to my surgery? The surgeon did use mesh for the repair.

Anyone have similar circumstances? I would really like to know. This has me scratching my head! Confused

Thanks for any responses.
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First Helper User Profile MyrahU
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replied February 16th, 2012
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I don't think the two are connected. I don't see how they could be. You could ask your endocrinologist about it, just in case (I personally think that Hyperthyroidism is too complex for a regular doctor to treat, I recommend a specialist).

Often, thyroid disorders go unnoticed for a while, sometimes months or years, with only subtle symptoms. This could have been going on before your surgery even. What symptoms do you have? Muscle aches, insomnia, weight loss, bulging eyes, anything? Or did it just show up on a blood test? Also, did they test for antithyroid antibodies to see if you have Grave's disease (which means that it is autoimmune).

Again, consult with your endocrinologist, but I think the systems are too different and I think if surgery in general could cause thyroid disorders, it would be pretty well-known and common.
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Users who thank MyrahU for this post: 73NovaGuy 

replied February 17th, 2012
Thanks MyrahU.
Actually, I screwed up. I am Hypo not Hyper. I have about half of the common listed symptoms. I have skin twitch under left eye, lack of energy, muscle aches, foggy headed and now insomnia (as of about 2 months ago).
All of this came on ONE MONTH after my surgery.
Yes, I had my blood tested for Thyroid and Vitiman D levels. My thyroid was at 11. Now it is about 5-6. It should be between 2-4. I have been on meds for 10 months now but honestly, I don't see much improvement with my symtoms. Yes, I can go 3 to 4 days feeling great then Wham - I'm feeling like I'm 95 years old. This cycle repeats itself.
I am due pretty soon for another blood draw/analysis so I'll see where my level is then. I did see an endocrinologist early on because my Doc found a very small nodule. The endocrinologist did a scan and due to it being the size of less than 1 cm., it was considered of no importance at this time.
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replied February 20th, 2012
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Has your TSH ever been in the target range? That will be the real test of if that will be the solution to your problem. Having hypothyroidism, especially for months at a time, can be very draining. I think sometimes it takes a few months of being in the target TSH range before a person can feel normal again.

Make sure you are taking your medication at the same time every day, on an empty stomach, at least a half hour to an hour before eating (before breakfast is usually best), and not within four hours of any calcium or iron supplements or any antacids (those can inhibit absorption of your medication).

Also, most thyroid nodules are benign, but it's always a good idea to keep an eye on them with scans to make sure they aren't growing. I've heard that it's hard to biopsy ones that are smaller than 1 cm accurately, unfortunately. Just don't let them dismiss it outright is all. I would also ask if you should have a test for what is called Hashimoto's, which is a autoimmune cause of hypothyroidism. It can also be associated with nodules. It's a simple blood test to check for it.

If you have more questions, feel free to re-post.
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Users who thank MyrahU for this post: 73NovaGuy 

replied February 21st, 2012
Thanks again, MyrahU. What is TSH? I'm also going to request a blood test for "Low T" - for my age and have symptoms that match that as well.

Yes, I have been taking my meds in your suggested method. Thanks.
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replied February 25th, 2012
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TSH is Thyroid Stimulating Hormone. It has an *inverse* relationship to thyroid hormone levels produced by your thyroid gland. It's basically your brain asking your thyroid for more thyroid hormone. So when TSH is low, your thyroid hormone levels are high and vice versa. If TSH gets too low, a person is said to be hyperthyroid and if TSH is too high, that's hypothyroidism. I hope that clears things up. Doctors don't always explain it very well, I've noticed.

I don't know much about "low-t" but perhaps some of your symptoms are that or they could be more of the hypothyroidism (things like low energy, low sex drive, etc can be hypothyroidism). But you could always ask your doctor about it and see. Or you could wait and see how you feel after a couple of months with your TSH in the normal range.
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replied February 27th, 2012
Thanks again, MyrahU. Your replies have been right on point!
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