Hey everyone,
I finally decided to try botox in my jaw. My main problem is clenching and I've tried so many things that haven't helped. Botox was very costly(over 1k) but at this point I'd pay everything I have to get rid of the pain and prevent me from clenching at nighttime. Plus, this dentist has done these injections many times so I felt sometimes it's better to pay more for a qualified person. It's only been 7 hrs since the injections but I'll let you guys know if my jaw starts feeling better.

Tmjfighter
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replied April 25th, 2008
Extremely eHealthy
i wish you suoodnt have dont this---in about 5 months you are gonna have to do it again and it doesnt fix the problem
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replied April 25th, 2008
botox can actually solve the problem
Hi,
I'm not sure what you have read but after reading(for days) about botox online for tmj and speaking with a few doctors, botox in the jaw CAN actually solve the problem. My problem is clenching, which has put so much pressure on my jaw and muscles in my face. Botox can actually STOP the clenching not just the pain, which totally solves my problem. Having to go back in 4-5 months is a small price to pay for the relief I will have if this works. Plus, I have heard that some people do not need to go back again or can go longer than the 4-5 months since the muscles lose their memory with clenching. I mean I've been clenching for years now and nothing has worked. I went to a NMD and they said it wouldn't help in my case. Anything that stops my clenching while I sleep solves my problem.

Tmjfighter
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replied April 25th, 2008
Extremely eHealthy
well you will be back and spending a lot of money on it and no it wont solve anything--esp if there is a structural problem. this is not stuff that ive read ---its stuff that my doctor has given me info on
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replied April 25th, 2008
i think we have a different idea of what we're solving
Yes, if my teeth are misaligned, botox will not fix my bite(if this is what you mean by structural problem). My personal problem is clenching, which is causing me headaches and jaw pain. I have seen a NMD(they said in my case it would not help me), had numerous biteplates, tried muscle relaxers, done 4 months of acupuncture, and nothing has stopped me permanently from clenching. Botox has been proven to stop clenching at least for the time it stays in my body, so how can this not solve anything? They're doing clinical trials on it right now. I've thrown away thousands on things that didn't work so to actually find something that works(stops my clenching), I would pay anything for it.

Tmjfighter
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replied April 25th, 2008
Extremely eHealthy
did they say why it wouldnt work. there are other things that would work and stop you from clenching. it isnt stoping you from clenching---you dont feel the effects. and not only that no matter how much botox you have in you you will still have tmd
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replied September 29th, 2012
Botox for TMJ and bruxism
TMJfighter...good for you. TMJ World is either misinformed and or his dentist is. Yes it does reduce bruxism, thus reduces wear of enamel (costly to fix). You are proactive. Of course it may need to be re-treated. Your logic is spot on and I wish you much success. I wonder if TMJ World won't but a car because you fill it up with gas one week, you'll just have to do it again later. One of you is glass half full perspective.

As a dental lecturer of Botox for TMJ pain I can tell you that it can OFTEN save you more expensive dental treatment from cracked teeth, enamel wear, chronic headaches, sick days from work, etc. This is a stressful world and your investment brings you comfort and often times lowers your overall dental costs.

I certainly hope that the public is smart enough to know that we dentists do not have the same training or experience.

I have had 3 suicidal chronic pain patients in my career get relief from Botox that drugs, and tons of medical and dental treatment failed to help. Done correctly, this absolutely works exceptionally well.
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replied October 2nd, 2012
I have had Botox in my jaw twice now. I have not seen any reduction in pain but my massage therapist has noticed my muscles are less tense. My problem is clenching as well. I wanted to reply to tell you that $1000 is way to much to pay! I get mine done by a professional cosmetic doctor. She charges me $400 per treatment and I submit this to my insurance for coverage. Luckily I am coved for this as its a medical prescription treatment. I am hoping that repeat treatments will reduce the pain.
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replied October 3rd, 2012
Botox & Dysport have to be done correctly.
Dear Nikki

Sounds like you might be one of those fortunate to have a Flex plan. I have taught several plastic surgeons and medical doctors how to properly dose and inject Botox and Dysport. I know my fees are NOT $1000 but I can tell you that the amount of formal education in head and neck anatomy that physicians get is substantially less than the training dentists get. Additionally, grinding, clenching, etc are DENTAL related problems. Sadly in today's economy, patient's are not as cross referred as they used to be.

I actually now teach my courses on Botox/Dysport and dermal fillers to dentists and it is probably the best "pain relief" method I have seen in 25 years of practice. While there are more expensive treatment options, I've yet to find a better one, when done correctly.

I guess Nikki, I took the long road to say that not all doctors have the same skills, experience, training or knowledge. Kind of like assuming all pro baseball players are equally talented and sadly I learned AGAIN, that those rules do not apply to my Angels:((((
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replied October 15th, 2012
Everyone with TMJ and bruxism issues should be getting their magnesium levels checked. One of the most common symptoms of a magnesium deficiency is nighttime tooth grinding and/or clenching along with sound/noise intolerance and inability to sleep through the night (different from insomnia). Not all of these symptoms need to be present at the same time.

A magnesium deficiency can, in fact, be the underlying cause of bruxism and supplementation a much more effective and means to addressing the symptoms.
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replied October 16th, 2012
Experienced User
Grinding and clenching, while involving the teeth, are not caused by the teeth. They are a parasomnia, related to microarousals which occur during normal sleep. Excessive clenching and grinding may just be individual variants of this very normal muscle activity, or there may be some other underlying condition.... the science has not shown any definitive relationship at this point.
Botox can be very useful for the hyperactivity of the masseters and temporalis ( and other muscles, too ), and would be a good option if all other less invasive avenues have been pursued. It also works with dystonias. However, it is generally not a long term fix, and very often must be redone in 3 - 6 months. While this does not hold true for every single case, it is more the norm than the exception.
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replied October 16th, 2012
There is science to support magnesium
Science has shown a significant link between magnesium deficiencies and bruxism depending on where you are looking (a few examples below and there are more out there if you are looking). I have personally found my tooth clenching to disappear with magnesium supplementation. It may not be the underlying cause for everyone's bruxism but it may be significant...time will tell.

"Magnesium-deficient diet is said to cause frequent teeth grinding in both sleeping and awake pigs (cf. Lehvila, 1994, p. 219). In humans, the suggested treatment involves magnesium supplements. According to Ploceniak (1990), for instance, prolonged magnesium administration nearly always provides a cure for bruxism. This confirms the earlier report of Lehvila (1974), which claimed remarkable reductions (and sometimes even disappearance) in the frequency and duration of grinding episodes in six patients who took, once a day, a tablet of assorted vitamins and minerals (which included 25 mg {in children} or 100 mg {in adults} of magnesium), for at least five weeks. When the supplements intake stopped, the symptoms returned."
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replied October 16th, 2012
Experienced User
There are reports, and then there is science. The one major caveat for most bruxism studies is how they define and measure sleep bruxism. ( Most are done VERY poorly!) The next is that proper scientific study involves large numbers of participants, and the study is double blinded and placebo controlled. This is not to say that reports like the one you mentioned are not useful, they are the beginning of the scientific process....... the reason a treatment would be studied in the first place. As of yet, there is no definitive "cause" for bruxism. We do know that stress can be a major modifier of the bruxism event, though.
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replied October 16th, 2012
Thanks for your thoughtful response Hounder...
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replied October 17th, 2012
botox
Did it help? I have an appointment to get botox injections soon. I've tried everything and my problem is tensing (I don't clench my teeth, but I hold my jaw such that it is always tense). Please let me know if this worked for you. If this doesn't work for me I'm going for surgery. I can't live like this anymore.
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replied October 26th, 2012
Glad to see a more recent post. I had Botox starting this summer. Clenching is my primary problem. I had cracked a molar, broken out fillings, etc. I'd tried all the orthodontic/dental options short of surgery. I did some research and decided to try Botox to temporarily relieve the pain. It did just that. For four months, I had basically no TMJ pain. No teeth problems. After four months, the pain and teeth problems returned like clockwork.

I also went to a plastic surgeon's office, and found they did an excellent job. The treatment was about $500. I will be doing it again. It's well worth it in my book, since nothing else worked. It also made my jaw less swollen looking, so that was an added bonus for me. If I hadn't liked it, the good thing about it being temporary is that I could have just opted not to do it again.
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