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Botox for masseter hypertrophy

Does anyone have any recommendations for botox , specifically for masseter hypertrophy resulting from TMJ?
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replied November 28th, 2008
Supporter
Botox has not been approved by the FDA for use in TMJ disorders. Used in small doses, Botox injections can actually help alleviate some health problems espcially related to muscles and nerves. Research is under way to learn how Botox specifically affects jaw muscles and their nerves to determine if this drug may be useful in treating TMJ disorders in the future.
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replied November 28th, 2008
Botox could help TMJ?? That's a surprise. Next thing you know, silicone implants will relieve your pain too Wink just kidding
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replied November 28th, 2008
Botox is for TMD, and the story on implants
Botox is being used "off label" to give temporary relief of TMD. Although the few doctors and dentists who are using it think most people will get relief from a vial, which should be done in 12 injections, 6 along the entire length of the masseters, some are advertising it as a cure, which it is not. And, you can't use it forever, since you'd lose your masseters.

Implants of replacement TMjoint discs were discontinued in the 1980's after high suicide rates among patients who were implanted for more than a year after the manfacturer had data saying that their profitable product had problems.

Dentists see the effects of bruxism and TMD on the teeth and reflexively start trying to repair the teeth, while occasionallly people too poor for dentists report new painfree lives as soon as they lose their teeth. Doctors and dentists are afraid to work on the real causes of TMD since there is not yet any blanket diagnosis or blanket cureall. Causes can come from so many sources, including bad bite, injuries, chronic pain or stress causing TMD, posture, stress, etc.

Even if Botox turns out to be tragically over-used for more than temporary relief and diagnosis, it is focusing doctors once again on the sometimes completely disabling, truly organic illness of TMD, which is a very good thing for our future, so don't despair! I have lost years being treated incorrectly for migraines, etc., or mistreated as a hypochondriac or ignored. Now that even some sleep studies include documentation of TMD, we know that it can make sleep an enemy (what could be more disabling?) and sometimes even reach 40 minutes of clenching per hour of sleep, which, compared to the daily sum total of approximately 20 minutes of food chewing, can't be ignored much longer!
Hang in there, and keep searching the internet regularly for new information, keeping in mind the caveats I have mentioned above!
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replied December 1st, 2008
Extremely eHealthy
botox is a very dangerous thing for tmd---ive looked at the research and looked at the side effects---i wont recommend anything i wont put in my own body and i will not put botox in my joint
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replied January 31st, 2012
Botox is fine for TMJ
I worked for Derms who injected Botox...and they have done plenty of research that shows that Botulinum toxin type A (Botox) is safe for TMJ, migraines, Hyperhidrosis (sweating), etc. In fact I just booked an appointment to get my jaw done as it has worn off and my ears are ringing again and pain in my jaw has started up. There are adverse reactions to most drugs...but the articles you read were probably more to blame of the unlicensed physicians injecting the substance, than the substance itself. If you see a derm, they will know how much and where exactly to inject. The TMJ muscle is tricky so you need someone very familiar with the facial make-up (skeleton)
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replied March 20th, 2013
Botox is not injected into the joint. It is injected to the masseter muscle to diminish spasms and clenching, while still allowing the patient to chew. It works!
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replied December 1st, 2008
No one would ever put Botox in a TMjoint - you researched?
I think it is important for people to realize that Botoxing is done to the jaw muscles, or masseters, in the cheeks not the joint. And there are many dentists, looking for a quick source of income requiring nothing but injections, some of whom unfortunately advertise it as a cure. It is not. Botox is only useful for temporary relief and diagnosis. In cases where it helps, people think that they are cured, but need to understand that in those few months of relief they must find out why they have TMD and work on curing its cause. Many dentists and doctors who botox masseters let people believe that it is a cure, which it is not. Some do not warn that temporary paralusis of the jaw muscles could require a liquide diet. It is never injected into TMjoints, nor near important nerves (frown, etc.) where you don't want even temporary paralasis.

Can you point to any specific side effects that make Botox dangerous to people who sometimes get their first normal sleep in many years of severe TMD? I can think of a side effect that is not dangerous, but can be surprising, after repeated Botox - after your cheek muscles are relaxed they atrophy, at least temporarily, giving a potentially sunken look to cheeks if they were severely hypoprophied. Because the use of Botox for this is off-label, there are only now clinical trials, which is why it is never paid for by insurance. A far greater problem, to me, is that so many dentists never even notice severe TMD, just filling and capping the destroyed back teeth, allowing it to become chronic.
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replied May 10th, 2010
in mid-february i had my first botox treatment for bruxism. HEAVEN! waking up without facial pain. unfortunately it is now early may and it has worn off. my doctor said i would need approximately 4 treatments for the muscles to weaken sufficiently in order to stop me clenching while i sleep. it worked so well that i thought one treatment would help me break the habit permanently.
it''s very expensive...Ãspam£300 per treatment but it certainly did the job until it wore off.
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replied June 23rd, 2010
I'm not scared of botox, I've had it in my forhead and eyes a few times. I just heard about it being a possible aid in TMJ. I have suffered with this since I was 15 years old, and am now 49! I was told I would only be able to live for 20 years with my popping jaw. For some odd reason I do not have pain. I have a lot of cracking and popping and cannot open or close my mouth without the popping and maneuvering it to change positions.

I have had all of the treatments available except I resisted the surgery that turned out to be a failure! I have been recommended to have total titanium replacement joints put in. That scares me!!! Even though the doctor has had success with his surgeries.

I would love to have a night's sleep where I don't grind and wake up all out of whack. I do have tenderness and discomfort all the time, and terrible neck and shoulder pain, but no actual radiating pain from the disorder.

What kind of side effects are you talking about regarding botox?
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replied June 24th, 2010
Well, I have never even heard of NM orthosis! I have had night-guards and splints over the years; I have had the bite worked on by grinding the teeth that are "off". I have had braces twice.

I recently visited an osteopath who did some manipulations. I get bi-weekly massages of just my neck and shoulders and jaw.

I have never gone online to look up information as I was afraid of what I would see. I am thankful for your information on this orthosis. I do not have any idea where to find someone to do this, but will look into it. Thank you for the information!!
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replied January 20th, 2011
Botox injections-masseter muscles for TMJ disorders
I had Botox injected into my massseters 2 weeks ago after going thru arthroscopic surgery for dislocated meniscus and severe degen changes in the joint. I am a clincher and a grinder and have lost 7 teeth even with a night guard because of it. The injections have reduced my grinding clinching and my pain when has gone down to a 2. Amazing difference. I would highly recommend it to those who have SEVERE cases like mine. Janet
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replied January 21st, 2011
I am also seriously considering Botox. TMJ facial & head pain have completely taken over my life. I recently began TMJ treatment with a NM dentist. Phase 1 of treatment was a $6,000 fixed appliance. After many office visits, adjustments and tensing, i still wake up every night with headaches and facial pain/clenching. However, the bite analysis shows bite in perfect alignment. Dr. suggests we move on to Phase 2, which is a total reconstruction of the upper arch at an amazing price of #23,000!!! Now, i'm pretty certain if I'd been told in the beginning that it would cost $30,000, i'd have said thanks but no thanks. And if that wasn't enough to stress me out and tighten up the ole jaws, he said the initial procedure would take 4-5 hrs!!! Now, i'm no rocket scientist, but why would anyone want a TMJ patient to have their mouth pryed open for 5 hrs!! All that torture & $$$$ for a procedure that may or may not work. Be very, very leary of NM. It does not work for everyone - and you can end up broke and still in pain.
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replied January 11th, 2012
tmj
I have had botox injected into my masseter twice in the past year for tmj and have had amazing results.. The first was over 6 months ago and the results from that section are still perfect. I just today had another section done and should be done. the Masseter does not need frequent botox injections in order to work. Ive read studies where just one 10-25 unit injection is all you need. with me so far so good
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