For the past 3 days, I've been waking up with my bite feeling really off and not like it's lining up correctly. It feels really uncomftorable and gives me pain when I bite down. Throughout the day it will change from my normal bite to feeling off every few hours. I don't understand why this is happening and it's really stressing me out. I do have moderate TMJ problems, but I've never had any issues with my bite feeling different or off. I recently have been undergoing physical therapy for a neck problem and the therapist has done some work on my head called craniosacral therapy. It is basically just massage of the head. Is it possible this could have affected my bite or something? Scared... Any help would be appreciated.
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replied September 22nd, 2011
Experienced User
In my personal experience, which is much different from yours, especially with symptoms and area where seeking relief and CS work... I personally found no relief through long-term craniosacral therapy.

This approach was recommended to me by a neuromuscular rehabilitation (M.D.) specialist, and after steroidal injections deep into the SI joint (which were stopped by the practioner, himself, as he didn't feel it was the correct solution, either!)

After years of specialized medical massage therapy supervised under the neuromuscular MD, to address the hip rotation issues the CS approach was recommended.

We (the CS therapist and I) attempted seeking relief through micro-movements with a "pelvic clock" technique. With me lying on a table with my legs bent at the knee.

This approach was suggested by the CS therapist, after she checked me at the waist, having bend over, toward the floor, and touching the spinal area to check for proper alignment, and checking pelvic alignment from the front (with pants unzipped, to check for relative accuracy).

After finding no relief through this technique, I abandoned such approach.

Dental work was never looked at, simultaneously. I have found that to be of utmost importance.


Ask your practitioner.
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replied September 22nd, 2011
Experienced User
Wikipedia provides link which offers basic information on what craniosacral therapy is.

If you want to PM me, I may share some xrays and photos with you, to share with you how necessary it is to have dental work, at the very least, "checked."

This may save you years and years of running from one practitioner to another.

Why the neuromuscular M.D. never recommended that is beyond my imagination. ?????

I got a good lesson in how the fascia and musculature work together and how to become dependent upon a team of massage therapists, as directed by an MD, for many years.

Looking back on it, the obvious first solution would have been to go to a neuromuscular dental practitioner in junction with such NM MD.

Do your research on all that dentistry, when you have time to focus on it.
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replied September 22nd, 2011
Experienced User
My apologies... [I wish there were a post-edit key!] to reiterate how important it is to communicate with your NM dentist and whoever else you may feel is important:
a long time ago ...maybe over 10 years ago... I was seen by a CS practitioner, and had no lasting results.

I was also seen by a Feldenkrais practitioner. The Feldenkrais practitioner (also a licensed physical therapist) recommended the pelvic clock approach, which is much different than a CS technique. I had no lasting results with either approach.

Still, Wikipedia offers a well-rounded answer as to what CS technique is...and, if you wanted to know ... something about Feldenkrais.

Good luck!
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