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autism - what is it?

what is autism?
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replied July 23rd, 2013
Autism is a complex disorder in the development of human beings. There are many causes of disease are given, but the specific cause is not yet fully understood. Genetic mechanisms contribute about 90% likelihood of developing autism in children, but the genetics of autism are complex and usually related to the corresponding gene. Some rare cases, autism is due to birth defects
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replied November 6th, 2014
I think it is brought by vaccines
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replied August 7th, 2013
I hope these information would help you to have a better understanding about autism.

Autism is known as a complex developmental disability. Experts believe that Autism presents itself during the first three years of a person's life. The condition is the result of a neurological disorder that has an effect on normal brain function, affecting development of the person's communication and social interaction skills.

People with autism have issues with non-verbal communication, a wide range of social interactions, and activities that include an element of play and/or banter.


The way in which a person with an ASD interacts with another individual is quite different compared to how the rest of the population behaves. If the symptoms are not severe, the person with ASD may seem socially clumsy, sometimes offensive in his/her comments, or out of synch with everyone else. If the symptoms are more severe, the person may seem not to be interested in other people at all.

t is common for relatives, friends and people who interact with someone with an ASD to comment that the ASD sufferer makes very little eye contact. However, as health care professionals, teachers and others are improving their ability to detect signs of autism at an earlier age than before, eye contact among people with autism is improving. In many cases, if the symptoms are not severe, the person can be taught that eye contact is important for most people and he/she will remember to look people in the eye.

A person with autism may often miss the cues we give each other when we want to catch somebody's attention. The person with ASD might not know that somebody is trying to talk to them. They may also be very interested in talking to a particular person or group of people, but does not have the same skills as others to become fully involved. To put it more simply, they lack the necessary playing and talking skills.

Empathy - Understanding and being aware of the feelings of others

A person with autism will find it much harder to understand the feelings of other people. His/her ability to instinctively empathize with others is much weaker than other people's. However, if they are frequently reminded of this, the ability to take other people's feelings into account improves tremendously. In some cases - as a result of frequent practice - empathy does improve, and some of it becomes natural rather than intellectual. Even so, empathy never comes as naturally for a person with autism as it does to others.

Having a conversation with a person with autism may feel very much like a one-way trip. The person with ASD might give the impression that he is talking at people, rather than with or to them. He may love a theme, and talk about it a lot. However, there will be much less exchanging of ideas, thoughts, and feelings than there might be in a conversation with a person who does not have autism.

Almost everybody on this planet prefers to talk about himself/herself more than other people; it is human nature. The person with autism will usually do so even more.

A number of children with an ASD do not like cuddling or being touched like other children do. It is wrong to say that all children with autism are like that. Many will hug a relative - usually the mother, father, grandmother, grandfather, teacher, and or sibling(s) - and enjoy it greatly. Often it is a question of practice and anticipating that physical contact is going to happen. For example, if a child suddenly tickles another child's feet, he will most likely giggle and become excited and happy. If that child were to tickle the feet of a child with autism, without that child anticipating the contact, the result might be completely different.

A person with autism usually finds sudden loud noises unpleasant and quite shocking. The same can happen with some smells and sudden changes in the intensity of lighting and ambient temperature. Many believe it is not so much the actual noise, smell or light, but rather the surprise, and not being able to prepare for it - similar to the response to surprising physical contact. If the person with autism knows something is going to happen, he can cope with it much better. Even knowing that something 'might' happen, and being reminded of it, helps a lot.

The higher the severity of the autism, the more affected are a person's speaking skills. Many children with an ASD do not speak at all. People with autism will often repeat words or phrases they hear - an event called echolalia.

The speech of a person with ASD may sound much more formal and woody, compared to other people's speech. Teenagers with Asperger's Syndrome can sometimes sound like young professors. Their intonation may sound flat.

A person with autism likes predictability. Routine is his/her best friend. Going through the motions again and again is very much part of his/her life. To others, these repetitive behaviors may seem like bizarre rites. The repetitive behavior could be a simple hop-skip-jump from one end of the room to the other, repeated again and again for one, five, or ten minutes - or even longer. Another could be drawing the same picture again and again, page after page.

How quickly a child with autism learns things can be unpredictable. They may learn something much faster than other children, such as how to read long words, only to forget them completely later on. They may learn how to do something the hard way before they learn how to do it the easy way.

It is not uncommon for people with autism to have tics. These are usually physical movements that can be jerky. Some tics can be quite complicated and can go on for a very long time. A number of people with autism are able to control when they happen, others are not. People with ASD who do have tics often say that they have to be expressed, otherwise the urge does not stop. For many, going through the tics is enjoyable, and they have a preferred spot where they do them - usually somewhere private and spacious. When parents first see these tics, especially the convoluted ones, they may experience shock and worry.
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replied November 19th, 2014
Stem Cell Therapy for Autism
Autism is used to describe a spectrum of disorders affecting brain development. This disorder is characterised by weakened social interaction, impaired verbal or non verbal communication and indulgence in repetitive behaviour. Though all these signs and symptoms start appearing after 3 years of age, scientists believe that the cause of this condition is rooted in certain mutational changes and environmental stress occurred during early life.

Much like a machine our brain relies on internal network of nerve cells for transmitting information. Through these networks our brain regulates other body function ranging from social behaviour to movements. These neurons are dependent upon surrounding glial cells for proper insulation, nutrition and oxygen requirement. Scientists have discovered that children with autism exhibit defects in the glial cells. These faulty glial cells are responsible for weakening of neurons and thus impairing effective communication amongst them.

The advent of stem cells technology has shown a new avenue in Autism cure. Besides having the potential to stimulate normal functioning of glial cells, these Adult Cells also have the capability to trigger an environment facilitating repair of weakened neurons and thus promoting improved communication and behavioural skills.
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replied January 19th, 2015
The advent of stem cells technology has shown a new avenue in Autism cure. Besides having the potential to stimulate normal functioning of glial cells, these Adult Cells also have the capability to trigger an environment facilitating repair of weakened neurons and thus promoting improved communication and behavioural skills.

Read more: autism - what is it? - Autism Forum - eHealthForum http://ehealthforum.com/health/autism-what -is-it-t391138.html#ixzz3PJ6Mwec7
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There is a cure for everything. Its just how much gov. can make off of the cure who which will inhabit them from releasing it to the public.
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replied February 26th, 2015
A very complicated disorder. I know about application called AuThink that aims to help children with autism. What do you think of to what extent it can help?
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replied February 28th, 2015
i believe it is cause by birth defects. Genes too, maybe.
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replied January 2nd, 2019
Autism is a complex neurobehavioral condition that includes impairments in social interaction and developmental language and communication skills.
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) impacts the nervous system and affects the ability to communicate and interact. As it told that Treatment can help, but this condition can't be cured.
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