I know ASCUS is mild but am wondering what the biopsy from a colposcopy is supposed to show?

on 6/4 I had my annual pap (I go yearly but for some reason this one was about 15 months between my last one). 10 days after the pap got the results as ASCUS and my RE/GYN had me come in for a colposcopy today. The NP that did the colpo said she saw a 'small area of dysplasia' and did a biopsy.

I have no idea if I have HPV, is this something that is tested routinely as part of an OB pregnancy panel? If not I have not been tested for it though I think that will be part of this biospy test.

So what are they looking for in this biopsy? The cause? The 'stage' of dysplasia or what? I asked what casued dysplasia and she told me intercourse, stress etc. It sounded like she was more or less trying to ease my anxiety or maybe it's 100% correct which is why I am asking here.

I am 37 yo, 2 children and also have PCOS without insulin issues.
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replied July 18th, 2008
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ASCUS means mild cellular changes.
Many times a slight infection (bacterial, fungal) or cervical inflammation may causes a Pap to come back as ASCUS.
That's why the first thing that have to be done after getting ASCUS result, is to repeat the PAP immediately or have colposcopy or repeat the PAP after 6 months.
Yes, friction due to sexual intercourse can cause inflammation that can be seen on PAP results as ASCUS.
There is no immediate cervical cancer risk in an ASCUS Pap smear.

Have you been tested for HPV infection?
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replied July 18th, 2008
MandMs wrote:
ASCUS means mild cellular changes.
Many times a slight infection (bacterial, fungal) or cervical inflammation may causes a Pap to come back as ASCUS.
That's why the first thing that have to be done after getting ASCUS result, is to repeat the PAP immediately or have colposcopy or repeat the PAP after 6 months.
Yes, friction due to sexual intercourse can cause inflammation that can be seen on PAP results as ASCUS.
There is no immediate cervical cancer risk in an ASCUS Pap smear.

Have you been tested for HPV infection?


Thanks for your reply. I don't know that I have ever been tested for HPV; I'd say not because I would remember it were it positive and I don't know my GYN would have reason to since my past paps have all been normal.
I was really expecting to have the pap repeated with such a low grade pap result but got a little concerned when my GYN jumped straight to having a colpo done. I do believe this biopsy will also be checking for HPV; that is what was listed on the form I signed for the pathology lab.

Thanks again for your reply!
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replied July 30th, 2008
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You are welcome!

There are several options that can be performed as follow-up of ASCUS Pap test result.
One is watchful waiting with follow-up Pap tests every 4 to 6 months, cause cervical changes may never progress and go away on their own about 50% of the time.
Colposcopy is the second option (the majority of abnormal Pap smears are due to inflammation and vaginal infection, so, the gynecologist uses colposcope to take closer look at the cervix and determine the nature of the cervical change).
The third option is to get checked for HPV infection with high-risk HP viruses, related to cervical cancer. If the patient tested positive for HPV of high-risk, then colposcopy is recommended.
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replied July 30th, 2008
Got the results back last week and turns out I do NOT have cancer, an infection or HPV. At this point they feel the dysplasia may be related to hormonal imbalance. I am going to have a hormone panel done soon and may need to start taking some sort of supplement depending on what is found. As I said I have PCOS and hormone issues come and go with me plus with my age peri-menopause is also can also be a factor.

Thank you SO much for all of your help!
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