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Hi

I'm a 20 year old female suffering from lower right abdominal pain. I've had it for about 2 years now, it's gotten a lot worse over the last few months and I don't feel like my GP is taking it seriously. The pain is localised in my lower right abdomen (between navel and hip), it's intermittent but severe. It's accompanied by nausea, chills/hot flushes, fatigue, dizziness and occasional muscle stiffness.

I don't know if it's related but I'm also getting calf tenderness (poking with a finger can bruise), rashes on my legs, occasional heart palpitations (too fast) and a complete lack of sex drive.

The pains don't seem to follow my menstrual cycle and it doesn't seem to change depending on what I eat, they just seem spontanious and can leave me in so much pain that I can't stand up long enough to even cook for myself.
In the last 2 years I have been passed on to about 4 or 5 doctors, and I've had about 4 ultrasounds (first one showed an ovarian cyst, second showed cyst on other side other 2 showed nothing) and 1 bloodtest. The last doctor I saw (about 2 months ago) gave me my first prescription for pain medication (Buscopan) and it doesn't work, at all. I don't feel like they're treating my case seriously at all.

I'm in a LOT of pain, was taken to A+E last thursday and given the usual blood pressure/blood sugar/urine/temperature tests, then I was given an anti-nausea pill and 2 Codeine pills and just sent home. The Codeine wore off after about an hour and I was in horrible pain again, which I don't consider a good sign...

I'm at a complete loss and I can't take it any more. I see my GP again on friday but I really don't see him being ANY help whatsoever Crying or Very sad I could really use some help and/or guidance

Thanks,
Lucy
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replied November 22nd, 2009
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Lucy,

Do you get stressed easily? Do you think it may be anxiety? It's possible you may be having anxiety and panic attacks. Also, have your doctor check your vitamin levels. A lack of Vit. D can cause body pain.
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replied November 22nd, 2009
I'm not easily stressed really. I mean I have quite a bit on my plate at the moment at university but it doesn't really get to me, I figure that rushing and stressing won't get the work done. Sometimes the pain comes when I'm lying in bed just about to fall asleep so I figured stress wasn't the problem.
As for the vitamin levels, I eat a lot of vegetables, drink a lot of fruit juice, etc. I'm keeping a fairly level diet (i.e. trying not to eat bad food all the time, only occasionally) including things with vitamin D (salmon, tuna, cereals, eggs, etc)
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replied October 28th, 2019
Thank you for asking at Ehealth forum!

I read your question and I understand your concern.
These features are suggestive of carcinoid syndrome. I would suggest you flexible sigmoidoscopy. Pelvic inflammatory disease is another differential.
I hope it helps. Stay in touch with your healthcare provider for further guidance as our answers are just for education and counselling purposes and cannot be an alternative to actual visit to a doctor.
Take care
Khan
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